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AMD: System76 Laptops, PPIN and Linux 5.7 Graphics Driver Code

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  • System76 May Offer AMD Ryzen Laptops When They Begin Their Own Manufacturing

    System76 is preparing to begin shipping their new Lemur Pro laptop in early April. This will be their most open laptop yet albeit still based on Intel. But it looks like when they move on with their ambitious plans to begin manufacturing their own devices, we may finally see a System76 AMD-powered laptop.

    The new Lemur Pro is arriving in early April and talks up ten hours of video playback time, light Internet activity for 16 hours, or Vim coding for 21 hours off their expanded battery. The new laptop features Intel 10th Gen Core i5/i7 CPU options, a 14.1-inch 1080p display, up to 40GB of DDR4 memory, dual M.2 SSDs, and USB 3.1 Type-C + USB 3.0 Type A.

  • AMD Plumbing Linux Support For Reading The CPU's Protected Processor Identification Number (PPIN)

    Going back to Ivy Bridge processors, Intel has supported "PPIN" as the Protected Processor Identification Number as a globally unique identification number set in the factory. It turns out recent AMD CPUs are also supporting PPIN and that reading their value is about to be supported on Linux.

    The Protected Processor Identification Number (PPIN) is effectively a unique serial number for each processor. One of the intended use-cases for PPIN is in large data centers and multi-socket servers to be able to more easily identify a particular CPU, especially in case of problems. At least in Intel's case, Intel can also translate a customer's PPIN number back into the fab and production run of that particular CPU along with any other internal data in isolating any issues. Intel has supported reading the PPIN under Linux for years and plumbed it into the MCE (Machine Check Exception) code for allowing server administrators to potentially more easily identify a particular CPU in the event of problems as well as tracking CPU inventory.

  • AMD Begins Focusing On Bug Fixes For Linux 5.7 Graphics Driver Code

    Passing the point that new feature code is generally permitted into DRM-Next for in turn hitting the next mainline kernel merge window, AMD's open-source graphics driver developers have been turning their attention to bug fixes for all the new feature code set for Linux 5.7.

System76 Lemur Pro is a 2.2 pound Linux laptop

System76 formally tease their new 'Lemur Pro' laptop

  • System76 formally tease their new 'Lemur Pro' laptop as their most open yet

    System76, Linux hardware and software vendor has today formally begun teasing the new 'Lemur Pro' laptop and it's their most open yet.

    With a price that will start at $1099 it's not going to be a low-end machine, far from it, sounds like a sweet unit for many uses. System76 say you will be able to "Watch all of Lord of the Rings in 10 hours. Read Wikipedia articles for 16 hours or write code in VIM for 21 hours straight…without plugging in", at the default brightness level. Pretty good sounding battery life, compared with my own laptop lasting all of 2 hours doing anything.

System76 Lemur Pro is an Ubuntu Linux workhorse laptop

  • System76 Lemur Pro is an Ubuntu Linux workhorse laptop

    System76 sells a lot of different types of computers, including desktops, laptops, and servers -- all come pre-loaded with either Ubuntu or the Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS Linux distributions. While the company's hand-crafted Thelio desktops are probably its most exciting machines, the majority consumers are probably better served by a laptop. Let's be honest, while hardcore power users and gamers will certainly want a desktop, notebooks are more functional for the average computer user, as it allows them to easily work in different locations.

    With all of that said, System76 has several laptop models, ranging from under $1,000 for, say, the fairly basic "Galago Pro," to well over $2,000 for the high-end "Adder WS" portable workstation. In other words, there are many models to meet the needs of many -- including both budget and power perspectives.

System76 Announces Lemur Pro Linux Laptop with Insane Battery

  • System76 Announces Lemur Pro Linux Laptop with Insane Battery Life

    Called Lemur Pro, the new Linux laptop is specifically supposed to impress with its battery life, and according to System76, it really does, as it lets you “watch all of Lord of the Rings in 10 hours” or “write code in VIM for 21 hours straight.” All without plugging in, of course.

    The new Lemur Pro laptop come with a choice of two processors, both of them part of the 10th Gen Intel Core lineup. So customers can choose between the i5-10210U and the i7-10510U, with the latter obviously being the more powerful (and more expensive) version.

System76 launches Lemur Pro, its lightest Linux laptop

  • System76 launches Lemur Pro, its lightest Linux laptop

    System76 has been manufacturing Linux-based PCs for over a decade, and the company continues to pump out new systems for those who prefer the "alternative" operating system to Windows hegemony. With its new Lemur Pro laptop, the company adds to its already formidable lineup of notebooks, desktops, and servers. At just 2.2 pounds (and a mere 0.61 inches thick), the Lemur Pro is System76's lightest laptop to date. Between the slim form factor and the latest Intel processors -- not to mention the 73 Whr battery -- the Lemur Pro promises great battery life, though the company is only providing claims in a cheeky fashion (10 hours to watch the Lord of the Rings trilogy, 16 hours for reading Wikipedia, 21 hours for coding with VIM).

System76’s Next Lightest Linux Laptop Starting At $1,099

  • Lemur Pro: System76’s Next Lightest Linux Laptop Starting At $1,099

    The last six months are filled with a lot of headlines by the announcements of new Linux-based laptops. Various new players have emerged to lure the new audiences with pre-installed Linux distros in their high powered laptops.

    Along the similar lines, System76 has again come up with its new lightest laptop, Lemur Pro. Though they are an old player building Linux based desktop, server, or laptop, they’re now including their own services more. Hence, the latest Lemur Pro targets to bring high battery power and lightweight with either their own pre-loaded Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS or Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, Radeon, and Mesa

  • Sony Engineer Talks Up Using Flutter + Wayland For Their Embedded Interfaces - Phoronix

    A Sony engineer confirmed at this week's Embedded Linux Conference Europe that the company has begun using the Flutter toolkit atop Wayland as their means of developing user-interfaces on embedded systems. Hidenori Matsubayashi of Sony talked at ELCE 2020 about their evaluation of different GUI toolkits for embedded use and ultimately how they fell for Flutter and Wayland. They came to that decision when evaluating the likes of Electron, Qt, GTK, WebKit/Chromium with WebView, and the many other options out there. Their design requirements were needing to be able to make "beautiful" user interfaces, support easy development, exhibit low CPU and RAM requirements, work across display servers and software stacks, and the toolkit must allow use within proprietary software.

  • Linux Support Expectations For The AMD Radeon RX 6000 Series

    Lisa Su is about to begin the presentation unveiling the much anticipated Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" (RDNA 2) graphics cards. This article will be updated live as the event progresses but first up let's recap the current Linux open-source driver state for these forthcoming graphics cards. Under the codename Sienna Cichlid, the Linux support for the next-generation Navi graphics cards have been underway going back to the middle of the year. There is initial support for the next-gen hardware within the recent released Linux 5.9 kernel and Mesa 20.2. This still puts it just out-of-reach for seeing out-of-the-box support in the likes of Ubuntu 20.10 given the 5.8 kernel so the user must manually move to the newer kernel. At least with the likes of Fedora Workstation 33 there will be Linux 5.9 as a stable release update. Also important to the driver equation is needing to be using LLVM 11.0+ for the GFX10.3 back-end target and also ensuring to have the latest linux-firmware for the binary microcode files needed for GPU initialization. So at least going into this launch it's great there is at least open-source driver support available but not necessarily easy reach for all users right now. By the time of the spring 2021 Linux distributions like Ubuntu 21.04 there should be nice out-of-the-box support for those wanting good support without any hassles. Or if you are on an enterprise distribution like RHEL/CentOS or SUSE Linux Enterprise or Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, AMD should be providing their usual Radeon Software for Linux packaged driver that ships updated user and kernel-space components for deploying their driver that way.

  • Mesa 20.3 Supports Intel Alder Lake Gen12 Graphics - Phoronix

    Last week Intel open-source engineers began publishing Linux kernel patches for the "Alder Lake S" graphics support. That work should be found in the Linux 5.11 cycle being christened as stable in early 2021. In user-space, Alder Lake graphics patches also appeared for their OpenCL / oneAPI Level Zero compute stack and now merged into Mesa 20.3 as well for OpenGL / Vulkan support. Given that Alder Lake is using Intel Xe "Gen12" graphics as found already for Tiger Lake and Rocket Lake, the actual driver-side enablement is quite minimal thanks to employing the existing code paths. The Alder Lake "ADL-S" support was merged into Mesa on Tuesday and is just 20 lines of new code. That consists of just adding the new PCI IDs and then the family bits for the Alder Lake family and indicating they make use of Gen12 features.

today's howtos

  • How to Boot Raspberry Pi 4 from USB SSD? – Linux Hint

    Raspberry Pi 4 firmware supports USB boot. You can easily boot your favorite operating system on your Raspberry Pi 4 from a USB HDD, SSD, or a USB thumb drive instead of the traditional microSD card. [...] In this section, I am going to show you how to enable USB boot on Raspberry Pi 4. Before you can enable USB boot on your Raspberry Pi 4, you must update all the existing packages of your Raspberry Pi OS. So that we can update the firmware and enable USB boot.

  • Monitoring Temperature in Raspberry Pi – Linux Hint

    Monitoring temperatures may be a requirement in many of your Raspberry Pi projects. It is relatively easy to do in Raspberry Pi and the components required for this project are not too costly.This article shows you how to use the DS18B20 digital thermometer module to monitor temperature using Raspberry Pi. The article also demonstrates how to create a web app to display the temperature.

  • Raspberry PI VPN Server with PiVPN - peppe8o

    Raspberry PI can provide a number of linux services able to easily solve problems to manage your home network with cheap solutions. Using an OS based on Debian, it can run Open Source software and drastically help you with your home ICT needs as well as small office needs. A common need for increasing networking security and access your home services from outside is having a VPN (Virtual Private Network) server which grants secure access from an external network to your internal services. A simple solution to implement OpenVPN or WireGuard (the 2 most widely known VPN open source serices) is using the convenient PiVPN setup tool. In this tutorial I’m going to show you how to setup a VPN server with a cheap Raspberry PI Zero Wusing PiVPN and send certificate via email. This guide applies also to newer Raspberry PI boards.

  • Understanding YAML for Ansible | Enable Sysadmin

    If you write or use Ansible playbooks, then you're used to reading YAML configuration files. YAML can be deceptively simple and yet strangely overwhelming all at once, especially when you consider the endless possible Ansible modules at your disposal. It feels like it should be easy to jot down a few options in a YAML file and then run Ansible, but what options does your favorite module require? And why are some key-value pairs while others are lists? YAML for Ansible can get complex, so understanding how Ansible modules translate to YAML is an important part of getting better at both. Before you can understand how YAML works for Ansible modules, you must understand the basics of YAML. If you don't know the difference between a mapping block and a sequence block in YAML, read this quick introduction to the basics of YAML article.

  • Using TRIM and DISCARD with SSDs attached to RAID controllers | Enable Sysadmin

    SSDs are now commonplace and have been the default choice for performance-oriented disks in the enterprise and consumer environments for the past few years. SSDs are cool and fast but most people on high-end machines face this dilemma: My SSD is behind a RAID controller which doesn't expose the device's DISCARD or TRIM capabilities. How do I discard the blocks to keep the best SSD performance? Here's a trick to do just that without having to disassemble your machine. Recent improvements in SSD firmware have made the need for the applications writing to SSDs less stringent to use DISCARD/TRIM. There are, however, some cases in which you may need to have the filesystem inform the drive of the blocks which it discarded. Perhaps you have TLC (3bits per cell) or QLC (4bits per cell) drives instead of the usually more expensive enterprise-class SLC or MLC drives (the latter are less susceptible to a performance drop since they put aside more extra blocks to help with overwrites when the drive is at capacity). Or maybe you once filled your SSD to 100%, and now you cannot get the original performance/IOPS back.

  • How to play Among Us on Linux

    Among Us is incredibly popular, but, sadly, the game does not have a native port for Linux. Thankfully, with a little tweaking, it is possible to get Among Us working on the Linux platform!

  • How to add file folders to the XFCE4 menu

    XFCE4 is an excellent Linux desktop environment, but one of its shortcomings is that users aren’t able to access folders directly from the menu like other modern desktops such as Gnome, KDE, Cinnamon, etc.

  • How To Install Apache JMeter on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Apache JMeter on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, The Apache JMeter application is open-source software, a 100% pure Java application designed to load test functional behavior and measure performance. It was originally designed for testing Web Applications but has since expanded to other test functions. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Apache JMeter on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (blueman), Fedora (nodejs), Gentoo (firefox), openSUSE (kleopatra), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), SUSE (apache2, binutils, firefox, pacemaker, sane-backends, spice, spice-gtk, tomcat, virt-bootstrap, xen, and zeromq), and Ubuntu (ca-certificates, mariadb-10.1, mariadb-10.3, netty, openjdk-8, openjdk-lts, perl, and tomcat6).

  • Italian energy giant Enel hit by Windows NetWalker ransomware

    The Italian multinational energy giant Enel Group appears to have been hit by cyber criminals using the Windows NetWalker ransomware, and some screenshots of data stolen from the company has been posted on the dark web.

  • What would you risk for free Honey? | Almost Secure

    Honey is a popular browser extension built by the PayPal subsidiary Honey Science LLC. It promises nothing less than preventing you from wasting money on your online purchases. Whenever possible, it will automatically apply promo codes to your shopping cart, thus saving your money without you lifting a finger. And it even runs a reward program that will give you some money back! Sounds great, what’s the catch? With such offers, the price you pay is usually your privacy. With Honey, it’s also security. The browser extension is highly reliant on instructions it receives from its server. I found at least four ways for this server to run arbitrary code on any website you visit. So the extension can mutate into spyware or malware at any time, for all users or only for a subset of them – without leaving any traces of the attack like a malicious extension release. [...] In the end, I found that the Honey browser extension gives its server very far reaching privileges, but I did not find any evidence of these privileges being misused. So is it all fine and nothing to worry about? Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. While the browser extension’s codebase is massive and I certainly didn’t see all of it, it’s possible to make definitive statements about the extension’s behavior. Unfortunately, the same isn’t true for a web server that one can only observe from outside. The fact that I only saw non-malicious responses doesn’t mean that it will stay the same way in future or that other people will make the same experience. In fact, if the server were to invade users’ privacy or do something outright malicious, it would likely try to avoid detection. One common way is to only do it for accounts that accumulated a certain amount of history. As security researchers like me usually use fairly new accounts, they won’t notice anything. Also, the server might decide to limit such functionality to countries where litigation is less likely. So somebody like me living in Europe with its strict privacy laws won’t see anything, whereas US citizens would have all of their data extracted. But let’s say that we really trust Honey Science LLC given its great track record. We even trust PayPal who happened to acquire Honey this year. Maybe they really only want to do the right thing, by any means possible. Even then there are still at least two scenarios for you to worry about. The Honey server infrastructure makes an extremely lucrative target for hackers. Whoever manages to gain control of it will gain control of the browsing experience for all Honey users. They will be able to extract valuable data like credit card numbers, impersonate users (e.g. to commit ad fraud), take over users’ accounts (e.g. to demand ransom) and more. Now think again how much you trust Honey to keep hackers out. But even if Honey had perfect security, they are also a US-based company. And that means that at any time a three letter agency can ask them for access, and they will have to grant it. That agency might be interested in a particular user, and Honey provides the perfect infrastructure for a targeted attack. Or the agency might want data from all users, something that they are also known to do occasionally. Honey can deliver that as well.

Android Leftovers