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My sysadmin toolbox

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Software

My working day includes a variety of tasks, and most of them take place on the command line, because that approach enables me to do things in the most efficient way. But you can also waste a lot of time on the command line if you don't know what utilities will give you what you need quickly. Here's an introduction to the most important tools I use every day.

zsh

The GNU Bourne Again Shell, bash, is the command line interpreter traditionally associated with Linux systems, and most GNU/Linux systems ship it as default. While it has considerably improved in terms of comfort, it stands behind the powerful Z Shell, which you can use as a superset of the Bourne Again Shell.

The additional features zsh offers can save you a lot of time. Zsh comes with a comprehensive completion system that has out-of-the-box support for SSH hostnames, Makefile targets, command-line arguments (for example, for MPlayer and configure scripts) and in general more than you can shake a stick at.

Among its fancier of extensions are:

ls -d *(/) # list directories
ls *(m0) # list files modified today
!$ # insert last argument of previous command
ls foo{1..3} # expands to ls foo1 foo2 foo3
These are only a fraction of its additional features. For a larger overview, consult zsh-lovers.

fmt/par

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