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openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1

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SUSE

Last week I released openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1 and installed it on my laptop as well. There are not many user visible changes in the system, in most cases it looks like 10.2. But under the hood a number of changes have been done that will everybody:

* The GNOME packages are now installed to /usr and not to /opt/gnome anymore
* KDE was updated to KDE 3.5.6.
* Linux Kernel updated to 2.6.20

Full Post.


Editor's Note: For those interested, my report will be published later this evening. I apologize for the delay, but I had other obligations as well as server problems over the weekend.

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