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Toradex launches Verdin module family starting with i.MX8M Mini and Nano models

Toradex unveiled a “Verdin” compute module family with a form factor similar to its Colibri family, but with 60 more pins and improved power features. Due in March are Linux-driven Verdin modules based on the i.MX8M Mini and Nano.

Toradex announced the Verdin iMX8M Mini and Verdin iMX8M Nano — the first two members of a new Verdin system-on-module (SoM) family and the company’s first i.MX8M family modules. The Verdin family seems destined to replace Colibri, as it has a similar form factor: 69.6 x 35.0 x 6.0mm (2,436 sq. mm) vs. 67.6 x 36.7 x 6.2mm (2,480.92 sq. mm) for the Colibri. The Verdin, however, supports 260 I/O pins on the DDR4 SODIMM connector compared to 200.

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Toradex Launches New Verdin Arm SoM Family Starting with iMX8M

  • Toradex Launches New Verdin Arm SoM Family Starting with iMX8M Mini/Nano Modules

    So far, Toradex had two Arm-based system-on-module families with the smaller, lower-power Colibri and more powerful Apalis modules. The Colibri form factor was first defined in 2005, and the company is still maintaining it, but since then new interfaces have emerged, so Toradex has now designed a new low-power module family called Verdin.

    Toradex Verdin modules offer more I/Os with a 260-pin edge connector, include a battery-ready design with a wide input voltage range (3.3 to 5V), low power 1.8V IOs, the ability to easily extend power management to carrier board peripherals, and off-the-shelf thermal solutions.

    The modules are also tested for EMC, shock and vibration tolerance, and “Toradex Direct Breakout” is said to simplify signal routing on carrier boards as high speed, impedance critical signals are routed from the source IC to the edge connector on the Verdin module in such a ways to limit complexity on the carrier board.

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