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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Fedora program update 2020-12

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. I’ll be on PTO next week, so there will be no program update on 27 March.

  • No Culture Clash in the Marriage of IBM and Red Hat

    It's been nearly nine months since the marriage between IBM and Red Hat was finalized. We decided to check in and see how the newlyweds are getting along.

  • Red Hat's Peter Hutterer: It's templates all the way down

    We all know that CI/CD really helps with finding bugs early. If you don't know that yet, insert a jedi handwave before the previous sentence and now you do. GitLab is the git forge now used by freedesktop.org and it comes with a built-in CI system. I'm leaving out the difficult bits such as actually setting the thing up because this is obviously all handled by Heinzelmännchen and just readily available, hooray. I'm also going to assume that you roughly know how to write GitLab CI jobs or, failing that, at least know how to read YAML without screaming. So for this post, we start with the basic problem that your .gitlab-ci.yml is getting unwieldy, repetitive or generally just kinda sucks to maintain. Which is roughly where libinput and libevdev were a while back which caused Benjamin to start the ci-templates.

    Now, what do we want? (other than a COVID-19 cure) Reproducible tests, possibly on different distributions, with the same base system across tests. For my repos the goal was basically "test on the common distributions to catch certain bugs early". [1] For Mesa, the requirement is closer to "have a fixed set of images that 'never' change so tests are reproducible". Both goals have much in common.

  • Kogito 0.8.0 features online editors and cloud-native business automation

    Kogito is a cloud-native business automation solution that offers a powerful, developer-friendly experience. Based on production-tested open source projects Drools and jBPM, Kogito has business rules and processes down to a science. Kogito also aligns with popular lightweight runtimes such as Quarkus and Spring Boot to support developers building business-driven applications.

  • Call for Code: Water sustainability data sets

    Note: There is a webinar on March 25, 2020, organized by Agreenium (l’Institut agronomique, vétérinaire et forestier de France), UN-ESCAP (United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific), and FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) on how can we better measure and reduce post-harvest losses worldwide, especially in Southeast Asia countries. Join the webinar and share your thoughts and ideas! The webinar is at 2:30 PM (CET) and 8:30 AM US Eastern. Get more information about the webinar here. The session is the first in a series.

    [...]

    The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open data-sharing platform managed by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. In the exchange, you will find a climate change data set for each country that is derived from world bank data. The climate change data sets typically track indicators such as arable land, land under cereal production, and fertilizer consumption over a number of years. The indicators will vary from country to country, but will help you tell a story around your solution. You can find and download the climate change country data sets by selecting a location or by using the search option.

  • The 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge takes on COVID-19

    Nearly one month ago, together with Creator David Clark Cause and in partnership with United Nations Human Rights and the Linux Foundation, we announced climate change as the theme for the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge. In that brief period, much has changed. COVID-19 (Coronavirus) has spread across the world with unprecedented effect and now has the potential to become the greatest crisis of modern times. From its inception, Call for Code was created to take on society’s most pressing issues, which is why we are expanding this year’s Challenge to address both climate change and COVID-19, two urgent crises that have the power to compromise our health, our planet, and our survival. We’re asking developers, data scientists, and problem solvers to answer the Call.

    [...]

    As previously planned, today we are revealing our 2020 Call for Code Challenge climate change starter kits (see here). These three quick-start guides explain the individual problems people and communities are facing, and help you start creating applications tied to easy-to-understand use cases in just minutes.

    To help define the specific situations caused by climate change where your innovations could be most helpful, a few weeks ago IBM partnered with the world’s leading humanitarian experts for our kickoff event in Geneva at the historic Palais Wilson, Headquarters of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Together with UN humanitarian experts, and eminent technologists from Red Hat, JP Morgan Chase, Persistent Systems, Unity Technologies, NearForm, and Johnson & Johnson, we collaborated to create our three climate change starter kits.

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