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Games: Stadia, Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus and More

  • Google announce multiple new games coming to Stadia with Gunsport a 'First on Stadia' title

    As Google move ever closer to finally opening up Stadia to everyone, they continue building up their collection of streaming games with three titles out for April's Pro subs and two new titles announced for release. Time for another Stadia round-up.

    For a reminder: right now you can get the Serious Sam Collection, Stacks On Stacks (On Stacks) and Spitlings free as part of Stadia Pro if you kept up your subscription. Thumper is also staying for another month, after it previously due to leave Stadia Pro on March 31 and Metro Exodus has now left Stadia Pro so anyone else would need to buy it.

  • Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus due out in May with online PvP arena battles

    Darkest Dungeon: The Butcher's Circus is adding in a new twist on the harsh turn-based combat of Darkest Dungeon with arena PvP battles where you don't risk your standard campaign crew.

    Giving players an entirely new way to play the game, you will be entering a new Hamlet location: The Butcher's Circus where The Butcher demands a show. It sounds quite interesting, certainly nothing like the current Darkest Dungeon where the exploration forms a huge part of the usual gameplay. Doing away with all of that to focus purely on facing other players online, and climbing up the ranks certainly sounds interesting. With the supreme style it has, this could be great.

  • Another new NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver expands Ray Tracing support on Linux

    The second update in the space of a week, NVIDIA just today put out another NVIDIA Vulkan Beta driver which further expands the Ray Tracing capabilities on Linux.

  • Mixing a sci-fi RPG with a Visual Novel 'Planet Stronghold 2' is out now

    Planet Stronghold 2 from Winter Wolves is a brand new science-fiction RPG that blends in isometric map exploration and Visual Novel elements. Serving as a sequel to their 2011 game, Planet Stronghold 2 turns things up a notch as their biggest game yet with it being their biggest game yet.

    With a branching plot featuring some tough and mutually exclusive choices, the ability to play as Male or Female with full skills customization and even a little romance thrown in too. What's also interesting is that you can play it in different ways: either as a full RPG with the map exploration or tune it to the Visual Novel mode if you just want story content.

  • Terraria has now sold over 30 million copies as they get closer to the massive Journey's End update

    Terraria from developer Re-Logic has now officially passed 30 million sales and shows no sign of stopping, as they approach a huge update with Journey's End.

    What's interesting is that they had announced in May last year, that they hit 27 million. So in the space of only around a year, they've added an additional 3 million. Considering how old Terraria is now (2011), it's incredibly impressive that they're just continuing to grow. They broke it down a little to mention that 14 million is from PC, 7.6 million on consoles and 8.7 million was from mobile.

  • inXile Entertainment announce Wasteland 3 is delayed until August 28

    Wasteland 3 was originally set for May 19 and now that some platforms have access to a Beta, inXile Entertainment have said they're now going for an August 28 launch.

    The main reason being of course the current Coronavirus situation, they said in an announcement on their official site that they're working from home like a lot of other companies which has impacted their work. However, they make it clear they're in a good position with Microsoft and Deep Silver supporting them well and they wish to ensure "a stellar product on day one".

X-Plane Update

  • X-Plane 11.50 Public Beta 1: Vulkan and Metal Are Here

    Today is the day. X-Plane 11.50 public beta 1 is now available for download to everyone. (Steam users: the beta is staged on the servers, and we’ll let it loose this afternoon if it isn’t setting people’s machines on fire.)
    I want to extend my appreciation to the 50+ third party developers who participated in the eleven (!) private developer previews. This is probably the most complex single patch we have developed with regards to third party add-ons; their help testing and trouble-shooting issues was invaluable.

  • X-Plane 11.50 Flight Simulator Beta Released With Vulkan API Support

    For years we have been looking forward to X-Plane with a new Vulkan renderer to replace its aging OpenGL renderer. Finally today the X-Plane 11.50 Beta has been made public for this realistic flight simulator that supports Metal on Apple platforms and Vulkan everywhere else.

Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games

  • Mesa OpenGL Threading Enabled For More Games Yielding Sizable Performance Jumps

    Well known open-source AMD OpenGL driver developer Marek Olšák has enabled more Linux games to run with Mesa's GLTHREAD functionality enabled for helping with the performance.

    This OpenGL threading functionality is now enabled by default for more games. This OpenGL threading is only enabled on a per-application basis or when setting mesa_glthread=true but can really help with the performance especially on older hardware.

Google has opened up their Stadia game streaming service

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More in Tux Machines

NanoPi NEO3 Headless SBC Launched for $20 and up

Last month, we found out FriendlyELEC was working on NanoPi NEO3, a tiny SBC powered by Rockchip RK3328 processor and made for headless applications and networked storage thanks to Gigabit Ethernet and USB 3.0 ports, as well as a 26-pin GPIO header. At the time, the board was still been finalized, but the company has now started to take orders for $20 and up depending on options which include a cute white enclosure... [...] The Wiki has been updated as well, and the company provides both Ubuntu Core 18.04 based FriendlyCore, and OpenWrt based FriendlyWrt operating systems for the board with both relying on Linux 5.4.12 kernel. I’d also expect Armbian to eventually provide Ubuntu 20.04 and Debian 10 images. Read more

Moving (parts of) the Cling REPL in Clang

Motivation
===

Over the last decade we have developed an interactive, interpretative 
C++ (aka REPL) as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) data analysis 
project -- ROOT [1-2]. We invested a significant  effort to replace the 
CINT C++ interpreter with a newly implemented REPL based on llvm -- 
cling [3]. The cling infrastructure is a core component of the data 
analysis framework of ROOT and runs in production for approximately 5 
years.

Cling is also  a standalone tool, which has a growing community outside 
of our field. Cling’s user community includes users in finance, biology 
and in a few companies with proprietary software. For example, there is 
a xeus-cling jupyter kernel [4]. One of the major challenges we face to 
foster that community is  our cling-related patches in llvm and clang 
forks. The benefits of using the LLVM community standards for code 
reviews, release cycles and integration has been mentioned a number of 
times by our "external" users.

Last year we were awarded an NSF grant to improve cling's sustainability 
and make it a standalone tool. We thank the LLVM Foundation Board for 
supporting us with a non-binding letter of collaboration which was 
essential for getting this grant.


Background
===

Cling is a C++ interpreter built on top of clang and llvm. In a 
nutshell, it uses clang's incremental compilation facilities to process 
code chunk-by-chunk by assuming an ever-growing translation unit [5]. 
Then code is lowered into llvm IR and run by the llvm jit. Cling has 
implemented some language "extensions" such as execution statements on 
the global scope and error recovery. Cling is in the core of HEP -- it 
is heavily used during data analysis of exabytes of particle physics 
data coming from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other particle 
physics experiments.


Plans
===

The project foresees three main directions -- move parts of cling 
upstream along with the clang and llvm features that enable them; extend 
and generalize the language interoperability layer around cling; and 
extend and generalize the OpenCL/CUDA support in cling. We are at the 
early stages of the project and this email intends to be an RFC for the 
first part -- upstreaming parts of cling. Please do share your thoughts 
on the rest, too.


Moving Parts of Cling Upstream
---

Over the years we have slowly moved some patches upstream. However we 
still have around 100 patches in the clang fork. Most of them are in the 
context of extending the incremental compilation support for clang. The 
incremental compilation poses some challenges in the clang 
infrastructure. For example, we need to tune CodeGen to work with 
multiple llvm::Module instances, and finalize per each 
end-of-translation unit (we have multiple of them). Other changes 
include small adjustments in the FileManager's caching mechanism, and 
bug fixes in the SourceManager (code which can be reached mostly from 
within our setup). One conclusion we can draw from our research is that 
the clang infrastructure fits amazingly well to something which was not 
its main use case. The grand total of our diffs against clang-9 is: `62 
files changed, 1294 insertions(+), 231 deletions(-)`. Cling is currently 
being upgraded from llvm-5 to llvm-9.

A major weakness of cling's infrastructure is that it does not work with 
the clang Action infrastructure due to the lack of an 
IncrementalAction.  A possible way forward would be to implement a 
clang::IncrementalAction as a starting point. This way we should be able 
to reduce the amount of setup necessary to use the incremental 
infrastructure in clang. However, this will be a bit of a testing 
challenge -- cling lives downstream and some of the new code may be 
impossible to pick straight away and use. Building a mainline example 
tool such as clang-repl which gives us a way to test that incremental 
case or repurpose the already existing clang-interpreter may  be able to 
address the issue. The major risk of the task is avoiding code in the 
clang mainline which is untested by its HEP production environment.
There are several other types of patches to the ROOT fork of Clang, 
including ones  in the context of performance,towards  C++ modules 
support (D41416), and storage (does not have a patch yet but has an open 
projects entry and somebody working on it). These patches can be 
considered in parallel independently on the rest.

Extend and Generalize the Language Interoperability Layer Around Cling
---

HEP has extensive experience with on-demand python interoperability 
using cppyy[6], which is built around the type information provided by 
cling. Unlike tools with custom parsers such as swig and sip and tools 
built on top of C-APIs such as boost.python and pybind11, cling can 
provide information about memory management patterns (eg refcounting) 
and instantiate templates on the fly.We feel that functionality may not 
be of general interest to the llvm community but we will prepare another 
RFC and send it here later on to gather feedback.


Extend and Generalize the OpenCL/CUDA Support in Cling
---

Cling can incrementally compile CUDA code [7-8] allowing easier set up 
and enabling some interesting use cases. There are a number of planned 
improvements including talking to HIP [9] and SYCL to support more 
hardware architectures.



The primary focus of our work is to upstreaming functionality required 
to build an incremental compiler and rework cling build against vanilla 
clang and llvm. The last two points are to give the scope of the work 
which we will be doing the next 2-3 years. We will send here RFCs for 
both of them to trigger technical discussion if there is interest in 
pursuing this direction.


Collaboration
===

Open source development nowadays relies on reviewers. LLVM is no 
different and we will probably disturb a good number of people in the 
community ;)We would like to invite anybody interested in joining our 
incremental C++ activities to our open every second week calls. 
Announcements will be done via google group: compiler-research-announce 
(https://groups.google.com/g/compiler-research-announce).



Many thanks!


David & Vassil

Read more Also: Cling C++ Interpreter Looking To Upstream More Code Into LLVM

This week in KDE: New features galore!

Tons and tons of awesome new features and UI polish landed this week, alongside an equally weighty ton of important bugfixes. Read more

Elive 3.8.14 beta released

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 3.8.14 This new version includes: Kernel updated to 5.6.14 retrowave special theme themes, designs, icons improvements and more customizations included bootup with a much more friendly graphical menu, it now remembers your last selected OS, all the options are in the same menu instead of submenus, disabled useless recovery options, improved resolution, fixed wallpaper issue on encrypted installations SWAP space is much more performant now, feedbacks welcome Read more