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Devices: Seeed, Nexcom and Kontron

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Seeed IoT Button for AWS Brings Back Amazon Dash Button to Life for Developers

    Amazon introduced $5 dash buttons in 2015 to let consumers purchase regular items such as washing powder by simply pressing a button. Some people hacked them for other purposes, for instance as WiFi logging buttons, but the company eventually stopped selling the buttons in February 2019 and fully killed those at the end of August.

  • Rugged embedded PC supports Linux on Apollo Lake

    Nexcom’s rugged, Linux-ready “NISE 108” embedded computer has an Apollo Lake Celeron, triple display support with dual DP, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x COM, and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    Nexcom announced a 185 x 131 x 54mm industrial gateway that runs Linux 4.1 or Win 10 IoT Enterprise on a quad-core, 1.5GHz Celeron J3455 from Intel’s Apollo Lake generation. The fanless NISE 108 is larger and more feature rich than last year’s Apollo Lake based NISE 51, which uses a dual-core, Apollo Lake Celeron N3550.

  • 3.5-inch Whiskey Lake SBC features CNVi-ready M.2 slot for speedy Intel WiFi cards

    Kontron has launched a 3.5″-SBC-WLU SBC that runs Linux or Win 10 on an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake CPU with up to 64GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 4x USB, triple display support, and triple M.2 slots including a CNVi-ready slot.

    Kontron’s 3.5″-SBC-WLU joins at least four other Linux-ready 3.5-inch boards with Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE processors (see farther below). The SBC may be late to the Whiskey Lake party, but it brings a nice party gift: an M.2 E-key slot that supports Intel Integrated Connectivity (CNVi) WiFi/Bluetooth modules, including Intel Wireless-AC and Intel Wireless-Access Point cards.

More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 35.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 35.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages. Read more

Graphics: WayVNC, MoltenVK, Mir, Navi and Mali

  • wayvnc 0.3.1
    New features since v0.2.0:
    
     * Copy & paste, thanks to Scott Moreau.
     * wayvnc now has a man page.
     * wayvnc now exits if authentication is enabled but fails.
    
    Git commit history since v0.2.0:
    
    Alexander Graul (1):
          Add openSUSE Tumbleweed installation instruction
    
    Andri Yngvason (15):
          buffer: Fix buffer attribute comparison
          README: Use "yay" in archlinux installation instructions
          Exit if enabling auth fails
          Clean up config on exit
          Clean up aml on nvnc init failure
          data-control: Make offer handling asynchronous
          data-control: Don't free data-control-manager twice
          data-control: Clean up whole receive context in aml_free_fn
          data-control: Destroy data device on exit
          Don't init data_control if it's not supported by compositor
          Write a man page
          Generate and install a man page
          man-page: Fix wording
          FAQ: Remove outdated Q
          Release v3.0.0
          Fix man page path
    
    Jan Beich (1):
          shm: guard fallback on FreeBSD < 13 as well
    
    Jony (1):
          add Void Linux install command to README.md
    
    Scott Moreau (1):
          Add basic clipboard support
    
  • WayVNC 0.3 Released - The Wayland VNC Server Now Supports Copy & Paste

    WayVNC 0.3 released today as the Wayland VNC server built atop the WLROOTS library. The headline feature of WayVNC is... clipboard support! Yep, this popular Wayland VNC server can finally support copy and paste functionality. This clipboard support landed just last week and allows copy/paste of text to/from the host clipboard. On the Wayland side this clipboard support is making use of the wlr-data-control-unstable-v1 protocol. This WayVNC clipboard support was written by longtime Wayland contributor Scott Moreau.

  • MoltenVK 1.1 Update Brings Big Improvements For Vulkan On macOS

    MoltenVK 1.1 is out as a big update for this graphics translation layer for getting the Vulkan API running on macOS and iOS devices by translating calls to Apple's Metal API. MoltenVK 1.1 is out with Vulkan 1.1 support by exposing all core Vulkan 1.1 extensions and other relevant changes. There are also a number of other new Vulkan extensions supported by this release like KHR_multiview, KHR_external_semaphore, KHR_external_fence, and others.

  • Mir 2.1 Released With Some New Protocol Support, Many Fixes

    Mir 2.1 has been released as Canonical's project around offering a set of libraries for constructing Wayland shells particularly with Snap confinement support and other Ubuntu-focused features. With the Mir 2.1 release comes a --show-splash command line option, reduced locking within the KeyRepeatDispatcher code, support for the zwp_linux_dmabuf_unstable_v1 protocol within the GBM-KMS back-end, and support for the Wayland zwlr_layer_shell_v1 v3 and wlr_foreign_toplevel_management_unstable_v1 protocols. There are also X11 handling improvements too.

  • Linux 5.9 Gets More Fixes For AMD RDNA2 GPUs, Promotes Navi 12

    A batch of fixes to the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver were sent in today for Linux 5.9. While AMDGPU fixes this late in the kernel cycle tend to not be too notable, this time around there are some prominent items worth covering. When it comes to the next-generation "Sienna Cichlid" and "Navy Flounder" Navi 2x graphics (RDNA2) support, there are continued updates in making the support in good shape for Linux 5.9 stable. This work includes additional Sienna Cichlid PCI IDs being added, fixing for building DCN 3.0 code with older versions of GCC, temporarily disabling GFXOFF capabilities for Navy Flounder until issues are resolved, and the kernel side bits for AV1 decode with these GPUs.

  • Mali G72 Now Supported By Open-Source Panfrost Gallium3D Driver

    The open-source Panfrost graphics driver, which is now backed/supported by Arm after starting as a reverse-engineering effort, has picked up support for the Mali G72 GPU. Adding to the many Panfrost open-source driver accomplishments this year is now support for the G72 as their latest support addition. The Mali G72 has been around since late 2017 and is making use of the second-generation Bifrost architecture. The Mali G72 is used by the likes of the Kirin 970, Samsung Exynos 9 9810, Exynos 7 9610, and Helio P60/P70 SoCs.

Intel: DG1, Media Driver 2020.3 and Key Locker Support

  • Intel Sends Out Latest DG1 Linux Patches But Won't Hit Until At Least The 5.11 Kernel

    The sixth spin of Intel DG1 discrete graphics card patches have now been sent out for review, amounting to just about 700 lines of new driver code due to building off the existing DG1 work and more broadly the Gen12/Xe support that's been refined in mainline for months. With these patches it would appear the Intel DG1 is then in good shape under Linux but due to the timing is unlikely to be mainlined until a stable kernel release in early 2021. Intel's Gen12 / Xe Graphics as found in Tiger Lake appears to be in good shape with the latest mainline code (soon to be tested at Phoronix) but for the DG1 discrete graphics card there have been patches lingering.

  • Intel Media Driver 2020.3 Released With Gen12 AV1 Decode, Other Improvements

    Just in time for the end of the quarter Intel's open-source multimedia team has released the Media Driver 2020.3 package for the Intel graphics accelerated media encode/decode component on Linux platforms. The Intel Media Decode Driver 2020.3 is notable in that it rounds out the Gen12/Xe support. This support is not only for the Tiger Lake support now beginning to appear in shipping notebooks but also for DG1 and upcoming Rocket Lake and SG1 solutions as well.

  • Intel Key Locker Support Added To LLVM - Confirms Presence With Tiger Lake

    Last week on the GNU toolchain side was initial work on supporting Intel Key Locker while this week Key Locker support has come to LLVM. Intel Key Locker is a means of encrypting/decrypting data with an AES key without having access to the raw key. Key Locker relies on converting AES keys into handles that are then used in place of the actual key, until revoked by the system. The goal with this feature is for preventing any rogue attackers from obtaining the actual AES keys on the system.

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