Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AOSP or 'Open' Android

Filed under
OS
Android
  • An /e/ phone in 2020

    The /e/ phone does not offer all the apps Android does, and it might not be entirely polished yet in the re-branding experience. However, it does provide a very solid, mostly Android compatible experience without the Google bits. The /e/ team offers a wider range of hardware support than most other iOS and Android competitors, it offers most of the popular Android apps people will probably want to use (I only discovered a few missing items I wanted), and the on-line cloud services are better than those of any other phone I’ve used (including Ubuntu One and Google).

    I’d certainly recommend /e/ for more technical users who can work around minor rough edges and who won’t get confused by the unusual branding and semi-frequent permission prompts. I’m not sure if I’d hand one of these phones over to an Android power-user who uses a lot of niche apps, but this phone would certainly do well in the hands of, for instance, my parents or other users who tend to interact with their phones for texting, phone calls, and the calendar without using many exotic applications.

  • A 'Pixel 5' mention spotted in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) comments

    While Google usually announces its flagship devices in October of every year, leaks and rumors of the devices begin showing up in the months leading to the launch. Details of the next-generation Pixels, however, seem to have begun leaking much earlier as there have been reports of the camera placement on Google’s upcoming flagship. Now, mentions of the “Pixel 5” in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code comments somewhat confirm the name and existence of such a device.

    The comment on a code change for the Linux kernel mentions the “Pixel 5 with (version) 4.19”, confirming the existence of a device running version 4.19 of the Linux kernel. Reports of a device running Linux kernel version 4.19 and named “bramble” have also been previously spotted. Codenames of upcoming Pixel devices leaked last month, bearing the names “redfin”, “sunfish”, and bramble” and at least one of those devices is believed to be the mid-range Pixel 4a.

  • Google Pixel 5 make appearance in Android Open Source Project

    Over the past few weeks, we have been seeing the leaks and rumors surrounding Google’s upcoming Pixel 4a smartphone. And now, details about the Pixel 5 flagship device have also surfaced. Just recently, the alleged design of the Google Pixel 5 XL leaked online.

    Now, Google’s next flagship has also leaked in its name. It turns out that Pixel 5 is already in the works within the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code. The leak comes from a new code change for the Linux kernel of Android, where developer Elena Petrova – of AOSP – explains that it has only been tested in Pixel 4 and not in any new device.

  • Google ‘Pixel 5’ makes its first appearance in Android Open Source Project

    We now have potential confirmation from AOSP code comments that Google’s next mainline Pixel phone will, unsurprisingly, bear the name “Pixel 5.” The confirmation comes from a new code change for Android’s Linux kernel, which the AOSP developer explains has only been tested on the Pixel 4 and not the Pixel 5.

  • Pixel 5 surfaces in Android Open Source Project, hints at mid-range chip

    We’ve already seen an alleged render of the upcoming Google flagship, and possible codenames for the Pixel 5 and 5 XL — Redfin and Bramble — have turned up. Now, a code change submitted to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) contained comments that directly mention the Pixel 5.

More in Tux Machines

Collabora Online Development Edition 6.4 Office Suite Gets a Fresh Look, Many Improvements

Coming three months after version 4.2, CODE (Collabora Online Development Edition) 6.4 is a major release that adds many great features, including a new, modern look with the NotebookBar, which not only saves sp`ace, but it also makes the interface easier to use and intuitive, especially for those familiar with the MS Office suite. The NotebookBar is set as default in this release and looks great with all core components, including Writer, Calc, and Impress. However, if users want to switch back to the classic interface, which won’t go away anytime soon, they can do that very easily by selecting ‘classic’ for the user_interface key in the loolwsd.xml file. Read more

Android Leftovers

Manage knowledge with BlueSpice, an open source alternative to Confluence

Knowledge management is a key to success in modern enterprises—but it is not exactly easy to achieve. Keeping track of all relevant details across all employees is a huge challenge, especially in agile environments, which most companies say they are. Most companies resort to buying wiki-like solutions, such as Confluence from Atlassian, which exposes them to the lock-in effect of proprietary software. But many would do well to consider BlueSpice, an open source alternative to Atlassian Confluence that has a noble ancestry: it's based on Wikipedia's MediaWiki. Read more

How to Contribute to the Fight Against COVID-19 With Your Linux System

Want to contribute to the research on coronavirus? You don’t necessarily have to be a scientist for this. You may contribute with part of your computer’s computing power thanks to Rosetta@home project. Read more