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The Participation Culture

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OSS

I am lurking on the OpenMoko mailing lists. This is an educational experience for me. Although I have participated in many heated discussions concerning Free software, I have never watched such a high-profile full-fledged Free software project start from the ground up.

It's fascinating watching different sorts of geeks interact.
For instance, currently there is a debate concerning the necessity of a hardware-specific emulator for the purposes of development. As the hardware itself isn't stabilized, one group assumes a full hardware emulator will be of little use emulating a moving target. Another group argues there is no way to properly develop without a solid emulator.

Both sides are correct, of course. There is utility in early participation, with rough edges and downright dangerous areas. The early adopters help define the shape of the project. But there are other early adopters who wish to spend their time coding applications, not fiddling around with changes in the development environment.

The tone of the debate can be somewhat rude, occasionally. Not all participants are polite at all times. Some people are sometimes sulky, others may become a bit grumpy. Others maintain Real Or Simulated Respect (ROSR) at all times. The various lists sometimes border on ordered chaos, with everyone going in different directions, following the path that interests them most.

The curious thing is, this all works. Somehow, everything fits together.

More Here.

More in Tux Machines

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

  • SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources
    At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference.
  • Participating at #Scale17x
    Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17. The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers. As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday.
  • Snapcraft Summit Montreal
    Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month. The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack.

today's howtos

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

Ever wish you could draw on the Linux desktop or write on the screen? Well, there’s a new GNOME Shell extension that lets you do exactly that: draw on the Linux desktop. You may want to point out a bug, highlight a feature, or provide some guidance to someone else by sending them an annotated screenshot. In this short post we’ll show you how to install the add-on and how to use it. Read more

Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2. Fedora has been pushing for a Python 2 to Python 3 migration for many cycles now -- as most Linux distributions have -- while with Fedora 31 they are planning a "mass Python 2 package removal" if necessary. They are planning to closely track the state of packages depending upon Python 2 to either drop the packages or allow packagers to easily abandon Python 2 parts of programs. Read more