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Kernel: Dentry Negativity, Filesystems and Linux Plumbers Conference

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Linux
  • Dentry negativity

    Back in 2017, Waiman Long posted a patch set placing limits on the number of "negative dentries" stored by the kernel. The better part of three years later, that work continues with, seemingly, no better prospects for getting into the mainline. It would be understandable, though, if many people out there don't really know what negative dentries are or why kernel developers care about them. That, at least, can be fixed, even if the underlying problem seems to be more difficult.
    A "dentry" in the Linux kernel is the in-memory representation of a directory entry; it is a way of remembering the resolution of a given file or directory name without having to search through the filesystem to find it. The dentry cache speeds lookups considerably; keeping dentries for frequently accessed names like /tmp, /dev/null, or /usr/bin/tetris saves a lot of filesystem I/O.

    A negative dentry is a little different, though: it is a memory of a filesystem lookup that failed. If a user types "more cowbell" and no file named cowbell exists, the kernel will create a negative dentry recording that fact. Should our hypothetical user, being a stubborn type, repeat that command, the kernel will encounter the negative dentry and reward said user — who is unlikely to be grateful, users are like that — with an even quicker "no such file or directory" error.

  • Filesystem-oriented flags: sad, messy and not going away

    Over the last decade, the addition of a "flags" argument to all new system calls, even if no flags are actually needed at the outset, has been widely adopted as a best practice. The result has certainly been greater API extensibility, but we have also seen a proliferation of various types of flags for related system calls. For calls related to files and filesystems, in particular, the available flags have reached a point where some calls will need as many as three arguments for them rather than just one.
    One set of filesystem-oriented flags will be familiar to almost anybody who has worked with the Unix system-call API: the O_ flags supported by calls like open(). These flags affect how the call operates in a number of ways; O_CREAT will cause the named file to be opened if it does not already exist, O_NOFOLLOW causes the open to fail if the final component in the name is a symbolic link, O_NONBLOCK requests non-blocking operation, and so on. Some of those flags affect the lookup process (O_NOFOLLOW, for example) while others, like O_NONBLOCK, affect how the file descriptor created by the call will behave. All are part of one flag namespace that is recognized by all of the open() family of system calls.

    open() is one way to create a new entry in a directory; link() is another. When the time came to add flags to link(), the linkat() system call was born; this system call also follows the other relatively new pattern of accepting a file descriptor for the directory in which the operation is to be performed. linkat() has a separate flag namespace (the "AT_ flags") with flags like AT_SYMLINK_FOLLOW, which is the opposite of O_NOFOLLOW. There is also an AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW that is not recognized by linkat(), but which is understood by calls like fchmodat() and execveat(). There are more AT_ flags, such as AT_NO_AUTOMOUNT, supported by the relatively new statx() system call.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: LPC 2020 Call for Refereed-Track Proposals

    Note: We are still hoping to hold the conference as scheduled, but we are continually monitoring the pandemic situation. For current Covid-19 updates, please see our website
    https://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/#covid-19

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed-Track Proposals for the 2020 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on August 25-27 in conjunction with the Kernel Summit and Linux Maintainers Summit, which takes place on August 28th.

    Refereed track presentations are 50 minutes in length (which includes time for questions and discussion) and should focus on a specific aspect of the “plumbing” in the Linux system. Examples of Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, toolchains, container runtimes, core libraries, windowing systems, management tools, device support, media creation/playback, accelerators, hardware interaction, and so on. The best presentations are not about finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: LPC 2020 Call for Microconference Proposals

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Microconferences for the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on August 25-27 in conjunction with Kernel Summit and Linux Maintainers Summit, which takes place on August 28th.

    A microconference is a collection of collaborative sessions focused on problems in a particular area of Linux plumbing, which includes the kernel, libraries, utilities, services, UI, and so forth, but can also focus on cross-cutting concerns such as security, scaling, energy efficiency, toolchains, container runtimes, or a particular use case. Good microconferences result in solutions to these problems and concerns, while the best microconferences result in patches that implement those solutions.

    For more information on submitting a microconference proposal, visit our CfP page.

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