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Variscite Rises to Platinum Member of NXP Partner Program

[Tel-Aviv, Israel, June 04, 2020] Following a very successful partnership between the two companies and Gold membership in the NXP Partner Program for 8 years, under which hundreds of end products were designed around Variscite’s System on Modules based on NXP’s i.MX applications processors, both companies have decided to strengthen their partnership further. With this decision, Variscite becomes the only System on Module vendor to join NXP’s Platinum Partner. “Since the launch of the i.MX 6 series in 2012, the number of markets and companies utilizing our processors has grown exponentially,” Commented Ron Martino, senior vice president and general manager, Edge Processing Business, NXP Semiconductors. “Having strong module partners who enable us to reach and extend market penetration has been critical for our i.MX product line growth. Among our many valued partners, Variscite exemplifies exceptional collaboration through their adoption of i.MX 6 to i.MX 8 portfolios, innovative SOM design, and customer adoption across a wide variety of markets. The promotion of Variscite to our Platinum Program level is well deserved and will be the foundation for further collaboration and growth between our two companies.” “This promotion brings a closer collaboration with NXP that will enrich the enablement and implementation of system solutions based on Variscite’s products and NXP’s technologies” said Ofer Austerlitz, VP Business Development and Sales at Variscite. For the past 17 years, Variscite designed, developed, and manufactured a wide range of System on Modules focusing on i.MX 6, 7 and 8 processor series, providing its customers with trusted embedded solutions for different verticals and purposes. Variscite has been part of the early access for all i.MX 8 series platforms. During the past two years, Variscite launched a respectable number of new System on Modules based on i.MX 8M, i.MX 8M Mini, i.MX 8M Nano, i.MX 8X and i.MX 8QuadMax SoCs and will soon launch modules based on the i.MX 8M Plus. The Variscite products launched in synchronization with NXP’s new product introductions, delivering strong collaboration in go-to-market strategies. Variscite continually sets a high bar for the Arm®-based System on Module market, focusing on strong customer support, closely accompanying its customer from the early concept phase to successful mass production. With the launch of the various i.MX 8 applications processor platforms, Variscite has established two highly-scalable, pin-compatible product families based on NXP i.MX 6 and i.MX 8 series. The VAR-SOM and DART Pin2Pin product families offer Variscite’s customers significant long-term advantages such as high scalability, optimized cost/performance, ease of development, and extended lifetime longevity. Learn more: Variscite Partner Profile on NXP.com

Greenie 20.04 Released: Ubuntu-Based Linux Distro For E-Book Readers And Authors

Greenie Linux is a Ubuntu-based Linux distribution specially designed for e-book readers and writers. It originates from Slovakia and hence optimized for users in Slovakia and the Czech Republic. However, Greenie OS also supports the English language. Stanislav Hoferek, Greenie Linux developer, has recently released the new version Greenie 20.04. The latest release packs the power of both Ubuntu 20.04 LTS repositories and Kubuntu using KDE Plasma desktop 5.18. K Desktop Environment (KDE) is a new entry in Greenie Linux that replaces its previous MATE desktop. Read more

Improve Linux system performance with noatime

Whenever I upgrade Linux on my home computer, I have a list of tasks I usually do. They've become habits over the years: I back up my files, wipe the system, reinstall from scratch, restore my files, then reinstall my favorite extra applications. I also make a few system tweaks. I've been making some of these tweaks for so long that I recently wondered if I still needed to do them. One tweak is atime, which is one of the three timestamps on every file on Linux (more on that later). Specifically, I wondered if it's still worth it to disable atime in more recent Linux systems. Since atime is updated every time the file is accessed, my understanding was that it had a significant impact on system performance. Read more

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys state collection

In the past couple of articles, we explained the core state concept of ZSys, and when we create state saves in particular. A lot of those operations are automated either on a time-scheduled (user states save), on system changes (installation, upgrade or removal for system states) and also when you ask a revert to a previous states. Even if individually, the cost of a state save is really low, this creates more and more ZFS datasets over time that will take some disk space. We needed to shape a strategy to clean them up on the go, silently, for our users. Read more