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A quick review of Knoppix 5.1, part 2

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Linux
Reviews

It's impossible to write a decent review of any complex distribution, let alone Knoppix. These few posts are a quick pass at features that caught my eye while I had Knoppix up and running. This time I'm going to look at two IDEs, Eclipse and MonoDevelop.

Everybody should know what Eclipse is by now. Along with Sun's NetBeans, it's one of two of the best open and free IDEs on the market. Eclipse, written in Java, started life as a Java IDE. Over time it has grown into a development platform for C and C++, SQL (and database management in general), various dynamic languages such as Perl, Python, Php, and Ruby, as well as software engineering in general.

Mono is all about developing C# applications under non-Windows operating environments, especially Linux. You can develop and build C# applications that can move with relative ease between Linux and Windows. I'm not familiar with how deep the compatibility goes between Microsoft's C# and .Net under Windows and Mono's C# and .Net implementation under Linux.

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