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UbuntuDDE is a New Linux Distro That Brings The Beautiful Deepin Desktop to Ubuntu

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Deepin is a beautiful desktop environment with an intuitive UI. UbuntuDDE project combines the power of Ubuntu and the beauty of Deepin.
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An Exciting New Version Of Ubuntu 20.04 Offers The Deepin...

UbuntuDDE: This New Linux Distro Combines Ubuntu 20.04

  • UbuntuDDE: This New Linux Distro Combines Ubuntu 20.04 And Deepin Desktop

    Have you ever thought about combining the power of the most popular Linux distro Ubuntu with the out-of-the-box Deepin Desktop? Well, if you think this could be the best combination, then UbuntuDDE, a new Linux distribution, can be the best choice for you.

    UbuntuDDE is a new entrant in the world of Linux desktops packed with the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Deepin desktop environment. There’s no doubt that Deepin is one of the most beautiful desktops that somewhat lacks popularity. And shipping it on top of beginner-friendly Ubuntu results in an elegant and powerful Linux distribution.

UbuntuDDE Remix Beta 20.04 - 20200410 Run Through

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Security and FUD

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    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (dovecot, dpdk, knot-resolver, and unbound), Mageia (ant, libexif, and php), SUSE (libmspack), and Ubuntu (php5, php7.0, php7.2, php7.3, php7.4 and unbound).

  • 5 Kernel Live Patching Tools That Will Help To Run Linux Servers Without Reboots

    Within IT organizations, there are processes and practices so routine that they are invisible. It doesn’t matter if such processes and practices are flawed, or if there exists a better way: if something has worked for a few years, people stop looking for alternatives. This perfectly describes current approaches to kernel patching. Right now, most organizations patch the servers by planning reboot cycles. Because rebooting the server fleet is a headache that causes downtime, people put it off for as long as they can. Which means patches aren’t applied as early as possible. This gap between patch issue and its application means risk, malpractice and may cause non-compliance. This standard approach to kernel patching exposes servers to malicious intent by threat actors on multiple attack vectors, putting IT organizations at risk of major security issues. Anyone tasked with keeping their organization safe from cyber attacks should be seeking a better way to run Linux servers without reboots (ideally, for years). In this article you will learn what is live patching, how it ensures the uptime, what 5 tools are available to help you run servers for years – without reboots and what are the advantages and drawbacks of each tool.

  • USB systems may have some serious security flaws - especially on Linux [Ed: ZDNet's FUD is going places; the tests were mostly done on Linux, so it's hardly shocking that the bugs found were in Linux. But it's presented as Linux being particularly bad.]

    Academics have developed a new tool that allowed them to discover 26 previously unidentified vulnerabilities in the USB driver stack used by many popular operating systems including Linux, macOS, Windows and FreeBSD.

  • New fuzzing tool picks up insecure USB driver code

    Matthias Payer at the federal polytechnic school in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Hui Peng at Purdue University, United States, said [pdf] that they leveraged open-source components such as QEMU processor emulator to design a tool that's low-cost and hardware independent, called USBFuzz.

  • New fuzzing tool for USB drivers uncovers bugs in Linux, macOS, Windows

    With a new fuzzing tool created specifically for testing the security of USB drivers, researchers have discovered more than two dozen vulnerabilities in a variety of operating systems. “USBFuzz discovered a total of 26 new bugs, including 16 memory bugs of high security impact in various Linux subsystems (USB core, USB sound, and network), one bug in FreeBSD, three in macOS (two resulting in an unplanned reboot and one freezing the system), and four in Windows 8 and Windows 10 (resulting in Blue Screens of Death), and one bug in the Linux USB host controller driver and another one in a USB camera driver,” Hui Peng and Mathias Payer explained.

  • NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program

    The U.S. National Security Agency says the same Russian military hacking group that interfered in the 2016 presidential election and unleashed a devastating malware attack the following year has been exploiting a major email server program since last August or earlier. The timing of the agency's advisory Thursday was unusual considering that the critical vulnerability in the Exim Mail Transfer Agent — which mostly runs on Unix-type operating systems — was identified 11 months ago, when a patch was issued. Exim is so widely used — though far less known than such commercial alternatives as Microsoft's proprietary Exchange — that some companies and government agencies that run it may still not have patched the vulnerability, said Jake Williams, president of Rendition Infosec and a former U.S. government hacker.

KDE: Akademy 2020 and GSoC 2020

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  • Status report: Community Bonding

    I’m checking in today to let you know what I did in my GSoC project these past weeks. This Community Bonding period was really wonderful; although I’ve been more or less involved with the project since 2016, I’ve acquainted myself with the efforts of each of the members, and so far it’s been a wonderful experience. During these past weeks, I’ve been preparing for the coding period by talking with Boudewijn and Wolthera about the particulars of Krita’s file format and build system. The objectives for the past two meetings were:

  • GSoC'20 with KDE

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu MATE 20.04 LTS, BSD Now and More

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    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu MATE 20.04 LTS and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • BSD Now 352: Introducing Randomness

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Quarkus, a Kubernetes-native Java runtime, now fully supported by Red Hat

  • Quarkus, a Kubernetes-native Java runtime, now fully supported by Red Hat

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  • Red Hat Tosses Its Weight Behind Quarkus

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