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Mozilla Firefox 75 Is Now Available for Download, Here’s What’s New

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Moz/FF

Development on the Firefox 75 release kicked off a month ago and I already reported on the new features, which include a revamped address bar that not only looks better on smaller screens but also makes it easier for users to access their favorite sites with less typing.

Mozilla Firefox 75 also improves HTTPS compatibility with misconfigured web servers by locally caching all Web PKI Certificate Authority certificates trusted by Mozilla in the background, by default.

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Firefox Zero-Day Flaws Exploited in the Wild Get Patched

  • Firefox Zero-Day Flaws Exploited in the Wild Get Patched

    Mozilla Foundation rushes patches to fix bugs in its browser that could allow for remote code execution.

    Mozilla patched two Firefox browser zero-day vulnerabilities actively being exploited in the wild. The flaws, both use-after-free bugs, have been part of “targeted attacks in the wild,” according to a Mozilla Foundation security advisory posted Friday.

    Both bugs have critical ratings and allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or trigger crashes on machines running versions of Firefox prior to 74.0.1 and its business-friendly Firefox Extended Support Release 68.6.1. The bugs impact Firefox browser versions running on Windows, macOS and Linux operating systems. Details are scant on how either bug (CVE-2020-6819 and CVE-2020-6820) are specifically being exploited by adversaries.

    Tracked as CVE-2020-6819, this bug is a use-after free vulnerability tied to the browser component “nsDocShell destructor”. The Firefox nsDocShell is a client of the nsI-HttpChannel API, a function of the browser related to reading HTTP headers.

Firefox 75 Released, Official Flatpak Build Now Available

  • Firefox 75 Released, Official Flatpak Build Now Available

    We told you that a Firefox Flatpak build was coming to Flathub, the de-facto Flatpak App Store, a few weeks back. With the release of Firefox 75 the first Firefox Flatpak release is formally available to all.

    Flatpak aside, Linux users of Firefox also benefit from word selection in the address bar and search box that is consistent with macOS and Windows platforms, e.g., a single click selects no words; a double click selects a whole word; a triple click selects all words.

Firefox 75 Released With Flatpak Support, Wayland Improvements

  • Firefox 75 Released With Flatpak Support, Wayland Improvements

    Mozilla has released Firefox 75.0 as what is a big update for Linux users.

    Firefox 75.0 ships with good Flatpak support as an easier means of deploying the web browser on the Linux desktop.

    Also significant for Firefox 75 on Linux is Firefox on Wayland having full WebGL and working VA-API support as some long overdue improvements.

    Firefox 75.0 also brings a number of search improvements, improved HTTPS compatibility, security fixes, support for the loading attribute on img elements to improve bandwidth/memory efficiency, and various other developer additions.

Firefox 75 will respect ‘nosniff’ for Page Loads

  • Firefox 75 will respect ‘nosniff’ for Page Loads

    Prior to being able to display a web page within a browser the rendering engine checks and verifies the MIME type of the document being loaded. In case of an html page, for example, the rendering engine expects a MIME type of ‘text/html’. Unfortunately, time and time again, misconfigured web servers incorrectly use a MIME type which does not match the actual type of the resource. If strictly enforced, this mismatch in types would downgrade a users experience. More precisely, the rendering engine within a browser will try to interpret the resource based on the ruleset for the provided MIME type and at some point simply would have to give up trying to display the resource. To compensate, Firefox implements a MIME type sniffing algorithm – amongst other techniques Firefox inspects the initial bytes of a file and searches for ‘Magic-Numbers’ which allows it to determine the MIME type of a file independently of the one set by the server.

Firefox 75 Released With Flatpak Support; Firefox On Wayland Now

  • Firefox 75 Released With Flatpak Support; Firefox On Wayland Now Has H.264 VA-API And Full WebGL Support

    The Firefox 75 release comes with a revamped address bar (screenshot above) with a clean search experience that's optimized for small laptop screens, with top sites appearing when you select the address. There's also improved readability of search suggestions, with a focus on new search terms.

    Also, when clicking on the address bar and the search bar, the behavior is now the same across Linux, macOS and Windows desktops: a single click selects all without primary selection, a double click selects a word, and a triple click selects all with primary selection (previously this worked differently on Linux).

Mozilla Firefox 75.0 Released with Flatpak Support

  • Mozilla Firefox 75.0 Released with Flatpak Support

    Mozilla Firefox 75.0 was released today. Ubuntu security & updates repositories has published the packages for Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Ubuntu 19.10.

    Mozilla Firefox 75.0 comes with revamped address bar, which brings clean search experience. On Linux, the behavior when clicking on the Address Bar and the Search Bar changes: a single click selects all without primary selection, a double click selects a word, and a triple click selects all with primary selection.

    The new release also brings official Flatpak support, improves HTTPS compatibility, and various security fixes. See release note for details.

Firefox 75.0

  • Firefox 75.0

    Firefox 75.0 has been released. New features include improvements to the address bar, making search easier, all trusted Web PKI Certificate Authority certificates known to Mozilla will be cached locally, and Firefox is available as a Flatpak. See the release notes for more details.

Mozilla on the Latest Firefox Release

  • Keeping Firefox working for you during challenging times

    There’s likely not a single person reading this who hasn’t been impacted in some way by the COVID-19 pandemic. We know that school and office closings and “shelter in place” orders have taken a toll on many of you and have led to large adjustments in day-to-day routines.

    The team at Firefox is no different. As people have been adjusting to the new normal, our product leadership and release management looked into our teams’ capabilities and new limitations. Based on this, we believe we can maintain our 2020 Firefox release schedule as we navigate this global crisis together.

    Our Firefox staff and contributors are used to working remotely, including doing their tests on remote hardware. We often work with people in different timezones, whose regional culture is different. We’ve built empathy into our systems for handling difficult or unexpected circumstances. These strengths are what allow us to continue to make progress where some of our competitors have had to slow down or stop work.

    We are launching our next release, Firefox 75, today, April 7, as scheduled. We will continue to monitor both internal and external feedback and remain open to making future adjustments.

    We know that this is a time when our users depend on Firefox to provide uninterrupted access to vital government and health services, so we have taken steps to avoid shipping changes that might negatively impact user experience or possibly break these websites.

  • Latest Firefox updates address bar, making search easier than ever

    We have all been spending a lot more time online lately whether it’s for work, helping our kids stay connected to their schools or keeping in touch with loved ones. While connecting is more important than ever as we face this pandemic together, we’ve also been relying on the power of “search” to access information, news and resources through the browser. Today’s Firefox release makes it even easier to get to the things that matter most to you online. Bringing this improved functionality to Firefox is our way of continuing to serve you now and in the future.

    [...]

    With a single click in the address bar, you’ve got access to your most visited sites. And if by chance you have that site already opened in another tab but can’t find it, we’ve highlighted a text shortcut next to it (in teal!) so you can easily jump to that tab rather than going through the gazillion tabs you already have open. This also works for any page you’ve searched, and may not realize you’ve already opened it.

  • Firefox 75: Ambitions for April

    Even in these times of isolation, our engineering teams have adapted, kept focused, and worked hard to bring you another exciting new edition of Firefox. On the developer tools side, you’ll find instant evaluation in the console, evnt breakpoints for WebSockets, and many other things besides. On the web platform side, new additions include HTML lazy loading for images, the CSS min(), max(), and clamp() functions, public static class fields, and additions to Web Animations API support.

Firefox 75 Released with Revamped Address Bar. Download Now.

  • Firefox 75 Released with Revamped Address Bar. Download Now.

    The most popular and privacy-focused modern web browser Firefox released the latest version 75 with the revamped address bar and many many changes.

    Used by millions of home, and enterprise users, Firefox with each release, adding more features for its users including some privacy-focused items as well.

Firefox 75 arrives with revamped address bar

  • Firefox 75 arrives with revamped address bar, Mozilla sticks to 2020 schedule despite coronavirus

    Mozilla today launched Firefox 75 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Firefox 75 includes a revamped address bar with significant search improvements, a few performance tweaks, and a handful of developer features. You can download Firefox 75 for desktop now from Firefox.com, and all existing users should be able to upgrade to it automatically. According to Mozilla, Firefox has about 250 million active users, making it a major platform for web developers to consider.

    When the coronavirus crisis took hold, millions found themselves spending more time in their browsers as they learn and work from home. But the crisis is also impacting software developers. Google was forced to pause its Chrome releases, which typically arrive every six weeks. Ultimately, Chrome 81 was delayed, Chrome 82 is being skipped altogether, and Chrome 83 has been moved up a few weeks. Microsoft has followed suit with Edge’s release schedule, consistent with Google’s open source Chromium project, which both Chrome and Edge are based on. Mozilla wants to make clear it is not in the same boat. The company took an indirect jab at Google and Microsoft today, saying: “We’ve built empathy into our systems for handling difficult or unexpected circumstances. These strengths are what allow us to continue to make progress where some of our competitors have had to slow down or stop work.”

Mozilla: Firefox 75 gets this new address bar, but we're pausing

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