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Android Leftovers

More in Tux Machines

Plasma Mobile: How to help us!

We often get asked: “how long until the 1.0 release?”. Or: “how far away is Plasma Mobile 1.0?”. The usual answer to both these question is “It’ll be ready when it is ready”. But, really, how do we know that it is ready? Recently some of us prepared a check list of items which we consider necessary before we can declare Plasma Mobile “ready” or at rc1 status. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Mesa 20.0.3 Released With Latest Open-Source Graphics Driver Fixes

    While many of you are users of Mesa Git for experiencing the bleeding-edge graphics drivers especially if you are a gamer wanting peak performance, for those on the Mesa stable series the Mesa 20.0.3 update has now shipped. Mesa 20.0.3 is the latest bi-weekly point release for back-porting the fixes to this Q1'2020 stable series.

  • Adrien Plazas: A Coloring API for GTK

    This week we had the Design Tools Hackfest 2020, virtualized because of COVID-19, where we discussed that recoloring API. We came up with something I think is interesting enough to discuss more widely.

  • [Former Canonical manager] Dustin Kirkland: Coordinated Launch Cycles at Apex

    I joined Apex Clearing last year, having spent the previous 20 years as a software engineer, product manager, and executive, mostly around open source software, including Ubuntu, OpenStack, and Kubernetes. Albeit IBM, Canonical and Google differ from fintech on many levels, these operating systems and cloud infrastructure technology platforms share a number of similarities with Apex's software-as-a-service platform. Moreover, there also exists some literal overlap: we’re heavy users of both Ubuntu and Kubernetes here at Apex. Ubuntu, OpenStack, and Kubernetes all share similar, predictable, time-based release cycles. Ubuntu has released every April and October, since October of 2004 – that's 32 major software platform releases, on time, every time, over 16 years. Ubuntu has set the bar for velocity, quality, and predictability in the open source world. OpenStack’s development processes have largely mirrored Ubuntu’s, with many of the early project leaders having been ex-Ubuntu engineers and managers. OpenStack, too, has utilized a 6-month development cycle, since 2010, now on its 20th release. Kubernetes came along in 2014, and sought to increase the pace a bit, with quarterly release cycles. Kubernetes is a little bit looser with dates than Ubuntu or OpenStack, but has generally cranked out 4 quality releases per year, over the last 6 years. I’ve been involved in each of these projects at some level, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed coaching a number of early stage start-ups on how to apply these principles to their product development methodologies.

  • Ulrike Uhlig: Breaking the chain reaction of reactions to reactions

    Each of these interactions is embedded in larger society, and, as said above, we learn these roles from childhood. Therefore, we perpetually reproduce power structures, and learnt behavior. I doubt that fixing this on an individual level is sufficient to transform our interactions outside of small groups, families or work places. Although that would be a good start. We can see that the triangle holds together because the Victim, seemingly devoid of a way to handle their own needs, transfers care of their needs to the Rescuer, thereby giving up on their autonomy. The Rescuer is provided by the Victim with a sense of autonomy, knowledge, and power, that only works while denying the Victim their autonomy. At the same time, the Persecutor denies everyone else's needs and autonomy, and feels powerful by dismissing others. I've recently mentioned the importance of autonomy in order to avoid burnout, and as a means to control one's own life. If the Rescuer can acknowledge being in the triangle, and give the Victim autonomy, by supporting them with compassion, empathy, and guidance, and at the same time respecting their own boundaries, we could find even more ways to escape the drama triangle.

GNOME 3.36 and 3.38

Launched three weeks ago on March 11th, the GNOME 3.36 “Gresik” desktop environment brings numerous new features and performance enhancements, including refreshed login and unlock screens, a more polished GNOME Shell, and a new Extensions app for managing GNOME Shell extensions. GNOME 3.36 also revamps the calendar popover with a built-in Do Not Disturb feature, reorganizes the Power off / Log out options to be more accessible, adds a password peeking feature to most auth dialogs, and redesigns many panels of the GNOME Control Center. Read more Also: GNOME 3.38 Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 16