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today's leftovers

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  • Need Viber on your Chromebook? For now, Linux is probably the answer

    Over the weekend, I received a message from a reader who was desperately trying to get Viber working on his Chromebook. What is Viber you ask? Yeah, I wasn’t exactly familiar with it either but over 1 billion people around the globe depend on Rakuten’s messaging platform for chat, calls and even video conferencing. The app itself looks really inviting and it appears to offer similar features to WhatsApp and many other chat apps.

  • Sparky named repos

    Developing and providing packages to Sparky based on Debian testing only was quite easy, it was just one branch, developed as a rolling release. No changes in repos required then.

    Everything changed after releasing Sparky on Debian stable and keeping the oldstable line as well.

    Every big upgrade, means from testing to a new stable, and stable to a new oldstable required manual changes in the repo lists.

  • Keeping Tech Skills Up to Date From Anywhere, Anytime

    The Linux Foundation has been a 100% remote workforce for many years, so we are lucky to be in the position where the COVID-19 pandemic has not impacted our ability to deliver training and certification solutions. As a non-profit organization, our mission has always been to provide high quality, affordable programs to those who want and need them.

  • Tricks for getting around your Linux file system
  • Configuring Red Hat Satellite and Capsule Server with a Custom SSL Certificate
  • Google Engineer Posts Latest Patches For MAC + Audit Policy Using eBPF

    One of the interesting innovations for the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine in recent times is the work by Google on supporting MAC and audit policy handling by it. This stems from currently custom real-time security data collection and analysis of Google servers internally for real-time threat protection and this patch-set is part of their work on allowing similar functionality in the upstream Linux kernel.

  • RADV Lands AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 Fix For DOOM Eternal On Linux Under Steam Play

    Doom Eternal was released this week by id Software as their first game atop the Vulkan-focused id Tech 7 engine. While it's another id Software game not seeing a native Linux port, with some tweaking the game can run under Steam Play / Proton. And now Mesa's RADV Vulkan driver has landed a fix for AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 era GPUs with a fix allowing those older graphics cards to handle this latest Doom title. 

  • NVIDIA Nsight Graphics 2020.2 Adds Vulkan GPU Trace Support

    NVIDIA has released a new feature update to their Nsight Graphics standalone developer tool for debugging and profiling applications/games built atop a variety of 3D APIs.

  • TTM Huge Page Table Entries Pending For Lowering Graphics Driver CPU Usage

    Longtime open-source Linux graphics developer Thomas Hellström of VMware has sent out a patch series aiming for Linux 5.7 or 5.8 to introduce support for huge and giant page-table entries for the TTM memory management code and TTM-enabled graphics drivers.

  • COVID-19 vs open source: How developers are fighting the virus [Ed: Just promoting the illusion that proprietary software monopolists from Microsoft now speak 'for' Open Source]

    Programmers are in a unique position where not only can they typically work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they can help lend a hand. Help fight COVID-19 and donate your computing power, help create a community app, and keep on social distancing!

  • Josh Bressers: Part 5: Which of these security problems do I need to care about?

    If you just showed up here, go back and start at the intro post, you’ll want the missing context before reading this article. Or not, I mean, whatever.

    I’ve spent the last few posts going over the challenges of security scanners. I think the most important takeaway is we need to temper our expectations. Even a broken clock is right twice a day. So assuming some of the security flaws reported are real, how can we figure out what we should be paying attention to?

  • The exFAT Filesystem Is Coming To Linux -- Paragon Software's Not Happy About It
  • The exFAT filesystem is coming to Linux—Paragon software’s not happy about it

    When software and operating system giant Microsoft announced its support for inclusion of the exFAT filesystem directly into the Linux kernel back in August, it didn't get a ton of press coverage. But filesystem vendor Paragon Software clearly noticed this month's merge of the Microsoft-approved, largely Samsung-authored version of exFAT into the VFS for-next repository, which will in turn merge into Linux 5.7—and Paragon doesn't seem happy about it.

    Yesterday, Paragon issued a press release about European gateway-modem vendor Sagemcom adopting its version of exFAT into an upcoming series of Linux-based routers. Unfortunately, it chose to preface the announcement with a stream of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) that wouldn't have looked out of place on Steve Ballmer's letterhead in the 1990s.

  • ESET releases business edition of endpoint antivirus for Linux

    ESET has launched the latest version of ESET Endpoint Antivirus for Linux joining ESET’s existing product range catering extensively to Windows and MacOS. The new version is designed to provide advanced protection from threats to organisations’ general desktops. Powered by the advanced ESET LiveGrid technology, the solution combines speed, accuracy and minimal system impact, leaving more system resources for the desktops’ vital tasks in order to maintain business continuity.

    The company said its latest version of ESET Endpoint Antivirus for Linux is designed to meet the high standard of protection necessary in a corporate network, and now offers the same cutting-edge protection that exists for other operating systems. Key features include real-time file protection, more efficient scanning and increased stability, as well as full compatibility with the ESET Security Management Center and ESET Cloud Administrator. The software is intuitive to manage and can be deployed immediately and seamlessly.

More in Tux Machines

LibreOffice 6.4.3 Release Candidate Version 1 Released Today!

LibreOffice 6.4.3 RC1 Released: LibreOffice is one of the best open-source text editors. LibreOffice comes as default application release of Linux OS. LibreOffice is developed by Team Document Foundation. Today they announced that the LibreOffice 6.4.3 RC1 version has been released. As per their calendar, LibreOffice 6.4.3 RC1 has been released exactly on today!. This RC1 version has many bugs fixes and tweaks in essential features. Read more

Unifont 13.0.01 Released

Unifont 13.0.01 is now available. This is a major release. Significant changes in this version include the addition of these new scripts in Unicode 13.0.0: U+10E80..U+10EBF: Yezidi, by Johnnie Weaver U+10FB0..U+10FDF: Chorasmian, by Johnnie Weaver U+11900..U+1195F: Dives Akuru, by David Corbett U+18B00..U+18CFF: Khitan Small Script, by Johnnie Weaver U+1FB00..U+1FBFF: Symbols for Legacy Computing, by Rebecca Bettencourt Read more

Programming: micro.sth, RProtoBuf, Perl and Python

  • Introducing micro.sth

    Many developers turn their noses up at PHP, but I have a soft spot for it. For me, it's the most approachable programming language by far. It feels intuitive in a way no other languages do, and it makes it possible to cobble together a working application with just a handful of lines of code. So whenever I can't find a tool for a specific job, I try to build one myself. The latest project of mine is a case in point. I was looking for a simple application for keeping a photographic diary, and I was sure that I'd be able to find an open-source tool for that. I searched high and low, but I came back empty-handed. Sure, there are plenty of static website generators, but I'd prefer something that doesn't require me to perform the write-generate-upload dance every time I want to post a quick update. And I need something that I can use not only to maintain a simple diary, but also store notes, manage tasks, and draft articles -- all this without getting bogged down by configuring templates, defining categories, and tweaking settings. And because I want most of my content to be private, I should be able to protect access to it with a password.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RProtoBuf 0.4.17: Robustified

    A new release 0.4.17 of RProtoBuf is now on CRAN. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol. This release contains small polishes related to the release 0.4.16 which added JSON support for messages, and switched to ByteSizeLong. This release now makes sure JSON functionality is only tested where available (on version 3 of the Protocol Buffers library), and that ByteSizeLong is only called where available (version 3.6.0 or later). Of course, older versions build as before and remain fully supported.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 53: Rotate Matrix and Vowel Strings

    These are some answers to the Week 53 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxi) stackoverflow python report
  • Python: Is And ==

    In Python, == compares the value of two variables and returns True as long as the values are equal.

today's howtos