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Graphics: Developing KWin Wayland, Mouse DPI, Mesa's RADV Vulkan Driver and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Developing KWin Wayland

    On the last few weeks I’ve been looking at KWin more closely than in the past. It’s definitely a special beast within KDE and I figured it could be useful to give some hints on how to develop and test it.

    When developing something, first step is always to compile and get the code installed and usable. It’s especially delicate because when we mess up our system becomes quite unusable so it needs to be done with care. To prevent major damage, we can probably try installing it into a separate prefix (See this blog post, change kate for kwin).
    Second step is to make sure that modifying the code will modify the behaviour you perceive. This is what we’ll focus on in this piece.

    Bear in mind most of the things I’m saying here are possibly obvious and not news, but it’s still good to have it written in case you feel like building on this (not fun to come up with) experience.

  • Peter Hutterer: High resolution wheel scrolling in the desktop stack

    This is a follow up from the kernel support for high-resolution wheel scrolling which you totally forgot about because it's already more then a year in the past and seriously, who has the attention span these days to remember this. Anyway, I finally found time and motivation to pick this up again and I started lining up the pieces like cans, for it only to be shot down by the commentary of strangers on the internet. The Wayland merge request lists the various pieces (libinput, wayland, weston, mutter, gtk and Xwayland) but for the impatient there's also an Fedora 32 COPR. For all you weirdos inexplicably not running the latest Fedora, well, you'll have to compile this yourself, just like I did.

    Let's recap: in v5.0 the kernel added new axes REL_WHEEL_HI_RES and REL_HWHEEL_HI_RES for all devices. On devices that actually support high-resolution wheel scrolling (Logitech and Microsoft mice, primarily) you'll get multiple hires events before the now-legacy REL_WHEEL events. On all other devices those two are in sync.

  • AMD ACO Backend Implements 8-bit / 16-bit Storage Capabilities - Needed For DOOM Eternal

    It's been another busy week for Mesa's RADV Vulkan driver with the Valve-backed ACO compiler back-end alternative to AMDGPU LLVM.

    ACO, which has been wildly popular with Radeon Linux gamers for offering quicker load times and often better overall performance, continues working quite well though isn't the default yet and has been missing some features in comparison to AMDGPU LLVM.

  • NIR Vectorization Lands In Mesa 20.1 For Big Intel Graphics Performance Boost

    The recently covered NIR vectorization pass ported from AMD's ACO back-end for improving the open-source Intel Linux graphics performance has landed now in Mesa 20.1.

    This vectorization pass for NIR came about last month and based on the AMD ACO optimization while with the Intel implementation benefits both OpenGL and Vulkan with this pass being at the NIR intermediate representation level.

High Resolution Wheel Scrolling Back To Being Finished Up

  • High Resolution Wheel Scrolling Back To Being Finished Up For The Linux Desktop

    Added over a year ago to the mainline Linux kernel was the high resolution mouse wheel scrolling support. While the support landed on kernel-side for to provide "buttery smooth" wheel scrolling, the work has yet to be wrapped up on the user-space side for making this a reality on the Linux desktop.

    Nearly a year ago to the day we reported the Wayland support for high resolution scroll wheel being worked on by longtime Linux input expert Peter Hutterer. Since then all has been quiet on this functionality for Linux.

Linux to Get High Resolution Wheel Scrolling

  • Linux to Get High Resolution Wheel Scrolling

    Work on high resolution wheel scrolling for the Linux desktop is being completed.

    The Linux desktop has come a very long way in a short time. But there are a couple of features that lag behind the likes of macOS—such as multi touch gestures and smooth wheel scrolling. That all began to change about a year ago, when high resolution wheel scrolling was merged into the mainline Linux kernel, by adding new axes REL_WHEEL_HI_RES and REL_HWHEEL_HI_RES. However, since that kernel addition, work on the feature fell to the wayside.

    Around the same time as support was added to the kernel, Peter Hutterer began working on integrating high resolution mouse wheel scrolling support into Wayland. However, that work also ground to a halt and nothing came of Hutterer’s efforts.

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