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elementary OS: Hera Updates for March, 2020

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OS

Fresh on the heels of the AppCenter for Everyone Remote Sprint, we still managed to push out a good amount of updates over the course of March (and early April), bundled up in an OS 5.1.3 update. Let’s dive into what’s new.

We continued our quest to make Code the best editor for elementary OS this month. A file’s Git status now shows in its tooltip in the project sidebar, making it easier to understand what the status icons mean—especially if you’re colorblind or just don’t remember. We also added an option for explicit case-sensitive find/replace for those times when you want to find or replace the word foo but not Foo.

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Also: elementary OS 5.1.3 New Features Revealed

Elementary OS 5.1.3 Reveals New Updates And Release Tool

  • Elementary OS 5.1.3 Reveals New Updates And Release Tool

    Ahead of the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS-based next Elementary OS 6, the current v5.1 Hera gets several new updates with the third point release v5.1.3. Concluding the update for March and early April, Cassidy James Blaede, Co-founder and CXO of Elementary OS, also revealed a new tool to track each package release.

elementary OS 5.1.3 released with performance improvements

  • elementary OS 5.1.3 released with performance improvements and bugfixes

    Courtesy of the development team’s efforts made in March and early April, elementary OS 5.1.3 is now available to the existing users and that too, with several fundamental changes that should get many of you interested.

    For those of you who are unfamiliar with this operating system, allow FOSSLinux to give you a brief introduction. Based on Ubuntu, elementary OS serves as a preferred gateway for users migrating to Linux from Windows or macOS systems.

    [...]

    Since this is a minor update, what you’d usually expect is a few insignificant improvements and bug fixes. However, from the looks of the official blog post, we can tell that a lot more effort has been put into this update.

    First of all, it can be seen that the focal point of this update has been Code, which is the operating system’s code editor—duh! Keeping in mind all the colorblind folks and those who find it hard to remember things, the developers integrated the Git status of files into the tooltip of the project sidebar.

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