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How I connect with non-English speakers about open source

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Interviews

One of the wonderful things about open source is the large community of writers contributing to our shared knowledge base. Not surprisingly, much of this is written in English; but there is also a well-served demand for open source-related information in other languages.

I first encountered Victorhck through his kind and thoughtful comments on Opensource.com, then learned that he has translated some of our content into Spanish and published it on his blog, Victorhck in the Free World. I find a lot of really useful info on his blog, such as articles about Vim and openSUSE and a lot of excellent reference material. I particularly like his overviews of topics, like this article about open source/libre technical materials.

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