See the total lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

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Sci/Tech

Without a total eclipse in almost two-and-one-half years, sky gazers will be able to observe a total lunar eclipse on Saturday, March 3, 2007 from the eastern Americas, the United Kingdom, Europe, Africa, Iceland, Greenaldn, Arctic, the Middle East in western Asia.

A total lunar eclipse is a complete obscuring of the full Moon by the Earth’s shadow due to light from the Sun. It occurs when the Moon becomes darkened as it passes through the Earth’s red shadow. In the initial partial eclipse phase, the Moon will be dimmed by the Earth’s outer shadow, or penumbra. Later, the Moon enters the Earth’s inner shadow, or umbra—at which time it becomes a total lunar eclipse.

The eclipse begins at 22:43:49 universal time (UT = EST – 5 hours, or about 17:44 EST, or 5:44 p.m. EST) and ends at 23:58:01 UT (about 6:58 p.m. EST), with the maximum amount of eclipse being at 23:20:56 UT (about 6:21 p.m. EST). Thus, it is expected to last just over one hour, 14 minutes.

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