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GNU: GDB (Debugger), Project's History, and GCC (Compiler)

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GNU
  • GDB Debugger Adds Support For Debuginfod Web Server

    Debuginfod is the Red Hat led debug information HTTP web server distributed as part of elfutils and able to supply on-demand source code and ELF/DWARF debug files to debuggers / IDEs / other compiler tooling. The GDB debugger can now tap debuginfod for on-demand source files and debug information that isn't present on the local system.

    The motivation with debuginfod is to carry less developer "baggage" on local systems when it comes to debug files and potentially even source files. Particularly for organizations or cases like Linux distributions, a centralized debuginfod server could in turn supply the needed files to clients based upon the requested build ID. Red Hat has been working to expand the debuginfod support both for the GNU toolchain and also LLVM, among other possible users.

  • When is GOTS not in the national interest?

    The modern open-source software (OSS) movement can be traced back to the early 1980s with the birth of Richard Stallman’s GNU Project and the Free Software Foundation.

    [...]

    However, cost is a red herring for the real challenge presented by GOTS software solutions. On the surface, GOTS seems very similar to OSS which implies that it has the larger structural advantages of OSS. If handled cautiously, it can have those advantages, but care needs to be taken about what sort of existing software is being commoditized. The U.S. has a national interest in maintaining a strong software development capability. We are fortunate to be the dominant software-building country in the world. According to the Forbes 2000 list, the total market capitalization of U.S. internet, software, and computer services companies is close to $4.7 trillion — more than twice the rest of the world combined. Software tech is an enormous comparative advantage for the U.S. As a result, it is clearly in the national interest to have the government avoid directly competing against and potentially weakening the U.S. private sector.

  • New compiler added to popular studio for ARM and Cortex-M IDE

    The studio for ARM/Cortex-M is now supplied with three different compilers: GCC, Clang and the company's own compiler. The new compiler outperforms GCC and regular Clang on most benchmarks, decreasing both size of generated code as well as its execution speed.

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