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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • InTrain: University of Bologna Launches Open Source RSI Training Platform

    Long before the current coronavirus situation made remote work and education the new normal, Gabriele Carioli and Nicoletta Spinolo launched InTrain, a free, open-source, online training platform for remote simultaneous interpreters.

  • Add Authentication to Jitsi Meet

    By default Jitsi Meet is open for everyone. So everyone can just put in a name for a conference room and start a conference. As my Jitsi Meet instance is not running on a dedicated server but shares the server with other important functions like DNS, mail etc., I do not want that everyone is using Jitsi without my permission.

    So I needed to add some kind of authentication to Jitsi which means, that only certain authenticated users can start a conference. Once started everyone then can join the conference without further authentication just like before.

    The steps to provide that, are documented in this article under the subject “Secure domain”.

    I just followed the steps 1 to 4 and it worked fine afterwards.

  • Videoconferencing Options in the Age of Pandemic

    At first the IT dept. at university said no. But he protested. They looked at the code, (it is open source), and after a few hours of bit wrangling, decided it was ok.

    They walled off a server, locked it down, and installed “Jitsi”. The IT guys were impressed. It takes a small amount of resources. But is fairly light weight for a big university system.

  • Radeon Open Compute 3.3 Released But Still Without Official Navi Support

    This week marked the release of ROCm 3.3 as the newest version of the Radeon Open Compute stack.

    Radeon Open Compute 3.3 brings support for multi-version installations so multiple versions of ROCm can be installed on the same system albeit the same kernel driver will be at play. This allows for different versions of the ROCm user-space libraries like HCC, ROCm Math Libraries, MIOpen, and others to all be on the same platform as long as the Kernel Fusion Driver is compatible with all.

More in Tux Machines

VirtualBox 6.1.10 Released with Support for Linux Kernel 5.7, Bug Fixes

Oracle released VirtualBox 6.1.10 as a minor maintenance update to its open-source and cross-platform virtualization software to add support for the latest Linux kernel series and fixes some minor bugs. VirtualBox 6.1.10 comes exactly three weeks after version 6.1.8, which added support for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2, Oracle Linux 8.2, and CentOS Linux 8.2 operating systems. It’s a minor update that’s mainly here to add support for the latest Linux 5.7 kernel series for both Linux guest and Linux hosts running Linux kernel 5.7, even though most distributions haven’t upgraded yet. But Oracle is always one step ahead, so if you’re distro is already running Linux kernel 5.7 or will soon be powered by it, you can now update VirtualBox to version 6.1.10 and safely use your virtual machines. Read more

Python Programming

  • Cosmic Python

    Folks I've written a new book! Along with my coauthor Bob, we are proud to release "Architecture Patterns with Python", which you can find out more about at cosmicpython.com. The cosmic soubriquet is a little joke, Cosmos being the opposite of Chaos in ancient Greek, so we want to propose patterns to minimise chaos in your applications.

  • PyCharm: Smart execution of R code

    In this release, we also introduced some stability improvements and enhancements for resolving and autocompleting named arguments.

  • Python Bytes: #184 Too many ways to wait with await?
  • Return Multiple Values from A Python Function

    The function is used in any programming language to run a specific block of code multiple times when require and organize the code properly. Sometimes, this requires reading the return value from the function for the programming purposes. The return value of the function is stored in a variable. Python functions can return both single and multiple values. This tutorial shows how multiple values can be returned from Python functions with multiple variables, objects, tuples, lists, and dictionaries.

  • Reading and Writing Excel (XLSX) Files in Python with the Pandas Library

    Just like with all other types of files, you can use the Pandas library to read and write Excel files using Python as well. In this short tutorial, we are going to discuss how to read and write Excel files via DataFrames. In addition to simple reading and writing, we will also learn how to write multiple DataFrames into an Excel file, how to read specific rows and columns from a spreadsheet, and how to name single and multiple sheets within a file before doing anything.

  • Writing the Factorial Program in Python

    The factorial of a number is the number that you get after multiplying all numbers from 1 to that number. The factorial of a number is denoted by the ‘!’ symbol. For example, if we want to find out the factorial of 4, denoted 4!, then the result would be 1x2x3x4 = 24. There are many ways to find out the factorial of a number. The factorial can be determined in Python using the built-in function for loop and recursive functions. This tutorial shows how the factorial of a number can be determined using various functions of Python.

  • How to Use Boxplot in Python

    A box plot is used to summarize data sets by using the box and whisker plot method. This function helps users to understand the data summary properly. Box plots can be very useful when we want to know how the data is distributed and spread. Three types of quartiles are used in the box plot to plot the data. These values include the median, maximum, minimum, upper-quartile, and lower-quartile statistical values. A box plot summarizes this data in the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles. This tutorial will show you how to create box plots based on a given data set using the pandas and seaborn libraries of Python.

  • How to Use Urllib in Python

    Python contains a module named urllib for handling Uniform Resource Locator (URL)-related tasks. This module is installed in Python 3 by default, and fetches URLs of different protocols via the urlopen() function. Urllib can be used for many purposes, such as reading website content, making HTTP and HTTPS requests, sending request headers, and retrieving response headers. The urllib module contains many other modules for working with URLs, such as urllib.request, urllib.parse, and urllib.error, among others. This tutorial will show you how to use the Urllib module in Python.

  • Python 3.8.3 : Using the fabric python module - part 001.

today's howtos

Bifrost meets GNOME: Onward & upward to zero graphics blobs

In our last blog update for Panfrost, the free and open-source graphics driver for modern Mali GPUs, we announced initial support for the Bifrost architecture. We have since extended this support to all major features of OpenGL ES 2.0 and even some features of desktop OpenGL 2.1. With only free software, a Mali G31 chip can now run Wayland compositors with zero-copy graphics, including GNOME 3. We can run every scene in glmark2-es2, and 3D games like Neverball can be played. In addition, we can support hardware-accelerated video players mpv and Kodi. Screenshots above are from a Mali G31 board running Panfrost. All of the above is included in upstream Mesa with no out-of-tree patches required, with the upcoming Bifrost support enabled via the PAN_MESA_DEBUG=bifrost environmental variable. Read more More: LWN