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3-D Printing and Open Hardware: MakerBot, AAScan and RISC-V

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Hardware
  • MakerBot Targets Schools With Rebranded Printers

    MakerBot was poised to be one of the greatest success stories of the open source hardware movement. Founded on the shared knowledge of the RepRap community, they created the first practical desktop 3D printer aimed at consumers over a decade ago. But today, after being bought out by Stratasys and abandoning their open source roots, the company is all but completely absent in the market they helped to create. Cheaper and better printers, some of which built on that same RepRap lineage, have completely taken over in the consumer space; forcing MakerBot to refocus their efforts on professional and educational customers.

  • 3D-Printed 3D Scanner made to work with your phone

    An Arduino-based 3D scanner was created by an industrious 3D printing enthusiast and released open source this week for all to enjoy. This open source project was made to take out the most time-consuming component of the 3D scan process, giving said process instead to an Android phone combined with 3D-printed parts, a cheap motor, and an Arduino. This is not the first time such a system has been attempted, but it does appear to be the most complete and ready-to-roll system to date.

  • AAScan open source Arduino 3D scanner utilizes the power of your smartphone

    Using the power of Arduino and utilising the camera and powerful performance of a smartphone QLRO has created a fantastic 3D scanner aptly named the AAScan. Check out the video below to learn more about the Android 3D scanner which is open source and fully automated.

  • Video: RISC-V momentum around the world, from edge to HPC

    In this keynote talk from the 2020 HiPEAC conference, RISC-V Foundation Chief Executive Calista Redmond explains how the RISC-V open-source instruction set architecture is gathering momentum around the world, finding applications across the compute continuum from edge to high-performance computing.

  • Weekend Discussion: How Concerned Are You If Your CPU Is Completely Open?

    For some interesting Sunday debates in the forums, how important to you is having a completely open CPU design? Additionally, is POWER dead? This comes following interesting remarks by an industry leader this weekend.

    Stemming from discussions on Twitter about Raptor's new OpenBMC firmware with a web GUI in tow, one of the discussions ended up shifting to that of open CPU designs and the belief that secretive CPU startup NUVIA could be having an open-source firmware stack.

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today's howtos

Games: Humble Conquer COVID-19 Bundle and Much More

  • The Humble Conquer COVID-19 Bundle is live with lots of Linux games and all going to charity

    The Humble Conquer COVID-19 Bundle has arrived to help in the fight, with tons of games (and lots for Linux) and 100% of the proceeds of this will go to charity.

  • You can build you own bundle of Codemasters racing games over on Humble Bundle

    Got the need for speed? Codemasters might possibly be able to help with that, as they have a new bundle over on Humble Bundle where you pick what games you want. A good time to complete your racing game collection perhaps, there's quite a few of them here. The way it works is that if you pick at least three, your discount gets bigger. The same happens if you pick 4 and 5 titles with each again giving you a bigger discount in total. There's various DiRT games, lots of F1 titles and others.

  • Legend of Keepers from Goblinz Studio manages to sell over 33K copies in less than a month

    Always nice to see an indie developer doing reasonably well! Goblinz Studio, creator of Legend of Keepers: Career of a Dungeon Master, have announced a pretty great start for it. Releasing only on March 19, they said on Twitter how they were going to do a special message about it hitting a 30K milestone but they hit over 33K before being able to to do so. It's important to note that this is across Humble, GOG and Steam together. They also mentioned in another Twitter post about 4 days after release, that it had sold 1.3K copies on GOG alone in that time.

  • Paradox to give players a lot more guidance in Crusader Kings 3 - new overview video

    Crusader Kings is a complicated grand strategy series and not particularly accessible to new people. Crusader Kings 3 aims to change that as they've said before and over this month they gave more detail on what they're doing. Through March they put out new developer diaries focusing on tutorials, governments, war, civil war and more. Paradox is paying particular attention to making the interface of Crusader Kings III much easier to understand, with a full guided tutorial that runs through various parts of the interface and the gameplay mechanics. One of the major differences will be Tooltips, a great many of them and once you get through the guided tutorial you then get special mini-tutorials to follow along so you don't get overwhelmed.

  • Fates of Ort is an RPG where time stops until you move - it's absolutely great and it's out now

    We've got a lot of turn-based RPGs, a few real-time with pausing and a few entirely real-time but Fates of Ort still manages to make it all feel so new and interesting again. Think SUPERHOT as a retro pixel-art RPG and you get the idea. Not some gimmick either, as it works brilliantly. Also making it quite unique is the Magic system, which consumes your own life—as they say "Magic is powerful, but it is not free.". So you not only need to plan your moves, watching enemies move when you move but also plan how and when to use your magic and not overly so to cause your own death.

  • Valve's revamp of Artifact with a 2.0 Beta will start going out to players sometime soon

    Valve recently announced to expect news for their card game Artifact sometime soon, and now they're saying an Artifact 2.0 Beta will start trickling out to players. In the announcement on Steam, they made it clear that they've been working on revamping the core mechanics of Artifact. You will now be able to zoom out any time, to see and interact with all three lanes at once. However, the "majority" of effect still only work across one lane so they're all still important but a player is less likely to get shut out of a lane like they used to. Something better is that Valve will no longer sell cards, so there's no chance of facing an opponent with more money who has a completely stacked deck to steamroll over you. There's even a new "Hero Draft" mode, "that gives you a taste of constructing decks without all the pressure".

  • Imperator: Rome free to play until April 5, plus Archimedes update and Magna Graecia content pack out now

    Imperator: Rome from Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio today had a huge update release along with a new DLC content pack and you can play free until April 5.

  • Manage the flow of passengers in 'STATIONflow' - leaving Early Access on April 15

    STATIONflow is a game about managing a very busy underground train station that's currently in Early Access with Linux support, which is to officially release on April 15. Quite a complex-looking game that has you build 3D layouts, guiding passengers around to their destinations. You drag and drop corridors and platforms around, with a free-form layout system so that the flow of passengers is only as good as your imagination for planning. This also means you can constantly optimise and re-build, when you discover a better layout.

  • Get ready to play with renaissance paintings as 'The Procession to Calvary' releases in April

    The Procession to Calvary has such a brilliant idea with it bringing Renaissance Paintings to life in a point and click style adventure. I am genuinely excited to play this. Just recently announced for released on April 9, it brings together classic pieces from Rembrandt, Botticelli, Michelangelo and many more in a unique way to provide a special new world to explore.

  • Valve makes auto-update adjustments to help with managing Steam's bandwidth use

    After multiple streaming services announced they were dropping their quality for a while, to help internet providers cope with so many more at home, Valve have started speaking about their own ways to manage bandwidth too. In the blog post on Steam, Valve mentioned how they've now adjusted download priorities so that games you've not played recently will move from using off-peak timings for auto-updates to spreading them over multiple days. Only games you've played in the last three days will update immediately. This doesn't change you clicking on a game that needs an update, as it will begin to update as normal when you request it. They also said they're looking into "additional solutions to help on our side" so we might see more download options in the Steam client eventually.