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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Part 2: How to enable Hardware Accelerators on OpenShift, SRO Building Blocks

    In Part 1: How to Enable Hardware Accelerators on OpenShift we gave a high-level overview of the Special Resource Operator (SRO) and a detailed view of the workflow on enabling hardware accelerators.

    Part 2 will go into detailed construction of the enablement, and explain which building blocks/features the SRO provides to make life easier.

    The most important part is the DriverContainer and its interaction with the cluster during deployment and updates. We will show how we can handle multiple DriverContainer vendors, and how SRO can manage them.

  • Storage infrastructure for everyone: Lowering the bar to installing Ceph

    The last few years have seen Ceph continue to mature in stability, scalability and performance to become a leading open source storage platform. However, getting started with Ceph has typically required the administrator learning automation products like Ansible first. While learning Ansible brings its own rewards, wouldn’t it be great if you could simply skip this step and just get on with learning and using Ceph?

    Red Hat Ceph Storage 4 introduces a GUI installation tool built on top of the Cockpit web console. Under the covers, we still rely on the latest iteration of the same trusted ceph-ansible installation flows that have been with us since 2016.

  • Hacking the video stream for BlueJeans on Linux

    Like most of the rest of the world, I'm working from home and stuck inside. I saw some folks who had virtual backgrounds setup on Zoom, and I wondered if something like that was possible for the videoconferencing service that my employer (Red Hat) uses, BlueJeans. The short answer is: No. Bluejeans has no native support for anything other than a regular video cam stream.

    But this is Linux. We don't stop at the short answer.

    I started thinking, surely, it has to be possible to "man in the middle" the video stream. And indeed, it is. I did all of this on Fedora 32 (x86_64), but it should work anywhere else.

  • Talking about containers, virtual machines, and orchestration

    Throughout the two episodes, we explored my own personal history in coming to work with containers. From the bare metal cloud to virtual machines, to starting to use Docker, to delving into cloud environments. And, as Docker became the basic environment for both desktop and server environments, I clearly saw how everything became standardized for us in or by containers.

    With the growth of microservices, the management of containers becomes nearly impossible. The orchestration of containers becomes a thing. So, the niche for Kubernetes and other systems like it come to light. Even while Kubernetes has seen very good adoption rates over the past two years, as developers start to tune their own microservices mesh, they notice a lack of functionality in the vanilla Kubernetes. Then, here comes Istio.

    Companies like Google, IBM, and Lyft founded Istio. Istio answers some of the requirements for dealing with mesh, such as advanced load balancing methods, A/B testing, canary deployments, versioning, enforcing poliices, or just simply monitoring the services.

    Next up in the history of containers and solving some of the issues with microservices mesh based applications is OKD, the Origin Community Distribution of Kubernetes. They are also looking into the advantages of simplified streamlined deployment, management, operations, and security provided by maintained version of Kubernetes. And, finally, merging Kubernetes with all of the above capabilities we have Red Hat OpenShift.

    If you are interested in containers (and Docker, Kubernetes, Istio, or Kubernets on Red Hat OpenShift), join Marek and other IBM Developer Advocates in their webinars and other events.

  • Harish Pillay 9v1hp: No. Internet voting is still a No Go.

    I was asked by a friend why is it that we can’t do voting over the Internet. With all of the digitisation being done globally, and the ongoing COVID-19 issue, shouldn’t Singapore – the Smart Nation – have the general elections (which is due no later than April 2021) be done over the Internet?

    One word answer: No.

    Yes, you have done plenty of Internet banking transactions. You’ve sent money to phone numbers, you’ve received monies etc. You’ve bought stuff using your credit card over the Internet and received the goods. And yes Amazon, Alibaba, Paypal, eBay etc are multi-billion businesses that accept payments over the Internet. It is safe and it works.

    Why? Because of the simple transaction involved: you know what you paid – you can check the ledger and the recipient can check as well. E-commerce sites can see the transactions just as clearly as those involved in the transactions.

    There is no secrecy within a transaction here. There is secrecy across all transactions, but each participant in a transaction knows all the details.

    When you transfer $100 to a bank account over the Internet, you can check that it was delivered/received. You can check that your account was reduced by $100 and the recipient’s increased by $100.

    But if you are NOT part of a transaction, you have no idea what happened. So, global secrecy is enforced and that’s all well (hence money laundering, bribery etc thrives).

    The democratic process of voting has one critical thing that is different from the usual electronic transactions: the participants of the transaction DON’T KNOW WHAT TRANSPIRED because of vote secrecy.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Oh, the Irony! Chrome is Blocking Security Tool Nmap Downloads Considering it a Security Threat

    Nmap is a popular open-source tool created by Gordon Lyon used by security experts and network admins to analyze the network, find exploits, and keep it secure. However, it seems that for a day at least, Google Chrome blocked all Nmap downloads using its Safe Browsing service by labelling it as a threat. Even though this has been fixed quickly. For many visitors trying to download the tool, this must have been confusing. A software that’s more than a decade old is now suddenly considered as a threat?

  • Logging as a service isn't SIEM -- so what is it?

    Log management software is often confused or conflated with security information event management (SIEM) software. Both monitor and analyze system and application data, so vendors often blur the lines between the two categories, with many SIEM products including a log management module. Conversely, some log management vendors also have SIEM offerings that work with or supplement their logging products. The primary distinction between log management and SIEM is focus. SIEM tools prioritize data and metrics relevant to security, not the totality of an environment's system, user and application log output. Log management software and services provide a scalable, holistic platform to collect, manage, archive and analyze all of an IT environment's log output -- on premises and in the cloud.

  • Laptops given to British schools came preloaded with malware and talked to Russia when booted [iophk: Windows TCO]

    These devices have shipped over the past three to four weeks, though it is unclear how many of them are infected. One source at a school told The Register that the machines in question seemed to have been manufactured in late 2019 and appeared to have had their DfE-specified software installed last year.

  • Democrats seek answers on impact of Russian cyberattack on Justice Department, Courts [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The senators’ concerns come weeks after both the Justice Department and the U.S. Courts reported that they had been among the federal agencies compromised by the Russian attack on SolarWinds, which was uncovered in December but had been ongoing for more than a year.

    In a statement earlier this month, a DOJ spokesperson said around 3 percent of the agency’s employee email accounts had been “potentially accessed” as part of the breach, but that there was “no indication that any classified systems were accessed.” DOJ has more than 100,000 employees.

    The federal judiciary confirmed it was breached the same week as DOJ, noting in a statement that the AO’s Case Management/Electronic Files system had suffered an “apparent compromise,” with new procedures immediately put in place to file sensitive court documents.

  • Biden inherited one of the worst [cracks] in history. How will his administration respond?

    But that's the easy part. The SolarWinds [attack] — named for the Texas software company that Russia [cracked] in order to gain access to tens of thousands of its customers, many of them American businesses and federal agencies — ran undetected for at least nine months, siphoning off private information before it was discovered in December.

    At least five federal agencies have admitted they were affected. Several others have so far refused to comment. Few private companies have admitted to being victims, but experts say the working assumption is the number is in the hundreds.

    That's left cybersecurity experts with the labor-intensive task of combing through sensitive networks.

Android Leftovers

Schedule appointments with an open source alternative to Doodle

In previous years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 13 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021. Setting appointments with other people is difficult. Most of the time, we guess at a date and time and then start the "is this time bad for you? No, that time is bad for me, how about..." dance. It is easier with co-workers since you can see each others' calendars. You just have to find that magic spot that is good for almost everyone who needs to be on the call. However, for freelancers managing personal calendars, the dance is a routine part of setting up calls and meetings. Read more

This week in KDE: the Plasma 5.20 beta is here!

Well folks, you finally have a chance to test out Plasma 5.21, in beta form! Please do install it and find all the bugs we missed. Bug reports have already started pouring in, and we’ll fix them as fast as we can in the next month. [...] Kate now has a searchable HUD-style command palette that lets you trigger menu items with super speed! It’s activated using the Ctrl+Alt+I shortcut, and we’re investigating adding it to other KDE apps as well in the form of a re-usable framework component. Read more