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Games: Stadia, Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus and More

  • Google announce multiple new games coming to Stadia with Gunsport a 'First on Stadia' title

    As Google move ever closer to finally opening up Stadia to everyone, they continue building up their collection of streaming games with three titles out for April's Pro subs and two new titles announced for release. Time for another Stadia round-up.

    For a reminder: right now you can get the Serious Sam Collection, Stacks On Stacks (On Stacks) and Spitlings free as part of Stadia Pro if you kept up your subscription. Thumper is also staying for another month, after it previously due to leave Stadia Pro on March 31 and Metro Exodus has now left Stadia Pro so anyone else would need to buy it.

  • Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus due out in May with online PvP arena battles

    Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus is adding in a new twist on the harsh turn-based combat of Darkest Dungeon with arena PvP battles where you don't risk your standard campaign crew.

    Giving players an entirely new way to play the game, you will be entering a new Hamlet location: The Butcher's Circus where The Butcher demands a show. It sounds quite interesting, certainly nothing like the current Darkest Dungeon where the exploration forms a huge part of the usual gameplay. Doing away with all of that to focus purely on facing other players online, and climbing up the ranks certainly sounds interesting. With the supreme style it has, this could be great.

  • Another new NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver expands Ray Tracing support on Linux

    The second update in the space of a week, NVIDIA just today put out another NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver which further expands the Ray Tracing capabilities on Linux.

  • Mixing a sci-fi RPG with a Visual Novel 'Planet Stronghold 2' is out now

    Planet Stronghold 2 from Winter Wolves is a brand new science-fiction RPG that blends in isometric map exploration and Visual Novel elements. Serving as a sequel to their 2011 game, Planet Stronghold 2 turns things up a notch as their biggest game yet with it being their biggest game yet.

    With a branching plot featuring some tough and mutually exclusive choices, the ability to play as Male or Female with full skills customization and even a little romance thrown in too. What's also interesting is that you can play it in different ways: either as a full RPG with the map exploration or tune it to the Visual Novel mode if you just want story content.

  • Terraria has now sold over 30 million copies as they get closer to the massive Journey's End update

    Terraria from developer Re-Logic has now officially passed 30 million sales and shows no sign of stopping, as they approach a huge update with Journey's End.

    What's interesting is that they had announced in May last year, that they hit 27 million. So in the space of only around a year, they've added an additional 3 million. Considering how old Terraria is now (2011), it's incredibly impressive that they're just continuing to grow. They broke it down a little to mention that 14 million is from PC, 7.6 million on consoles and 8.7 million was from mobile.

  • inXile Entertainment announce Wasteland 3 is delayed until August 28

    Wasteland 3 was originally set for May 19 and now that some platforms have access to a Beta, inXile Entertainment have said they're now going for an August 28 launch.

    The main reason being of course the current Coronavirus situation, they said in an announcement on their official site that they're working from home like a lot of other companies which has impacted their work. However, they make it clear they're in a good position with Microsoft and Deep Silver supporting them well and they wish to ensure "a stellar product on day one".

X-Plane Update

  • X-Plane 11.50 Public Beta 1: Vulkan and Metal Are Here

    Today is the day. X-Plane 11.50 public beta 1 is now available for download to everyone. (Steam users: the beta is staged on the servers, and we’ll let it loose this afternoon if it isn’t setting people’s machines on fire.)
    I want to extend my appreciation to the 50+ third party developers who participated in the eleven (!) private developer previews. This is probably the most complex single patch we have developed with regards to third party add-ons; their help testing and trouble-shooting issues was invaluable.

  • X-Plane 11.50 Flight Simulator Beta Released With Vulkan API Support

    For years we have been looking forward to X-Plane with a new Vulkan renderer to replace its aging OpenGL renderer. Finally today the X-Plane 11.50 Beta has been made public for this realistic flight simulator that supports Metal on Apple platforms and Vulkan everywhere else.

Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games

  • Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games Yielding Sizable Performance Jumps

    Well known open-source AMD OpenGL driver developer Marek Olšák has enabled more Linux games to run with Mesa's GLTHREAD functionality enabled for helping with the performance.

    This OpenGL threading functionality is now enabled by default for more games. This OpenGL threading is only enabled on a per-application basis or when setting mesa_glthread=true but can really help with the performance especially on older hardware.

Google has opened up their Stadia game streaming service

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More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Chrome, Mozilla and Firefox Leftovers

  • Chrome 84 Beta: Web OTP, Web Animations, New Origin Trials and More

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 84 is beta as of May 28, 2020.

  • Chrome 84 Beta Brings Better Web Animations API, Experimental WebAssembly SIMD

    Following the recent Chrome 83 release, Chrome 84 has now been promoted to beta. The Chrome 84 Beta is bringing Web OTP API (SMS Receiver API) support on Android, significant improvements to its Web Animations API implementation, WebAssembly SIMD support with a 128-bit value type is now available via the Origin trials (experimental functionality) along with a Cookie Store API, Idle Detection API, and other trial features.

  • Should you buy a Chromebook?

    With more and more people buying laptops to work or learn from home, a lot of folks are probably looking into the prospect of switching to a lighter, cheaper Chromebook instead of a traditional Windows or Mac laptop. Chromebooks come at a wide range of price points and with a variety of features, but the big question for most people is about Chrome OS itself. How hard is it to switch? What are Android apps like? Does Linux support really work, and how well? Do Chromebooks make good tablets? Can I use Firefox on one? We'll cover as much of that as we can in this post.

  • Firefox features for remote school (that can also be used for just about anything)

    Helping kids with school work can be challenging in the best of times (“new” math anyone?) let alone during a worldwide pandemic. These Firefox features can help make managing school work, and remote summer classes if those are on your horizon, a little easier.

  • The influence of hardware on Firefox build times

    I recently upgraded my aging “fast” build machine. Back when I assembled the machine, it could do a full clobber build of Firefox in about 10 minutes. That was slightly more than 10 years ago. This upgrade, and the build times I’m getting on the brand new machine (now 6 months old) and other machines led me to look at how some parameters influence build times. [...] The XPS13 being old, it is subject to thermal throttling, making it slower than it should be, but it wouldn’t beat the 10 years old desktop anyway. Macbook Pros tend to get into these thermal issues after a while too. I’ve relied on laptops for a long time. My previous laptop before this XPS was another XPS, that is now about 6 to 7 years old, and while the newer one had more RAM, it was barely getting better build times compared to the older one when I switched. The evolution of laptop performance has been underwelming for a long time, but things finally changed last year. At long last. I wish I had numbers with a more recent laptop under the same OS as the XPS for fairer comparison. Or with the more recent larger laptops that sport even more cores, especially the fancy ones with Ryzen processors.

  • Writing inside organizations

    My team keeps snippets, which kinda-sorta feels like a blog-like interface for sharing context. We keep our snippets in a google doc largely because it has a low barrier to entry and it's a fast solution. However, I find that keeping snippets in a doc really limits the value I personally get from keeping a weekly log. Ostensibly, the value to writing snippets is keeping my team up to date on my work. However, I find that the secondary personal benefits are the ones that keep me motivated to write updates.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: May 2020 Edition

    IMPORTANT: Firefox 78 is the next ESR (Extended Support Release) version. That’s a more stable version designed for enterprises, but also used in some Linux distributions, and it remains supported for about a year. Once Firefox 78 moves to release, that content will remain frozen until that version becomes unsupported (about 15 months), so it’s important to ship the best localization possible.

  • Mozilla’s journey to environmental sustainability

    The programme may be new, but the process has been shaping for years: In March 2020, Mozilla officially launched a dedicated Environmental Sustainability Programme, and I am proud and excited to be stewarding our efforts. Since we launched, the world has been held captive by the COVID-19 pandemic. People occasionally ask me, “Is this really the time to build up and invest in such a large-scale, ambitious programme?” My answer is clear: Absolutely.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: An opportunity for openness and user agency in the proposed Facebook-Giphy merger

    Facebook is squarely in the crosshairs of global competition regulators, but despite that scrutiny, is moving to acquire Giphy, a popular platform that lets users share images on social platforms, such as Facebook, or messaging applications, such as WhatsApp. This merger – how it is reviewed, whether it is approved, and if approved under what sort of conditions – will set a precedent that will influence not only future mergers, but also the shape of legislative reforms being actively developed all around the world. It is crucial that antitrust agencies incorporate into their processes a deep understanding of the nature of the open internet and how it promotes competition, how data flows between integrated services, and in particular the role played by interoperability. Currently Giphy is integrated with numerous independent social messaging services, including, for example, Slack, Signal, and Twitter. A combined Facebook-Giphy would be in a position to restrict access by those companies, whether to preserve their exclusivity or to get leverage for some other reason. This would bring clear harm to users who would suddenly lose the capabilities they currently enjoy, and make it harder for other companies to compete.

Security and FUD

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (dovecot, dpdk, knot-resolver, and unbound), Mageia (ant, libexif, and php), SUSE (libmspack), and Ubuntu (php5, php7.0, php7.2, php7.3, php7.4 and unbound).

  • 5 Kernel Live Patching Tools That Will Help To Run Linux Servers Without Reboots

    Within IT organizations, there are processes and practices so routine that they are invisible. It doesn’t matter if such processes and practices are flawed, or if there exists a better way: if something has worked for a few years, people stop looking for alternatives. This perfectly describes current approaches to kernel patching. Right now, most organizations patch the servers by planning reboot cycles. Because rebooting the server fleet is a headache that causes downtime, people put it off for as long as they can. Which means patches aren’t applied as early as possible. This gap between patch issue and its application means risk, malpractice and may cause non-compliance. This standard approach to kernel patching exposes servers to malicious intent by threat actors on multiple attack vectors, putting IT organizations at risk of major security issues. Anyone tasked with keeping their organization safe from cyber attacks should be seeking a better way to run Linux servers without reboots (ideally, for years). In this article you will learn what is live patching, how it ensures the uptime, what 5 tools are available to help you run servers for years – without reboots and what are the advantages and drawbacks of each tool.

  • USB systems may have some serious security flaws - especially on Linux [Ed: ZDNet's FUD is going places; the tests were mostly done on Linux, so it's hardly shocking that the bugs found were in Linux. But it's presented as Linux being particularly bad.]

    Academics have developed a new tool that allowed them to discover 26 previously unidentified vulnerabilities in the USB driver stack used by many popular operating systems including Linux, macOS, Windows and FreeBSD.

  • New fuzzing tool picks up insecure USB driver code

    Matthias Payer at the federal polytechnic school in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Hui Peng at Purdue University, United States, said [pdf] that they leveraged open-source components such as QEMU processor emulator to design a tool that's low-cost and hardware independent, called USBFuzz.

  • New fuzzing tool for USB drivers uncovers bugs in Linux, macOS, Windows

    With a new fuzzing tool created specifically for testing the security of USB drivers, researchers have discovered more than two dozen vulnerabilities in a variety of operating systems. “USBFuzz discovered a total of 26 new bugs, including 16 memory bugs of high security impact in various Linux subsystems (USB core, USB sound, and network), one bug in FreeBSD, three in macOS (two resulting in an unplanned reboot and one freezing the system), and four in Windows 8 and Windows 10 (resulting in Blue Screens of Death), and one bug in the Linux USB host controller driver and another one in a USB camera driver,” Hui Peng and Mathias Payer explained.

  • NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program

    The U.S. National Security Agency says the same Russian military hacking group that interfered in the 2016 presidential election and unleashed a devastating malware attack the following year has been exploiting a major email server program since last August or earlier. The timing of the agency's advisory Thursday was unusual considering that the critical vulnerability in the Exim Mail Transfer Agent — which mostly runs on Unix-type operating systems — was identified 11 months ago, when a patch was issued. Exim is so widely used — though far less known than such commercial alternatives as Microsoft's proprietary Exchange — that some companies and government agencies that run it may still not have patched the vulnerability, said Jake Williams, president of Rendition Infosec and a former U.S. government hacker.

KDE: Akademy 2020 and GSoC 2020

  • Send your talks for Akademy 2020 *now*

    The Call for Participation is still open for two weeks more, but please make us a favour and send yours *now*. This way we don't have to panic thinking if we are going to need to go chasing people or not, or if we're going to have too few or too many proposals. Also if you ask the talks committee for review, we can review your talk early, give you feedback and improve it, so it's a win-win.

  • Status report: Community Bonding

    I’m checking in today to let you know what I did in my GSoC project these past weeks. This Community Bonding period was really wonderful; although I’ve been more or less involved with the project since 2016, I’ve acquainted myself with the efforts of each of the members, and so far it’s been a wonderful experience. During these past weeks, I’ve been preparing for the coding period by talking with Boudewijn and Wolthera about the particulars of Krita’s file format and build system. The objectives for the past two meetings were:

  • GSoC'20 with KDE

    About the Project The project involves improving KDE Web Infrastructure. KDE has a lot of websites and some of them like the main website could use an update. The first part of the project involves porting kde.org to use Hugo- A go based static site generator. kde.org is very old and thus contains a lot of pages. This project would involve porting most of the pages to markdown so as to make the website faster and easier to develop. The second part of the project involves updating Season of KDE website. The goal is to use more modern tooling and add some new features. This project is a part of the transition of KDE websites from LDAP to OAuth based authentication. OAuth is a much more modern approach to authentication and would solve some headaches with the current authentication system.