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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr, gnutls28, and libmtp), Fedora (cyrus-sasl, firefox, glibc, squid, and telnet), Gentoo (firefox), Mageia (dcraw, firefox, kernel, kernel-linus, librsvg, and python-nltk), openSUSE (firefox, haproxy, icu, and spamassassin), Red Hat (nodejs:10, openstack-manila, python-django, python-XStatic-jQuery, and telnet), Slackware (firefox), SUSE (bluez, exiv2, and libxslt), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 191 - Security scanners are all terrible

    Josh and Kurt talk about security scanners. They're all pretty bad today, but there are some things we can do to make them better. Step one is to understand the problem. Do you know why you're running the scanner and what the reports mean?

  • Misconfigured Docker API Ports Targeted by Kinsing Malware

    Security researchers observed an attack campaign that targeted misconfigured Docker API ports with samples of Kinsing malware.

    According to Aqua Security, the campaign began when it capitalized on an unprotected Docker API port to run a Ubuntu container.

    The command used for creating the Ubuntu container included a shell script “d.sh.” By means of its 600+ lines of code, the shell script began by disabling security measures, clearing logs and disabling other malware and cryptominer samples. It’s then that the command killed rival malicious Docker containers before loading its Kinsing payload.

  • L1d Cache Flush On Context Switch Moves Forward For Linux In Light Of Vulnerabilities

    A new patch series sent out just under one month ago was providing opt-in L1 data cache flushing on context switching. That work has now been revived again and now with documentation added it's clear that this work is being done in response to a recent CVE being made public.

    The patches originally sent out by an Amazon engineer characterized the work as for the "paranoid due to the recent snoop assisted data sampling vulnerabilities, to flush their L1D on being switched out. This protects their data from being snooped or leaked via side channels after the task has context switched out."

More on Docker

  • Docker Users Targeted with Crypto Malware Via Exposed APIs [Ed: People who use things they do not understand can leave holes, but this is not the fault of the software]

    Hackers are attempting to compromise Docker servers en masse via exposed APIs in order to spread cryptocurrency mining malware, according to researchers.

    Aqua Security claimed to have tracked the organized campaign for several months, revealing that thousands of attempts to hijack misconfigured Docker Daemon API ports are taking place almost every single day.

    “In this attack, the attackers exploit a misconfigured Docker API port to run an Ubuntu container with the kinsing malicious malware, which in turn runs a cryptominer and then attempts to spread the malware to other containers and hosts,” it explained.

    The Ubuntu container itself is designed to disable security measures and clear logs, and kills applications on the system including any other malware, as well as downloading the kinsing malware designed to mine for digital currency on the compromised Docker host.

Misconfigured Containers Again Targeted by Cryptominer Malware

  • Misconfigured Containers Again Targeted by Cryptominer Malware

    An attack group is searching for insecure containers exposing the Docker API and then installing a program that attempts to mine cryptocurrency. It's not the first time.
    Attackers are searching for containers that expose a misconfigured port for the Docker API to add another container to do their bidding and run malicious code to mine cryptocurrency, container security firm Aqua Security stated in an April 3 advisory.

    The campaign appears to target containers that allow Docker commands to be executed without authentication, with — in some cases — more than a hundred scans targeting each IP address on the Internet every day. A search using the port-scanning service Shodan revealed that some 6,000 IP addresses may have vulnerable installations of Docker, says Idan Revivo, head of cybersecurity research for Aqua Security.

Kinsing Malware Hits Container API Ports With Thousands...

More on 'Kinsing'

  • If you don't cover your Docker daemon API port you'll have a hell of a time... because cryptocreeps are hunting for it

    Some Docker installations are getting hammered by malware skiddies hoping to mine digital cash using other people's CPU time.

    Infosec outfit Aqua – no, not the Barbie Girl band – said miscreants have spotted that a decent number of Docker deployments are lazily or inadvertently exposing the daemon API port to the public internet with no protection. It's a fairly common error that hackers have exploited in the past to mine digital coins, although lately we're told there have been thousands of infection attempts daily via this interface, all involving a piece of Linux malware dubbed Kinsing.

    "These are the highest numbers we’ve seen in some time, far exceeding what we have witnessed to date," noted researcher Gal Singer this week.

    "We therefore believe that these attacks are directed by actors with sufficient resources and the infrastructure needed to carry out and sustain such attacks, and that this is not an improvised endeavor."

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