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GNU MediaGoblin: We’re still here!

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GNU

Hello Goblin-Lovers! [tap tap] Is this thing still on? … Great! Well, we’ve had a few polite questions as to what’s happening in MediaGoblin-land, given our last blog post was a few years back. Let’s talk about that.

While development on MediaGoblin has slowed over the last few years, work has continued steadily, with significant improvements such as multi-resolution video (Vijeth Aradhya), video subtitles (Saksham) and a bunch of minor improvements and bug-fixes. Like most community-driven free software projects, progress only happens when people show up and make it happen. See below for a list of the wonderful people who have contributed over the last few years. Thank you all very much!

In recent years, Chris Lemmer Webber has stepped back from the role of much-loved project leader to focus on ActivityPub and the standardisation of federated social networking protocols. That process was a lot of work but ultimately successful with ActivityPub becoming a W3C recommendation in 2018 and going on to be adopted by a range of social networking platforms. Congratulations to Chris, Jessica and the other authors on the success of ActivityPub! In particular though, we would like to express our gratitude for Chris’s charismatic leadership, community organising and publicity work on MediaGoblin, not to mention the coding and artwork contributions. Thanks Chris!

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GNU MediaGoblin Announces They Are Still Alive

  • GNU MediaGoblin Announces They Are Still Alive

    One of several GNU projects that have been silent in recent years is MediaGoblin, the effort to provide a free and decentralized web platform for sharing of digital media.

    It's been four years already since the last release of GNU MediaGoblin, which was version 0.9 that offered Python 3 support and better OAuth security and other improvements. Since then this multimedia web platform has been silent.

    But the MediaGoblin crew announced today that they are in fact still working on the project. They acknowledge work has slowed in recent years but have been working towards new features like multi-resolution video, video subtitles, and other improvements and fixes.

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