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Amazon Has Launched Its Own GNU/Linux Distribution

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  • Amazon Has Launched Its Own Linux Distribution But It’s Not for Everyone

    Before you get too excited and try to install and run it, I must tell you that it’s not your regular Linux distribution like Ubuntu, Fedora or Debian. What is it then?

  • Amazon teases Bottlerocket, its take on Linux specifically for running containers

    Amazon Web Services has begun previewing Bottlerocket, a new open-source Linux distribution designed for running containers.

    There are two main ideas behind Bottlerocket. The first is to make it easier to automate OS updates by applying them in a single step, rather than package by package. According to AWS, this will also improve uptime "by minimizing update failures and enabling easy update rollbacks."

    The second part of the rationale is to strip down the OS so it only contains what is needed to run containers.

  • AWS launches Bottlerocket, a Linux-based OS for container hosting

    AWS has launched its own open-source operating system for running containers on both virtual machines and bare metal hosts. Bottlerocket, as the new OS is called, is basically a stripped-down Linux distribution that’s akin to projects like CoreOS’s now-defunct Container Linux and Google’s container-optimized OS. The OS is currently in its developer preview phase, but you can test it as an Amazon Machine Image for EC2 (and by extension, under Amazon EKS, too).

  • Bottlerocket: New Linux-Based OS By Amazon To Host And Run Containers

    The footprints of Linux are increasing day by day and the latest addition to this is the Bottlerocket. It is a Linux-based operating system built by Amazon Web Services. This open-source OS targets to host and run the containers on virtual machines or bare metal hosts.

    According to the Nucleus Research survey, Amazon is already a dominant platform with over 80% of the cloud-based containers running on AWS. Hence, Bottlerocket is a new and free addition that supports both the Kubernetes and Docker’s images.

  • Bottlerocket is a new Linux-based operating system by AWS for container hosting

    Introduced recently, Bottlerocket is a new Linux-based operating system built by Amazon Web Services (AWS) that is specifically catered to running containers on virtual machines or bare metal hosts. It has a number of features that can help ease the automation of OS updates, improve security, and help with the integration and deployment of containers.

    First, unlike most operating systems today that update on a package-by-package basis, updates to Bottlerocket are applied in a single step. Also, the OS uses an image-based model. This ensures that updates can also be rolled back in their entirety, if necessary. This results in increased uptime for container applications, seamless fleet-wide updates, and lower error rates.

  • Amazon AWS Launches Linux-Based Bottlerocket For Hosting Containers

    AWS open-sourced Bottlerocket today as an open-source operating system for container hostings. Bottlerocket is a stripped-down Linux OS that supports Docker images and other OCI-supported platforms. Bottlerocket relies upon an image model rather than a package update system. Bottlerocket also makes some other interesting design choices like using DM-VERITY with a predominantly read-only file-system. They also disable SSH and shell support to the OS itself in the name of security, among other measures.

  • AWS launches Bottlerocket of a container host

    AWS has pulled the covers off Bottlerocket, a new Linux-based operating system for hosting and running containers on virtual machines or bare metal hosts.

    According to AWS chief evangelist Jeff Barr, the project “reflects much of what we have learned over the years” and supports Docker images and others conforming to the Open Container Initiative image format.

    AWS’s new offering apparently applies updates in a single step which contrasts with the usual package-wise approach and lends itself better to automation via the container orchestrators it also integrates with. Should an update fail, leaving the system unable to reboot to the new image, Bottlerocket is said to automatically roll back, while workload failures can trigger workflows for manual rollbacks.

  • AWS debuts Bottlerocket, an open-source operating system for container apps

    Amazon Web Services Inc. today announced the debut of a new, open-source operating system for software containers that runs on bare metal servers or virtual machines.

    AWS Bottlerocket is currently available in preview, and is a stripped down operating system comprised of only the components that are absolutely essential to get containers up and running. It supports both Docker images and others that conform to the Open Container Initiative or OCI image format.

AWS Adds Lightweight Linux Instance to Container Services

  • AWS Adds Lightweight Linux Instance to Container Services

    Amazon Web Services (AWS) has added a lightweight instance of Linux it calls Bottlerocket to the container services it makes available on its public cloud.

    Deepak Singh, vice president of compute services for AWS, says that beyond simply providing a way to host containers that consume less memory, Bottlerocket will make it easier for IT teams to recover from failures because the amount of time required to reconstruct the operating system using a container scheduler such as Kubernetes will be substantially less. Rather than relying on a traditional package update system, Bottlerocket makes use of an image-based model that allows for rapid and complete rollbacks of updates. That approach also makes it easier to apply updates across a fleet of instances of Bottlerocket.

Amazon: Linux-based Bottlerocket is our new OS

AWS has launched a Linux OS

  • AWS has launched a Linux OS

    Amazon’s cloud business, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has announced the launch of a new open-source operating system designed to run containers on both virtual machines and bare metal hosts.

    Called Bottlerocket, the operating system is still in the developer review phase, with anyone interested in testing it out can do so as an Amazon Image Machine for EC2.

    As explained on the Bottlerocket website, most customers nowadays run containerised applications on general-purpose operating systems that are updated package-by-package. That makes updates to the operating system tough to automate.

    Bottlerocket addresses this challenge by applying updates in a single step, rather than package-by-package.

AWS’s New Open Source OS “Bottlerocket”: A Baby RHEL Competitor?

  • AWS’s New Open Source OS “Bottlerocket”: A Baby RHEL Competitor?

    AWS has released a new open source, Linux-based open source operating system (OS) designed specifically for running containers in the cloud.

    (Containers are units of software that package up code and its dependencies so applications can run across most computing environments).

    The cloud heavyweight, which claims that 80 percent of all cloud-based containers are running on AWS, already offers its Amazon Linux OS, but this is restricted to running solely in AWS. (It competes with Ubuntu, Windows, and others).

    The new OS, dubbed “Bottlerocket”, has been designed firmly with those running containers in mind however. Written mostly in Rust, it can be used for running containers on virtual machines or bare metal hosts.

    It integrates with existing container orchestrators, e.g. Kubernetes, and supports images that conform to the Open Container Initiative (OCI) image format. Bottlerocket is being released under a dual (take your pick) Apache 2.0 or MIT licence.

Amazon Introduces a Linux-Based OS for Container Hosting

  • Amazon Introduces a Linux-Based OS for Container Hosting: Bottlerocket

    Recently, Amazon announced, a new Linux-based open-source operating system (OS) called Bottlerocket, which is purpose-built to run containers. Bottlerocket is currently in public preview as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) for Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for customers to try out.

    [...]

    Bottlerocket includes support for use with Amazon EKS, and according to the announcement, Amazon will soon support Amazon ECS. Furthermore, the tech giant is aiming to release Bottlerocket to the general public later this year.
    Lastly, customers can start using Bottlerocket now by launching Amazon EC2 instances with the Bottlerocket AMI, and joining them to an Amazon EKS cluster following the QuickStart guide.

Amazon Introduces Bottlerocket, a Linux-Based OS for Container

  • Amazon Introduces Bottlerocket, a Linux-Based OS for Container Hosting

    Amazon has announced a new Linux-based open-source operating system (OS) called Bottlerocket, which is purpose-built to run containers. Bottlerocket is currently in public preview as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) for Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for customers to experiment with.

    The tech giant designed and optimized Bottlerocket specifically for use as a container host, and it comes with a single-step update mechanism. Furthermore, Bottlerocket only includes essential software to run containers. Jeff Barr, chief evangelist for AWS, stated in a blog post on Bottlerocket...

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