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Games: Stadia, Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus and More

  • Google announce multiple new games coming to Stadia with Gunsport a 'First on Stadia' title

    As Google move ever closer to finally opening up Stadia to everyone, they continue building up their collection of streaming games with three titles out for April's Pro subs and two new titles announced for release. Time for another Stadia round-up.

    For a reminder: right now you can get the Serious Sam Collection, Stacks On Stacks (On Stacks) and Spitlings free as part of Stadia Pro if you kept up your subscription. Thumper is also staying for another month, after it previously due to leave Stadia Pro on March 31 and Metro Exodus has now left Stadia Pro so anyone else would need to buy it.

  • Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus due out in May with online PvP arena battles

    Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus is adding in a new twist on the harsh turn-based combat of Darkest Dungeon with arena PvP battles where you don't risk your standard campaign crew.

    Giving players an entirely new way to play the game, you will be entering a new Hamlet location: The Butcher's Circus where The Butcher demands a show. It sounds quite interesting, certainly nothing like the current Darkest Dungeon where the exploration forms a huge part of the usual gameplay. Doing away with all of that to focus purely on facing other players online, and climbing up the ranks certainly sounds interesting. With the supreme style it has, this could be great.

  • Another new NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver expands Ray Tracing support on Linux

    The second update in the space of a week, NVIDIA just today put out another NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver which further expands the Ray Tracing capabilities on Linux.

  • Mixing a sci-fi RPG with a Visual Novel 'Planet Stronghold 2' is out now

    Planet Stronghold 2 from Winter Wolves is a brand new science-fiction RPG that blends in isometric map exploration and Visual Novel elements. Serving as a sequel to their 2011 game, Planet Stronghold 2 turns things up a notch as their biggest game yet with it being their biggest game yet.

    With a branching plot featuring some tough and mutually exclusive choices, the ability to play as Male or Female with full skills customization and even a little romance thrown in too. What's also interesting is that you can play it in different ways: either as a full RPG with the map exploration or tune it to the Visual Novel mode if you just want story content.

  • Terraria has now sold over 30 million copies as they get closer to the massive Journey's End update

    Terraria from developer Re-Logic has now officially passed 30 million sales and shows no sign of stopping, as they approach a huge update with Journey's End.

    What's interesting is that they had announced in May last year, that they hit 27 million. So in the space of only around a year, they've added an additional 3 million. Considering how old Terraria is now (2011), it's incredibly impressive that they're just continuing to grow. They broke it down a little to mention that 14 million is from PC, 7.6 million on consoles and 8.7 million was from mobile.

  • inXile Entertainment announce Wasteland 3 is delayed until August 28

    Wasteland 3 was originally set for May 19 and now that some platforms have access to a Beta, inXile Entertainment have said they're now going for an August 28 launch.

    The main reason being of course the current Coronavirus situation, they said in an announcement on their official site that they're working from home like a lot of other companies which has impacted their work. However, they make it clear they're in a good position with Microsoft and Deep Silver supporting them well and they wish to ensure "a stellar product on day one".

X-Plane Update

  • X-Plane 11.50 Public Beta 1: Vulkan and Metal Are Here

    Today is the day. X-Plane 11.50 public beta 1 is now available for download to everyone. (Steam users: the beta is staged on the servers, and we’ll let it loose this afternoon if it isn’t setting people’s machines on fire.)
    I want to extend my appreciation to the 50+ third party developers who participated in the eleven (!) private developer previews. This is probably the most complex single patch we have developed with regards to third party add-ons; their help testing and trouble-shooting issues was invaluable.

  • X-Plane 11.50 Flight Simulator Beta Released With Vulkan API Support

    For years we have been looking forward to X-Plane with a new Vulkan renderer to replace its aging OpenGL renderer. Finally today the X-Plane 11.50 Beta has been made public for this realistic flight simulator that supports Metal on Apple platforms and Vulkan everywhere else.

Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games

  • Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games Yielding Sizable Performance Jumps

    Well known open-source AMD OpenGL driver developer Marek Olšák has enabled more Linux games to run with Mesa's GLTHREAD functionality enabled for helping with the performance.

    This OpenGL threading functionality is now enabled by default for more games. This OpenGL threading is only enabled on a per-application basis or when setting mesa_glthread=true but can really help with the performance especially on older hardware.

Google has opened up their Stadia game streaming service

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Avita Essential: Perfect Laptop for School and College Students at Rs. 17,990

    Starting with the basics, this is a thin and light notebook. The processor inside powering Avita Essential is the Intel Celeron N4000 which is not a powerful processor for windows but perfect for Ubuntu or ChromeOS. There is 4GB of LPDDR4 inside which again is not good enough for Windows but perfect for Ubuntu and ChromeOS. For storage Avita Essential has 128GB SSD. Fast storage means faster boot time but again we would highly recommend using Ubuntu or ChromeOS on this machine.

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  • Buttered-Up Fedora | LINUX Unplugged 377

    Fedora 33 is a bold release, and we’ve put it through the wringer. We tell you what’s great, and what you should know before diving in. Plus our thoughts on the bigger problem exposed by the youtube-dl takedown.

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  • mintCast 346.5 – The Midori Story – mintCast

    In our Innards section, we talk lesser known browsers And finally, the feedback and a couple of suggestions

  • AMDGPU Linux Driver To Finally Enable BACO For Hawaii - Allowing S4/Hibernation - Phoronix

    The Radeon R9 290 "Hawaii" series are about seven years old almost to the day and the AMD Linux open-source driver crew is seemingly celebrating by finally adding the few lines of code needed to enable BACO power management. [...] The patch posted on Tuesday amounts to just a few lines of code for wiring up Hawaii to the AMDGPU driver's BACO support. It's just a few lines of code now but it's only been more recently that AMDGPU began squaring away its BACO support. Thus back in the early days of Hawaii it wasn't as trivial to provide this support albeit for end-users still a pity it took so long for allowing these GPUs to support S4/hibernation.

  • Noah Meyerhans | Debian STS: Short Term Support

    In another of my frequent late-night bouts with insomnia, I started thinking about the intersection of a number of different issues facing Debian today, both from a user point of view and a developer point of view. Debian has a reputation for shipping “stale” software. Versions in the stable branch are often significantly behind the latest development upstream. Debian’s policy here has been that this is fine, our goal is to ship something stable, not something bleeding edge. Unofficially, our response to users is: If you need bleeding edge software, Debian may not be for you. Officially, we have no response to users who want fresher software. Debian also has a problem with a lack of manpower. I believe that part of why we have a hard time attracting contributors is our reputation for stale software. It might be worth it for us to consider changes to our approach to releases.

  • Getting Real About the License Complexity of Linux [Ed: Proprietary software licensing is not complex? Ask BSA.]

    Talk about complex and tedious, but necessary. Identifying all copyright holders, licenses and license obligations within Linux is just that. Added to the already complex maze that is Linux is the fact that the accuracy of licensing information is tied to the specific version of the Linux Kernel you’re using, and older versions will have more issues than newer. Files may contain erroneous license data and subsequently make its way into your software inventory and Bill of Materials.

  • Impact of OSS and OSH – a stakeholder survey

    With this survey, the study coordinators are interested in complementing the literature, database and case study driven approach to assess impact of OSS and OSH with input from the respondents of the stakeholder survey. All together, this body of evidence will be used to derive policy recommendations.

  • How Hall County is handling influx of absentee voting, effects of ransomware attack on elections office

    One of the databases the county uses to verify voter signatures on absentee ballots is not working after some county network outages due to a ransomware attack on Oct. 7. Registration Coordinator Kay Wimpye with the county elections office said employees can still verify voter signatures by manually pulling hard copies of voter registration cards, which is more time-consuming. Most voter signatures can be verified using a state database that has been unaffected by the outages, she said.

  • Vastaamo board fires CEO, says he kept data breach secret for year and a half

    On Monday the board said that an internal probe had determined that a second breach had occurred in March 2019. It appears that at that point Tapio was aware of the breaches and of shortcomings in the psychotherapy provider’s data security systems.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Secure your Kubernetes secrets with smart cards and libssh

    In computer security, software implementations of cryptographic algorithms are vulnerable to side-channel attacks. This type of attack seeks to glean information from the computer system rather than from the program that it is running. As examples, Spectre and Meltdown are both side-channel attacks that target the microarchitecture of modern processors. Microarchitecture attacks are only a subset of all side-channel attacks. There are many others. An attacker who is able to access unauthorized regions in memory can discover private or sensitive information, including authentication secrets. A question that naturally follows is, “Where can I safely store my secrets?” One way to protect your Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift secrets is to store them in a hardware token. A hardware token physically separates your secret key from the host machine and the applications that it is running. You can use secret keys stored on smart cards or cryptographic tokens to authenticate to server-side applications. This article introduces Public Key Cryptography Standard #11 (PKCS #11), which you can use to uniquely identify objects stored in tokens. I show you how to build and use libssh with support for PKCS #11 and how to use curl to store and retrieve tokens through the secure shell (SSH) protocol.

  • IBM Advance Toolchain for Linux on Power 14.0-1 released!

    A new update release for the 14.0 series of the IBM® Advance Toolchain for Linux on Power is now available.

  • China Mobile Communications Corporation Internet, China National Offshore Oil Corporation and GREE Group Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for China

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for China. China Mobile Communications Corporation Internet, China National Offshore Oil Corporation and GREE Group were honored at the Red Hat Forum China 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

Programming Leftovers

  • PyTorch 1.7.0 Now Available - Exxact

    PyTorch is a widely used, open source deep learning platform used for easily writing neural network layers in Python enabling a seamless workflow from research to production. Based on Torch, PyTorch has become a powerful machine learning framework favored by esteemed researchers around the world. The newest stable release of PyTorch, version 1.7.0, has a number of new highlights including  CUDA 11, New APIs for FFTs, Windows support for Distributed training and more.

  • Stefan Scherfke: Raise … from … in Python
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #444 (Oct. 27, 2020)
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  • Program in Arm6 assembly language on a Raspberry Pi | Opensource.com

    Assembly language offers special insights into how machines work and how they can be programmed.

  • How JavaScript became a serious programming language

    JavaScript's humble start began in 1995, when it was created in just 10 days by Brendan Eich, then an employee with Netscape Communications Corporation. JavaScript has come a long way since then, from a tool to make websites pretty to a serious programming language. In its early days, JavaScript was considered a visual tool that made websites a little more fun and attractive. Languages like Jakarta Server Pages (JSP; formerly JavaServer Pages) used to do all the heavy lifting on rendered web pages, and JavaScript was used to create basic interactions, visual enhancements, and animations. For a long time, the demarcations between HTML, CSS, and JavaScript were not clear. Frontend development primarily consists of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, forming a "layer cake" of standard web technologies.

Making Linux More Like Windows

  • Collabora's Work On Extending The Linux Kernel To Better Support Windows Gaming - Phoronix

    Windows gaming on Linux got some love this week at the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit Europe virtual event. In particular, a recap of the work that's been done so far on extending the Linux kernel to better support Wine / Steam Play based support for Windows games running on Linux.  Gabriel Krisman Bertazi as an engineer for consulting firm Collabora talked about their work in recent years on improving the Linux kernel for supporting Valve's needs around running Windows games on Linux with Steam Play. Collabora has been one of Valve's partners for this effort along with CodeWeavers and Valve employing various developers on improving the Linux graphics stack, etc. 

  • Collabora expect their Linux Kernel work for Windows game emulation in Kernel 5.11

    Collabora have been doing presentations during the Open Source Summit, with one particular talk from Gabriel Krisman Bertazi on the "State of Linux Gaming" being quite interesting. While there has been a lot of progress with the Windows compatibility layers Wine and Valve's fork Proton (part of Steam Play), there's still plenty of areas currently lacking and needing work. Collabora is one company extending the Linux Kernel to improve Linux gaming with these compatibility layers, thanks to Valve sponsoring the work. One of the big missing pieces of the pie is supporting the likes of anti-cheat and DRM, with anti-cheat especially causing all sorts of problems entirely breaking lots of Windows games in Wine and Proton. The State of Linux Gaming talk was mostly going over what anyone following would already know, as the event isn't aimed at your typical Linux gaming enthusiast. However, it was still an interesting talk to follow. Thanks to The Linux Foundation, I was able to attend and listen to the talk (the online event requires a ticket purchase) but I've been told by my Collabora contact that they will all eventually be up on their own YouTube Channel which could be as soon as early next week for anyone to be able to view. If you want a brief overview, you can find the slides here from the event schedule. One of the key points that Gabriel Krisman Bertazi went over is their work on system call emulation, which is now required because DRM and anti-cheat tech "are issuing system calls directly from the Windows game code and that bypasses Wine because Wine is not a sandbox" and Wine currently cannot capture those system calls needed which ends up causing games to crash.