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Panfrost Open-Source Driver Gets Initial OpenGL ES 3.0 Support

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This comes as great news for Linux users, especially gamers. While many 3D apps and games have basic OpenGL ES 2.0 support, for advanced rendering tasks the newer OpenGL ES 3.0 is required, and Panfrost now supports it.

As expected, OpenGL ES 3.0 is by far more powerful than its predecessor, adding new features like to 3D textures, instanced rendering, multiple render targets on Mali T760 GPUs and higher, primitive restart, as well as uniform buffer objects.

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Also: Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Adds Experimental OpenGL ES 3.0 For Open-Source Arm Mali

Experimental Panfrost GLES 3.0 support has landed in Mesa

  • Experimental Panfrost GLES 3.0 support has landed in Mesa

    In the early days of Panfrost, the free and open-source graphics driver for Mali GPUs, we focused on OpenGL ES 2.0. Many applications and games work have basic support for ES 2.0 but for advanced rendering require the newer, more featureful OpenGL ES 3.0... for which Panfrost now has initial support!

    ES 3.0 adds dozens of new features to ES 2.0 to enable faster and more realistic rendering. To support it, we've added features to Panfrost like instanced rendering, primitive restart, uniform buffer objects, 3D textures, and multiple render targets (on Mali T760 and up). Features like instanced rendering and primitive restart allow developers to write faster graphics applications, to render efficiently scenes more complex than possible in ES 2.0. Features like uniform buffer objects and 3D texture give developers a more natural environment to write efficient graphics shaders, again allowing for more complex fast applications. Finally, features like multiple render target enable a range of modern rendering techniques like deferred shading.

  • Open source 'Panfrost' driver for Mali GPUs gets initial GLES 3.0 support

    Do you have a system laying around rocking a Mali GPU (perhaps in a Chromebook)? The good news is Mesa just got experimental support for OpenGL ES (GLES) 3.0 to give them more advanced graphics support.

    Writing on the Collabora blog, graphics hacker Alyssa Rosenzweig noted about the initial GLES 3.0 support landing in upstream Mesa today. They've added tons of new features to the Panfrost driver including: instanced rendering, primitive restart, uniform buffer objects, 3D textures and multiple render targets (on Mali T760 and up).

    All of this together means some more modern games can run on these Mali chips, they've tested the classic open source racing game SuperTuxKart and mentioned how "SuperTuxKart's ES 3.0 non-deferred renderer now works with Panfrost".

Panfrost Open-Source Arm Mali GPU Driver Gets Experimental

  • Panfrost Open-Source Arm Mali GPU Driver Gets Experimental OpenGL ES 3.0 Support

    Panfrost is the open-source driver being developed for Arm Midgard and Bitfrost GPUs. The first versions focused on support for OpenGL ES 2.0, but the more recent OpenGL ES 3.0 enables faster and more realistic rendering.

    The goods news is that Panfros support for experimental OpenGL ES 3.0 has landed in Mesa according to a recent post on Collabora blog.

Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Seeing New "BIR" Compiler

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Seeing New "BIR" Compiler

    The Panfrost open-source, reverse-engineered Arm Mali Gallium3D driver is seeing work on a new driver-specific IR and compiler back-end.

    Lead Panfrost developer Alyssa Rosenzweig of Collabora has landed the first bits of the new "BIR" work. This is the Bifrost IR modeled for Arm's Bifrost GPU architecture, a.k.a. the Mali G31 through Mali G76.

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