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'Open-source' Rotary Cellphone

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Hardware
Gadgets

  • You can now own a mobile phone with a rotary dial — if that’s really something you want

    While some would be quite literally lost without theirs, smartphones that give us access to a world of information in our pocket but constantly ask to be pulled out of there and stared at have become so complicated many people now find them annoying.
    This has triggered the rise of “dumbphones”, which look like the mobile phones of the past while still having some modern technologies.
    These devices range from the quite cheap to the weirdly expensive.
    Some customers opt for these phones to disconnect from the always online world – while others merely want to be seen to be doing so.
    But if you’re looking for the ultimate disconnected phone, one tinkerer has the perfect device.
    Justine Haupt is an associate scientist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York.
    She’s also the creator of the open source Rotary Cellphone, a mobile phone with a tactile spinning dial like the kind that was common on house phones until around the 1980s.

  • Rotary Cellphone
  • Open-source rotary cellphone

    Justine Haupt made this handsome and completely functional rotary cellphone. Her design is open-source and you can even buy a case kit from her company, Sky's Edge Robotics. You have to find and carefully modify your own rotary dial, though -- they're apparently no longer made -- as well as a few other components.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to configure a print server with Ubuntu Server, CUPS, and Bonjour

    You probably have a few Linux machines in your data center that have a few CPU cycles to spare. Why not make use of them for a printer server? After all, most businesses still rely on printing for certain departments. When your business is large enough to require a print server, you might as well go with a tried and true system: Linux.

  • A “Hello World” virtual machine running the Hurd

    There’s been a bit of speculation as to whether our April 1st post was a joke. Part of it was a joke: we’re not deprecating Linux-libre, fear not! But when we published it, it was already April 2nd in Eastern parts of the world and thus, not surprisingly, the remainder of the post was less of a joke.

  • Reviewing Docker Logs

    Many of you know that it's possible to access Docker container logs using "docker logs" command. But fewer people know that it's possible to follow logs stream for new messages (like tail -f), and even fewer yet are aware that it's possible to specify timestamps of the period you want to review – showing only specific logs during that period.

  • 7 echo command uses in Linux with examples

    Echo command outputs strings that are passed as arguments and usually used in shell scripts and batch files to output status text to a screen or as a source part of a pipeline. Syntax: echo [-n] [string ...] Let's learn its usage in Linux with practical examples in today's session of Terminal Tuts.

  • 4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN

    4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN Let's go over the setup and usage of VPNs as they are the best method to work from home. I have set up several VPNs over the past couple of weeks and here are a few of the methods I have used.

  • Linux system housekeeping 101: Managing file storage

    One of your many duties as a system administrator is the often daunting task of keeping your system's filesystems clear of clutter. It's not an easy task, is it? This first article in a short housekeeping series explores some basic system housekeeping concepts that will keep your systems healthy and your users responsible.

  • How to Take Screenshots without Shadows in KDE

    KDE’s desktop effects are fantastic, except when taking screenshots for use on your site or blog. Great-looking shadows around every desktop element are captured as well and can end up conflicting with your site or blog’s theme. Most screenshot tools insist on capturing them, and the option they offer to disable decorations can also change how windows look. The only solution seems to be to capture a rectangular area and then manually define the region of each screenshot or maybe to edit each screenshot afterward in something like GIMP.

  • How to Install Shutter Screenshot Tool in Ubuntu 20.04

    This quick tutorial shows how to install Shutter, one of the most popular screenshot applications for Linux desktop, in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Shutter is removed from the main Ubuntu repositories since Ubuntu 18.10, along with some old Gnome libraries required by the screenshot tool. It is however can be easily installed via the community maintained PPA repository in Ubuntu 19.10, Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How To: Recover Deleted Files With PhotoRec

    If you find yourself here reading this article, it probably means something has gone terribly wrong. Take a deep breath, we’re going to get through this. Buried in the depths of the Google search results for “deleted file recovery,” past the very aggressive SEO results of various companies trying to get you to buy their software, lies a result for one of my favorite pieces of free open-source software, PhotoRec. It is a companion program to TestDisk, another piece of wonderful open-source software, created by CGSecurity under the GNU General Public License. In this guide, we will go through the relatively painless process of recovering deleted files with PhotoRec. These tools are especially useful for recovering files from portable flash media used with digital cameras.

  • emacs and uemacs

Software: PeaZip, GIMP, Chrome, YADM and Homeshick

  • PeaZip 7.2.0

    Open and extract 180+ archive formats: 001, 7Z, ACE(*), ARC, ARJ, BZ2, CAB, DMG, GZ, ISO, LHA, PAQ, PEA, RAR, TAR, UDF, WIM, XZ, ZIP ZIPX - view full list of supported archive file formats for archiving and for extraction.

  • Photo software options [Ed: GIMP (the GNU Image Manipulation Program) listed under "Freeware" (which is wrong)]

    GIMP (the GNU Image Manipulation Program) is an open source program that has been around since the mid-to-late 1990s so there’s been plenty of time to refine it. Available for the Linux, Mac OS X and Windows platforms it provides most of the same features as Adobe’s Photoshop and its user interface is highly customisable. It also supports many of the plugins offered by third-party developers.

  • Google Chrome 81 Now Available for Download on Linux, Windows, and Mac

    Google has just released Chrome 81 on all supported platforms, including Linux, Windows, and Mac. The new version is 81.0.4044.92, and it includes several notable improvements, including support for the Web NFC API, which means that web apps can finally use the built-in NFC. In other words, if your device is bundled with an NFC, web apps can use it though Google Chrome, either for data transfer or for other implementations. Google says it has resolves a total of 32 security vulnerabilities with this release, with the company once again paying thousands of dollars in bounties to researchers who reported the flaws.

  • It's all in the dot file - YADM and Homeshick

    Backups are important. Backups are crucial. Backups are love, backups are life. Over the years, I've talked about the cardinal value of keeping your data safe, and that means multiple copies, multiple locations. We also talked about how to concoct your own quick 'n' dirty setup with tar and gpg recently. That one covers both data and application settings. Speaking of the latter ... Let's expand on this some more. If you have multiple computers, reinstall systems frequently, or just like to have a consistent configuration across multiple hosts, you might be interested in a way to manage application settings. In Linux, most software keeps their configurations in hidden files inside the home directory, either at the top level (/home/username) or inside the .config sub-directory. Either way, there could be plenty of them, you want to make sure you always have a copy, and if something goes wrong, you can easily revert to a good checkpoint. Introducting YADM and Homeshick.

Qt and KDE Development

  • New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

    With an apparent blame on the novel coronavirus, The Qt Company is said to be considering restricting new Qt releases to paying customers for a period of twelve months in an effort to boost their near-term finances. Earlier today The Qt Company published a 2020 Qt road-map while following that a Phoronix reader tipped us off to the latest discussions between KDE, the Qt project, and The Qt Company. KDE and the open-source Qt folks have been in discussions with The Qt Company especially with the restrictions announced back in January by The Qt Company that LTS point releases might only be available to commercial customers, Qt Accounts being needed for binary package downloads, etc.

  • Qt, Open Source and corona
    Dear KDE community,
    
    the relationship between the KDE community, the Qt project and The Qt Company 
    has always been close and beneficial for all three.
    
    * The Qt Company benefits from having a large and healthy community of 
    contributors, developers and experts around their product.
    * KDE benefits from being able to use Qt and to contribute directly to Qt.
    * The Qt project benefits from having the company as a steward and very large 
    contributor, and having KDE as a large and well-known sub-community.
    
    Last December, I published a document explaining the win-win-win-relationship: 
    http://www.olafsw.de/a-better-qt-because-of-open-source-and-kde/
    
    
    Unfortunately, The Qt Company is currently considering to stop this healthy 
    cooperation.
    
    Fortunately, the KDE Free Qt Foundation exists, which secures the continued 
    existence of Open Source Qt:
    https://kde.org/community/whatiskde/kdefreeqtfoundation.php
    Together with Martin Konold, I represent KDE in the board of the foundation.
    
    
    I will now give you a bit of background information.
    
    During the past two years, there have been negotiations between The Qt Company 
    and the KDE Free Qt Foundation for updating the contract.
    
    Our goals in negotiations:
    * helping the company increase their revenue without harming the Qt project or 
    the KDE community
    * strengthening the protection of the Qt project and of the KDE community
    * avoiding a parting of ways between The Qt Company and the Qt+KDE communities
    
    Concrete areas included in the negotiations are:
    
    * Fixing the incompatibility between paid Qt license terms and using or 
    contributing to Open Source
    (“Prohibited Combination” in https://www.qt.io/terms-conditions/ )
    * Fixing the license incompatibility between the Qt Design Studio (which is 
    only partly Free Software) and our existing contract with the company
    * Making our contract with the company stronger, requiring them to make 
    immediate Free Software releases of Qt (currently, they are allowed to delay 
    by 12 months) to ensure the availability of LTS security fixes for KDE
    * Updating our contract to include Wayland
    * Evaluating contract changes suggested by the company aimed at making the Qt 
    business more profitable, for example the option of selling bundles of Qt with 
    other software, or making integrations with proprietary third-party software 
    possible
    
    
    One setback in the negotiations has been an announcement of The Qt Company in 
    January: https://www.qt.io/blog/qt-offering-changes-2020
    They announced that LTS releases of Qt will only be available for paid license 
    holders. It is still unclear what this implies for contributions to Qt and for 
    the sharing of security fixes between the various parties (including The Qt 
    Company, the many Qt experts contributing, the KDE community, and Linux 
    distributions).
    
    At an in-person meeting in Frankfurt on March 6, we nevertheless managed to 
    lay the groundwork for a possible path forward, continuing with an approach 
    beneficial to all sides.
    
    
    But last week, the company suddenly informed both the KDE e.V. board and the 
    KDE Free QT Foundation that the economic outlook caused by the Corona virus 
    puts more pressure on them to increase short-term revenue. As a result, they 
    are thinking about restricting ALL Qt releases to paid license holders for the 
    first 12 months. They are aware that this would mean the end of contributions 
    via Open Governance in practice.
    
    Obviously, it cannot be in the middle- and long-term health of The Qt Company 
    to separate itself from the very strong Qt + KDE communities.
    
    We hope The Qt Company will reconsider. However, this threat to the Open 
    Source community needs to be anticipated, so that the Qt and KDE communities 
    can prepare themselves.
    
    The Qt Company says that they are willing to reconsider the approach only if 
    we offer them concessions in other areas. I am reminded, however, of the 
    situation half a year ago. We had discussed an approach for contract updates, 
    which they suddenly threw away by restricting LTS releases of Qt instead.
    
    
    What does this mean for the future of Qt and for the future of KDE?
    
    All software changes in Qt will still be available at as Open Source as 
    required by our contract – maybe with a delay of 12 months if the company 
    decides to part ways with the communities.
    
    We will continue to work on a contract update that helps all sides. But even 
    if these negotiations were to be unilaterally stopped by The Qt Company, Qt 
    will stay Open Source, and KDE will be able to use it. I am also absolutely 
    sure that the Qt + KDE communities will continue cooperation on new features, 
    bug fixes, and security fixes, even should The Qt Company decide to forgo the 
    benefits of cooperation.
    
    I invite The Qt Company to stay with us. It will be worthwhile.
    
    
    Best regards,
    
    Olaf
    
    
  • Learn PyQt: Packaging PyQt5 & PySide2 applications for Windows, with PyInstaller

    There is not much fun in creating your own desktop applications if you can't share them with other people — whether than means publishing it commercially, sharing it online or just giving it to someone you know. Sharing your apps allows other people to benefit from your hard work! The good news is there are tools available to help you do just that with your Python applications which work well with apps built using Qt5. In this tutorial we'll look at the most popular tool for packaging Python applications: PyInstaller. This tutorial is broken down into a series of steps, using PyInstaller to build first simple, and then increasingly complex PyQt5 applications into distributable EXE files on Windows. You can choose to follow it through completely, or skip ahead to the examples that are most relevant to your own project.

  • Virtual KDE PIM Sprint April 2020

    Last weekend would have been the traditional annual KDE PIM meeting in Toulouse, but with travel being largely shut down in Europe we had to do this virtually. That meant missing out on the culinary treats of being in France, but we got a few things done nevertheless. [...] Nico has been working on this, eventually enabling platform calendar abstraction behind the KCalendarCore API. So the same application code could be using a calendar from Akonadi on a desktop system and the Android calendar on a phone. We hopefully managed to sort out the remaining conceptual questions for this (modeling hierarchies, lazy population of expensive calendars, separate classes for the calendar metadata or not). Moving PIM modules to KDE Frameworks KDAV is nearing completion for transitioning to Frameworks after the 20.04 release (so in May or June). A final review pass resulted in a few more improvements and API cleanups. Following KDAV the possible candidates are the KGAPI library, which is already used externally and thus would benefit most, as well as the various email frameworks (MIME, IMAP, SMTP).

Graphics: TURNIP, AMD and Vulkan

  • TURNIP Vulkan Driver Lands Initial Geometry Shader Support

    The TURNIP open-source Vulkan driver continues advancing in-step with the other Mesa drivers. TURNIP is the open-source Vulkan driver for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware and developed by the same crew as the well known Freedreno. For a while after initially being merged to Mesa just over one year ago, there wasn't much progress to report but recently the involved developers at Google and elsewhere have been picking up work on this Qualcomm Vulkan driver option.

  • AMD Rebases Their OpenMP For Radeon GPUs Against LLVM 11

    At the end of last year with ROCm 3.0 AMD introduced the AOMP compiler for OpenMP support targeting Radeon GPUs. AOMP is another downstream of LLVM Clang and on Tuesday marked the latest update. AOMP so far has been developed independently of the LLVM Clang code-base and it remains to be seen any mainlining plans they have of getting this OpenMP offloading for Radeon GPUs upstream. Following their AOMP update in March they have now announced AOMP Release 11.0-1.

  • AMD ACO Begins Using Navi NGG For Tessellation + Vertex Shaders

    The AMD "ACO" compiler backed by Valve for offering a faster shader compiler back-end than AMDGPU LLVM for the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver has begun making use of Navi's NGG "Next-Gen Geometry" hardware. It has been a slow path for the open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers to make use of NGG as found with the Navi/GFX10 hardware (sans Navi 14 being borked). There have been bugs to deal with and other obstacles in supporting this engine designed to offer faster geometry performance.

  • Vulkan 1.2.137 Specification Brings Many Clarifications + Fixes, Faster HTML Doc Loading

    Less than one month ago came the big Vulkan 1.2.135 update with official ray-tracing capabilities and other extension promotions. Out today is Vulkan 1.2.137 with a whole lot of clarifications and fixes. Vulkan isn't slowing down at all due to the coronavirus but its adoption continues to grow and the Vulkan working group continues delivering timely updates with new extensions and fixes/corrections.