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Linux 5.6

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Linux

So I'll admit to vacillating between doing this 5.6 release and doing
another -rc.

This has a bit more changes than I'd like, but they are mostly from
davem's networking fixes pulls, and David feels comfy with them. And I
looked over the diff, and none of it looks scary. It's just slightly
more than I'd have preferred at this stage - not doesn't really seem
worth delaying a release over.

So about half the diff from the final week is network driver fixlets,
and some minor core networking fixes. Another 20% is tooling - mostly
bpf and netfilter selftests (but also some perf work).

The rest is "misc" - mostly random drivers (gpio, rdma, input) and DTS
files. With a smattering of fixes elsewhere (a couple of afs fixes,
some vm fixes, etc).

The shortlog is appended, nothing really looks all that exciting, and
most of the discussions I've seen are already about things for the
next merge window.

Which obviously opens now as of the release, and I'll start doing
pulls tomorrow. I already have a couple of pull requests in pending in
my inbox - thank you.

And while I haven't really seen any real sign of kernel development
being impacted by all the coronavirus activity - I suspect a lot of us
work from home even normally, and my daughter laughed at me and called
me a "social distancing champ" the other day - it may be worth just
mentioning: I think we're all reading the news and slightly
distracted.  I'm currently going by the assumption that we'll have a
fairly normal 5.7 release, and there doesn't seem to be any signs
saying otherwise, but hey, people may have better-than-usual reasons
for missing the merge window. Let me know if you know of some
subsystem that ends up being affected.

So we'll play it by ear and see what happens. It's not like the merge
window is more important than your health, or the health of people
around you.

                  Linus

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Linux 5.6 Kernel Released

  • Linux 5.6 Kernel Released With WireGuard, USB4, New AMD + Intel Hardware Support

    Linus Torvalds just announced the release of the Linux 5.6 stable kernel a few minutes ago. This also means the Linux 5.7 merge window is now open for business.

  • The 5.6 kernel has been released

    Linus has released the 5.6 kernel.

    Some of the headline features in this release include Arm EOPD support, time namespaces, the BPF dispatcher and batched BPF map operations (both described in this article), the openat2() system call, the WireGuard virtual private network implementation, the flow queue PIE packet scheduler, nearly complete year-2038 support, many new io_uring features, the pidfd_getfd() system call, the ZoneFS filesystem, the ability to implement TCP congestion-control algorithms in BPF, the dma-buf heaps subsystem, and the removal of the /dev/random blocking pool.

    See the LWN merge-window summaries (part 1 and part 2) and the (under construction) KernelNewbies 5.6 page for more details.

'Social distancing champ' Linus Torvalds releases Linux 5.6

  • 'Social distancing champ' Linus Torvalds releases Linux 5.6, tells devs to put health before next release

    Linux overseer Linus Torvalds given the world version 5.6 of the Linux kernel, and been given the title “social distancing champ”.

    The latter accolade came from his daughter. But he’s tried to live the values it implies by telling the Linux community not to stress about the pace of kernel development.

    “I haven't really seen any real sign of kernel development being impacted by all the coronavirus activity - I suspect a lot of us work from home even normally,” he wrote.

    “I'm currently going by the assumption that we'll have a fairly normal 5.7 release, and there doesn't seem to be any signs saying otherwise, but hey, people may have better-than-usual reasons for missing the merge window,” he added.

Linux Kernel 5.6 Officially Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.6 Officially Released

    Torvalds says in the official announcement that the development of the next kernel update is unlikely to be impacted substantially by the new coronavirus outbreak, as most engineers are typically working from home anyway.

    However, he does admit that a slowdown is expected due to social distancing and the pandemic.

Linux 5.6 Release – Main Changes, Arm, MIPS & RISC-V

  • Linux 5.6 Release – Main Changes, Arm, MIPS & RISC-V Architectures

    Some of those changes are said to allow booting a buildroot-based system on QEMU’s virt board.

    For the full list of commit messages, you can check out the changelog generated with the command git log v5.5..v5.6 --stat. KernelNewbies website should also soon have a Linux 5.6 changelog.

Linux Kernel 5.6 Released With Plenty Of New Features

  • Linux Kernel 5.6 Released With Plenty Of New Features

    The boss of the Linux, Linus Torvalds has released Linux Kernel 5.6. One of the biggest features or improvements that you might see in Linux Kernel 5.6 is that it has a solution for the Year 2038 Problem which means that you can now run your 32-bit system beyond Jan 19, 2038.

    The new kernel also has support for WireGuard VPN, Server-to-server copy for NFSD, Intel Virtual Bus, Qualcomm, Experimental F2FS file compression support, USB4, Amazon Echo speaker and open-source NVIDIA RTX 2000 series.

Linux Kernel 5.6 Officially Released with Built-In WireGuard

  • Linux Kernel 5.6 Officially Released with Built-In WireGuard Support

    Despite all of the coronavirus challenges we’re facing these days, Linus Torvalds announced the release of the Linux 5.6 kernel series, the first to ship with built-in WireGuard support.

    Development of Linux kernel 5.6 kicked off in early February with the first Release Candidate, but it wasn’t affected by the coronavirus outbreak. Seven weeks and RCs later, the final release of the Linux 5.6 kernel is here with a plethora of goodies.

    WireGuard is now built into the kernel and all future kernels will ship with it

    [...]

    Of course, there are also numerous new and updated kernels, along with lots of improvements for various components. This makes Linux kernel 5.6 a worthy upgrade for most GNU/Linux distributions.

    However, Linux 5.6 isn’t yet ready for mainstream use because it’s still marked as a “mainline” kernel on the kernel.org website, from where you can also download the source tarball if you’re eager to try it on your machine.

    The rest of the world should wait for the first point release, Linux kernel 5.6.1, before upgrading. With this, the two-weeks merge window for the Linux 5.7 kernel series is now officially open, and Linus Torvalds hopes the coronavirus outbreak won’t affect its development cycle.

Serious bug in the final

  • Linux 5.6 Ships With Broken Intel WiFi Driver After Network Security Fixes Go Awry

    For those that are normally spinning their own kernels and punctually upgrading to new releases, you will want to hold off on the new Linux 5.6 kernel for the moment if you use the Intel "IWLWIFI" WiFi driver.

    Landing in the kernel right ahead of the Linux 5.6 release were a set of mac80211 security fixes sent in by Intel's Johannes Berg. Those fixes in turn broke the IWLWIFI driver that supports Intel's current wireless chipsets on Linux.

Linux 5.6 is out with USB4 and GeForce RTX GPU support

  • Linux 5.6 is out with USB4 and GeForce RTX GPU support, plus much more

    A new Linux Kernel version 5.6 has been officially released with some important changes including the addition of support for USB4, and GeForce RTX 2000 series graphics cards with the Nouveau driver.

    Yes, Turing GPU support has arrived with the open source Nouveau driver, along with the proprietary firmware images, as Phoronix.com reports. However, don’t get too excited, as re-clocking doesn’t work yet (getting the GPU to operate at stock clocks), and other important pieces of the puzzle are missing (like no Vulkan support with Nouveau).

Linux 5.6 Kernel released with Nvidia RTX 20 graphics support

  • Linux 5.6 Kernel released with Nvidia RTX 20 graphics support

    The Linux 5.6 Kernel was released this weekend. The popular alternative OS kernel includes some important new features and changes, as well a broader support for modern PC hardware like Nvidia RTX20 and AMD Navi series GPUs. However, in his announcement of the release, Linus Torvalds indicated that progress towards the next release could be impacted by Covid-19.

    Linux specialist site Phoronix characterises the Linux 5.6-rc1 test release kernel as "simply huge," being stuffed with new and improved features for end-users. HEXUS readers might be particularly interested in the raft of new CPUs and GPUs supported in this release but there is a lot more to discuss, as you will see if you read on.

How to Install Kernel 5.6 in Ubuntu / Linux Mint

SD Times news digest

Bootlin contributions to Linux 5.6 enumerated

  • Linux 5.6, Bootlin contributions inside

    Linux 5.6 was released last Sunday. As usual, LWN has the best coverage of the new features merged in this release: part 1 and part 2. Sadly, the corresponding KernelNewbies page has not yet been updated with the usual very interesting summary of the important changes.

    Bootlin contributed a total of 95 patches to this release, which makes us the 27th contributing company by number of commits, according to the statistics.

Linux 5.6 Contributions From Collaborans

  • Linux Kernel 5.6

    The Linux kernel development process has always prided itself in being a distributed effort, with contributions coming in from all parts of the world. Long before video conferencing became the new normal, kernel developers were collaborating remotely, using tools like IRC and mailing lists to successfully work together. It comes to no surprise, then, that despite the challenges presented by COVID-19, kernel development has continued.

    Of course, the merge window for kernel 5.6 closed before most countries had implemented any COVID-19 countermeasures. Since then, most of us have been, and continue to be, affected by COVID-19 in one way or another. And while 5.7 already promises to be another great release, what matters most right now is that everyone in the community stays safe. Take care of yourselves and those around you!

    That being said, kernel 5.6 was released over the weekend, so let's take a look at the various projects Collaborans have been involved in, and the progress made. As usual, you can learn more about this release in thise LWN posts: part 1, part 2, and development statistics.

Linux kernel 5.6.0 iwlwifi bug

  • Linux kernel 5.6.0 iwlwifi bug

    Quick note that the Linux kernel 5.6.0 has an iwlwifi bug that will prevent network connectivity. [1]

    A patch is out but did not make 5.6.0. This patch IS included in gentoo-sources-5.6.0. It will be in vanilla-sources 5.6.1 once upstream releases a new version.

What's New in Linux 5.6? WireGuard VPN and USB4

  • What's New in Linux 5.6? WireGuard VPN and USB4

    Linus's post also notes that for the next release's timing they'll "play it by ear... It's not like the merge window is more important than your health, or the health of people around you." But he says he hasn't seen signs that the pandemic could affect its development (other than the possibility of distraction by the news).

    "I suspect a lot of us work from home even normally, and my daughter laughed at me and called me a 'social distancing champ' the other day..."

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  • Reiser5 File-System Working On New Features Like Data Tiering, Burst Buffers

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