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Contribute to open source healthcare projects for COVID-19

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Many of those that are familiar with the maker movement, including me, believe there is a significant opportunity to apply open source design principles and mass-scale collaborative distributed manufacturing technologies (like open source 3D printing) to at least partially overcome medical supply shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic. Already, an Italian hospital saved COVID-19 patients' lives by 3D printing valves for reanimation devices.

However, those designs were not open source, and hospitals still need to file paperwork to get to the STLs, needlessly wasting time, restricting the number of volunteers that could print the valves, and perhaps leading to unnecessary deaths. Far more beneficial would be a free source of vetted digital designs that anyone with access to equipment could fabricate for their local hospitals. Ideally, these designs would follow good open source design procedures. We are well aware of risks and shortcomings to this approach, and that those used to the standard model may not understand how fast technological development is in the open source community.

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More from opensource.com regarding COVID-19

  • Open source fights against COVID-19, Google's new security tool written in Python, and more open source news

    When COVID-19 started its march around the world, open source stepped up to try to help stop it. That includes using open data to create tracking dashboards and apps, designing ventilators, and developing protective gear.

    Scientists at the University of Waterloo in Canada have teamed with artificial intelligence firm DarwinAI to create an open source tool "to identify signs of Covid-19 in chest x-rays." Called COVID-Net, it's neural network "that is particularly good at recognizing images." The dataset the researchers are using is available on GitHub, which includes a link the software.

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