Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Eric S. Raymond: Goodbye Fedora, Hello Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

After thirteen years as a loyal Red Hat and Fedora user, I reached my
limit today, when an attempt to upgrade one (1) package pitched me
into a four-hour marathon of dependency chasing, at the end of which
an attempt to get around a trivial file conflict rendered my system
unusable.

The proximate causes of this failure were (1) incompetent repository
maintenance, making any nontrivial upgrade certain to founder on a
failed dependency, and (2) the fact that rpm is not statically linked
-- so it's possible to inadvertently remove a shared library it
depends on and be unrecoverably screwed. But the underlying problems
run much deeper.

Over the last five years, I've watched Red Hat/Fedora throw away what
was at one time a near-unassailable lead in technical prowess, market
share and community prestige. The blunders have been legion on both
technical and political levels.

More Here.

Re: Eric S. Raymond: Goodbye Fedora, Hello Ubuntu--bad link

More Here link is:
https://www.redhat.com/archives/fedora-devel-list/2007-February/msg01006.html
    ^
It should be:
http://www.redhat.com/archives/fedora-devel-list/2007-February/msg01006.html
   ^
Not a secure connection protocol -- remove the 's' from https:

In visiting the site of Eric's post and reading the comments, Eric's not getting much sympathy. Many point by point refutations/responses to his complaints.

re: bad link

Works here, but I removed the "s" in case some folks have trouble with it. thanks.

re2: bad link

Susan,
Right, I was at work, and there I'm behind a very restrictive proxy that won't pass many port/protocol variations, so the https original link didn't work for me.

And we care because?

Why do people feel the need to announce to the world that they're leaving one distro to another? (Let alone from one OS to another.)

I started with Fedora Core 3, then to OpenSUSE, after that to Ubuntu, and I've settled down to Arch Linux.

Not in a single instance, did I blog, posted on a mailinglist or in a forum how I'm no longer using a distro and my reasons of fustration for the change. I just did it without saying a word about it.

So while Eric Raymond is telling people how he's switching distros and venting his fustrations of the one he's leaving, what does that got to do with open-source in the overall scheme of things?

Does it benefit open-source in any way, shape, or form? Is it a major progressive leap into the desktop world for Linux, and further loosening the grip of Microsoft's domination? No. Its none of that. Its just one guy switching distros. That's it.

Question is: Why should we care of that?

Shouldn't we be more worried about improving open-source than these trivial things? We should be focusing on improvement and progress. (What can we do something better? And so on). Stuff like Nouveau, KVM, etc...Maybe coming up with better video editing software than we have now? What about trimming the bloatness of Firefox and OpenOffice? etc.

Maybe if we focus on things that actually matter, we'll be able to get somewhere.

Because ESR thinks you should

Read the Wikipedia entry about ESR to understand why he thinks everybody wants to know what he thinks. For example:

In 1997, Raymond became a prominent voice in the open source movement and was a co-founder of the Open Source Initiative. He also took on the self-appointed role of ambassador of open source to the press, business and public. ... His disagreement with Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation's views on the ethics of free software in favour of a more market-driven stance has exacerbated some pre-existing tensions in the community.

In a nutshell, there's a camp that strongly advocates having only open-source software in distributions; ESR is in another camp that strongly advocates including proprietary software in distributions, in order to make them more appealing (which is what he means by talking about Fedora's "failure to address the problem of proprietary multimedia formats" -- Fedora has addressed that "problem," just in a way Raymond disagrees with). It's an interesting debate.

But Raymond mainly thinks you care about what he says because he's got a rather large ego.

Some Guy Switches Linux Distributions!

Apparently some guy switched from one Linux distribution to another, throws a fit, and this is news.

Hey, I’ve tried lots of distributions in the past ten years. Does anyone remember Caldera?

Anyway, the important thing in that guy’s rant may be if he raised important issues that Fedora needs to consider.

Let’s see, apparently Fedora has failed to include proprietary media codecs. As Alan Cox says, however, “That would be because we believe in Free Software and doing the right thing…” In other words, distributing proprietary software is contrary to the goals of the project.

Full Post.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Distributions News: Ubuntu, Manjaro, and Lakka

  • Ubuntu founder retakes the CEO throne, many employees gone
    Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonincal has once again returned to his positition of CEO, as Jane Silber, the previous CEO now heads to the Board of Directors; and big changes happen to the staff lineup as a result. In a blog bost by Sibler, she says, “I originally agreed to be CEO for 5 years and we’ve extended my tenure as CEO by a couple of years already. We’ve been preparing for a transition for some time by strengthening the executive leadership team and maturing every aspect of the company, and earlier this year Mark and I decided that now is the time to effect this transition.”
  • [Video] Manjaro 17.0 KDE Edition - See What’s New
    Manjaro 17.0 KDE is the latest release of Manjaro Linux. This release brings new KDE Plasma 5.9.x as desktop environment include the most of KDE applications 16.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.32.
  • Make your own NES Classic Edition with Lakka 2.0 LibreELEC Linux distro and Raspberry Pi
    The NES Classic Edition is a very fun nostalgia-based gaming console. As someone who grew up with Nintendo, I knew I wanted the mini system as soon as it was announced. A family member was able to score me one on launch day, and I've been very happy with it. Unfortunately, other people have not been so lucky. Supply was very limited and it has since been discontinued. If you do not already have it, you are sort of out of luck without paying high prices on eBay or Craigslist. If you are only looking to replay the NES games of your youth, and you are OK with doing it in an unofficial way, emulation is another route. In fact, if you'd rather not play these games on your PC, you can instead use a Linux-based operating system and a Raspberry Pi (or other devices) hooked to a television. One such distro is Lakka, which just reached version 2.0. It is arguably better than an NES Classic Edition as it can also play games from other systems, such as SNES, Sega Genesis, Nintendo 64, PlayStation 1, and many more.

Software: Monitoring Tools, VSXu, and FSearch

today's howtos

Linux Mint's Plans

  • Some Of The Features Coming To Linux Mint's Cinnamon 3.4 Desktop
    In the latest monthly progress report on Linux Mint, some of the upcoming changes for the GNOME3-forked Cinnamon Desktop Environment were shared.
  • Monthly News – April 2017
    Many thanks to all the people who donated to us and who help to fund our project. Donations are down to about 60% of what they were last year, but they’re still quite high. In the first trimesters of 2015, 2016 and 2017 we respectively received $23k, $40k and $25k. Our development team has gotten bigger and our budget is being extended to include some administrators and designers. Other figures and metrics indicate we’re growing so this probably just reflects an exceptional year for donations in 2016.
  • Linux Mint Is Adopting LightDM as its Login Manager
    Linux Mint is adopting the LightDM display manager to handle and authenticate user sessions. Revealing plans in its latest monthly update, Mint says it will formally drop the MDM Display Manager (MDM) in favour of LightDM with Mint 18.2, release date for which is as-yet unknown. The popular Ubuntu-based Linux distribution mooted a possible switch earlier this year, noting that it had a key feature MDM lacks (guest sessions), and has become something of a standard across distributions.
  • Linux Mint 13 support ends, LMDE to get MATE 1.18 soon, big changes heading to Cinnamon
    The news from the Linux Mint team was quite interesting this week. First up, Linux Mint 13 has officially hit EOL (end of life), so you really do need to upgrade. LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) is set to get the MATE desktop version 1.18 "this week" and they have ported mintMenu over to GTK3, since the rest of MATE is now using GTK3 too it makes sense.