Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn CoffeeScript

    CoffeeScript is a very succinct programming language that transcompiles into JavaScript, so there is no interpretation at runtime. The syntax is inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell, and implements many features from these three languages.

    CoffeeScript is closely related to JavaScript without having its eccentricities. However, CoffeeScript offers more than fixing many of the oddities of JavaScript, as it has some useful features including array comprehensions, prototype aliases and classes. It allows developers to write less code to get more done.

    CoffeeScript is a new language, first appearing in 2009. The first stable release shortly followed in December 2010.

  • Robert Foss: Speed up `git log --graph` 18x times

    This is a speed up of ~18x, compared to the older versions.

    The way this works is that commit-graph file stores the commit graph structure along with some extra metadata to speed up graph in the .git/objects/info directory.

  • 15 years of Git: How to get started or learn something new

    x
    If there's anything that's changed software in the past two decades, Git is at the top of the list.

    If you don't use Git personally, you might think it's just a tech fad, an incidental darling among developers just because it was created by the same person who started the Linux project itself. There may be some truth to that, but Git does manage to achieve some feats that no other industry has managed. With Git, developers spread all over the world are able to work on the same code, literally at the same time, with a history of every change made, and then merge all the work together to result in a finished product. The complexity is enormous, and so the tool itself can get complex, but in the end, it's a major component in keeping the software industry running.

    Whether you know Git or not, you'll very likely encounter it should you dig deep enough into open source software or enter into computer science. Whether you use Git to just download an installer package or whether you interface with it daily to manage code, learning more about it is elucidating and empowering.

  • EBCDIC Handling Library: A Ruby Project

    As long as we are going to be cooped up with the current pandemic, and to keep my sanity going, I decided to revive a software project that was the basis for my development of credit reporting software, the ASCII to EBCDIC translator.

    As long as I am going to revive this project, I may as well make a library of functions that handle data in EBCDIC with translations to and from ASCII. Of course, I would have to include UTF-8 and UTF-16 as these character codes did not exist back in the 1990s.

    [...]

    One thing that EBCDIC and ASCII have in common is that each character takes up exactly one byte of storage. But that is where the similarity ends.

    Standard ASCII is actually seven bits long and has numeric values ranging from 0 to 127 (or 0x00 to 0x7f in hexidecimal). So what happens to the eighth bit? Standard ASCII has no default action for characters containing the eighth bit (hexidecimal values of 0x80 to 0xFF.)

    In practice, however, the eighth bit is typically used for displaying character graphics, i.e. symbols that are typically used to create things like windows on a text display, or large sized logos. This character set can be found on 8-bit machines like the Commodore PET/VIC-20/64/128, the Atari 8-bit line of machines, and even the IBM-PC models 5150, 5160 and 5170 (commonly known as the IBM-PC, XT and AT)

More in Tux Machines

Linus Torvalds Now Uses AMD instead of Intel

Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git now uses AMD box as his main rig for work instead of an Intel one. During the Linux Kernel 5.7 rc7 announcement, Linus mentioned his primary machine. Read more

Working Remotely with FOSS tools

These last few months have been really wonderful in enabling me to catch up on making sure that as much of the technology that I use to be working online is indeed free and open source tools. Read more

Videos and Podcasts: UbuntuDDE Remix 20.04 LTS, LibreOffice 7 Alpha, Python Podcast and Late Night Linux

  • UbuntuDDE Remix 20.04 LTS overview | Powerful Ubuntu with the most beautiful desktop environment.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of UbuntuDDE Remix 20.04 LTS and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • LibreOffice 7 Alpha Early looks on Linux Mint 19.3 (installation guide and quick look)

    In this video, we are looking at LibreOffice 7 Alpha on Linux Mint 19.3, installation guide and quick look.

  • Python Podcast: Dependency Management Improvements In Pip's Resolver

    Dependency management in Python has taken a long and winding path, which has led to the current dominance of Pip. One of the remaining shortcomings is the lack of a robust mechanism for resolving the package and version constraints that are necessary to produce a working system. Thankfully, the Python Software Foundation has funded an effort to upgrade the dependency resolution algorithm and user experience of Pip. In this episode the engineers working on these improvements, Pradyun Gedam, Tzu-Ping Chung, and Paul Moore, discuss the history of Pip, the challenges of dependency management in Python, and the benefits that surrounding projects will gain from a more robust resolution algorithm. This is an exciting development for the Python ecosystem, so listen now and then provide feedback on how the new resolver is working for you.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 90

    The deeper implications of all of Microsoft’s recent announcements, good news for Munich, GNOME, and KDE, and mixed news for VR on Linux.

[Mageia] Chronicle in May

It’s been a very long time since you’ve heard from us on this blog. Now it’s time to give you some fresh news, because no matter what it seems, a lot of work has been done since then. Organization Many teams — the dev and QA teams in particular — are now working on a schedule for the upcoming Mageia 8. It is now available online. It seems this summer is going to be all about testing our new release! You can already take part in the testing and check if all of our Drak tools are functioning properly, and help the QA team. The coming months should allow us to report any new bugs or update existing reports in our Bugzilla. If you are comfortable working with Perl, your coding skills will be much appreciated to help correcting all the known bugs in our Drak tools. [...] A security alert has been published concerning our current version of LibreOffice, which is also EOL at the end of the month… Therefore, LibreOffice’s latest version 6.4.4 has been built and is currently being thoroughly tested. Read more