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Mesa 20.0 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 20.0.0
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 20.0.0 as available for download immediately. I'm very
    pleased that we could get all of the issues blocking the release nailed down
    quickly and make a release on time for once!
    
    This is a .0 release, and you may want to continue to to track 19.3.x until
    20.0.1 comes out in two weeks. 19.3.5 is planned to be the final 19.3 release
    and is planned for next Wednesday.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Alyssa Rosenzweig (3):
          pan/midgard: Fix missing prefixes
          pan/midgard: Don't crash with constants on unknown ops
          pan/midgard: Use fprintf instead of printf for constants
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nir: Unify inputs_read/outputs_written before serializing NIR
    
    Dylan Baker (6):
          .pick_status.json: Update to 2a98cf3b2ecea43cea148df7f77d2abadfd1c9db
          .pick_status.json: Update to 946eacbafb47c8b94d47e7c9d2a8b02fff5a22fa
          .pick_status.json: Update to bee5c9b0dc13dbae0ccf124124eaccebf7f2a435
          Docs: Add 20.0.0 release notes
          docs: Empty new_features.txt
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0 release
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          Revert "nir: Add a couple trivial abs optimizations"
    
    Francisco Jerez (6):
          intel/fs/cse: Make HALT instruction act as CSE barrier.
          intel/fs/gen7: Fix fs_inst::flags_written() for SHADER_OPCODE_FIND_LIVE_CHANNEL.
          intel/fs: Add virtual instruction to load mask of live channels into flag register.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround unwanted SEND execution due to broken NoMask control flow.
          intel/fs/gen12: Fixup/simplify SWSB annotations of SIMD32 scratch writes.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround data coherency issues due to broken NoMask control flow.
    
    Krzysztof Raszkowski (1):
          gallium/swr: simplify environmental variabled expansion code
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't wait for shader compilation to finish when destroying a context
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Implement getImage/putImage on pbuffer swrast.
    
    Peng Huang (1):
          radeonsi: make si_fence_server_signal flush pipe without work
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          radeonsi/ngg: add VGT_FLUSH when enabling fast launch
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          glsl: fix a memory leak with resource_set
          iris: fix aux buf map failure in 32bits app on Android
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          Revert "st/va: Convert interlaced NV12 to progressive"
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          glsl: fix gl_nir_set_uniform_initializers() for image arrays
    
    luc (1):
          zink: confused compilation macro usage for zink in target helpers.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Released With Big Improvements For Intel, AMD Radeon Vulkan/OpenGL

    The Mesa 20.0 release switches to the new Intel OpenGL driver default, Vulkan 1.2 support for both AMD Radeon and Intel drivers, the RadeonSI OpenGL driver now has GL 4.6 compliance as part of switching to NIR, the Valve-backed ACO code-path for RADV is in much better shape, and many other improvements. See our Mesa 20.0 feature overview to learn about this big update.

  • Mesa 20.0 Is Imminent With New Intel OpenGL Default, Intel + RADV Vulkan 1.2, OpenGL 4.6 For RadeonSI

    With the release of Mesa 20.0 being imminent, here is a look at all of the new features for this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D stack for open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers.
    Highlights of the soon-to-be-out Mesa 20.0 are outlined below. Mesa 20.0 will be out as soon as today / this week unless delays happen over lingering bugs.
    - This is the first Mesa release where for those with Broadwell (Gen8) Intel graphics or newer the Intel Gallium3D driver is the new default for OpenGL support. This Intel Gallium3D driver is faster and in better shape than the i965 classic driver. That older OpenGL driver will stick around for supporting Haswell graphics and prior generations.

  • RADV Driver Adds VK_EXT_line_rasterization In Preparing For Eventual Vulkan CAD Apps

    Added to the Vulkan API last summer was VK_EXT_line_rasterization for line rasterization like employed by CAD applications. The open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver is now supporting this extension.

More/late coverage of Mesa 20.0 release

  • Mesa drivers 20.0.0 released, NVIDIA also have a small Vulkan driver update out

    Two bits of Linux driver news to share today, one quite big for AMD/Intel and the other on the smaller side for NVIDIA.

    Starting with NVIDIA, following on from the Vukan Beta driver update on the 15th they did a quick-fix and put another up with 440.58.02 yesterday. The only noted fix is "a regression which added syntax errors into the default application profiles configuration file" and that was specific to Linux.

  • Mesa 20.0 Arrives with OpenGL 4.6 on RadeonSI, Vulkan 1.2 on Intel ANV and RADV

    The Mesa 3D Graphics Library open-source graphics stack for Linux-based operating system got a new major series this week, Mesa 20.0, which brings numerous new features and improvements for a better gaming experience.

    Most of the work done during the development cycle of the Mesa 20.0 graphics stack appears to be around the AMD Radeon drivers, both OpenGL (RadeonSI) and Vulkan (RADV). This translates to improved gaming for AMD Radeon users on GNU/Linux.

    Highlights of the Mesa 20.0 release include OpenGL 4.6 support for the RadeonSI driver, Vulkan 1.2 support for both the Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers, and Wave32 support for AMD GFX10 (Navi) GPUs in the RADV Vulkan driver and its ACO compiler.

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