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More on Eye Candy: Awn on OpenSuse 10.2 (with Gnome/XGL)

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HowTos

I’ve had two pieces of eye candy on my mind lately - Beryl and Awn. Beryl has some cool features like making your close windows burn up in flames. Very cool looking. Well, I chose to try out Awn today. I installed it on my OpenSUSE 10.2 system which has admittedly ‘outdated’ hardware specs (1.6Ghz AMD Duron), but a decent graphics card (nVidia 5200) and is attached to a beautiful Samsung 941BW 19″ widescreen monitor. So if the eye candy works, it at least looks like a Vista Premium Wink.

Like I said, I’m using OpenSUSE 10.2 for this but for some reason could only find packages ready for FC6 or Ubuntu… odd. Anyway, there are two ways to install: 1) tarball and 2) svn. I used both b/c I followed version 1) and then decided I’d rather get the latest version from source to fix a couple bugs I found. I would recommend path 2) to anyone capable. Both paths are actually very simple if you already have XGL working.

Steps to setup on OpenSUSE 10.2:
1) Download tarball here
...

—— Subversion Method —–
Another option is to install from svn - this gets you the latest bits (which I recommend):

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installing opensuse 10.2 on lenovo thinkpad t60

Well, I finally got around to installing openSUSE 10.2 on my ThinkPad T60. In general, the installation process went very smoothely. The biggest advantages of openSUSE 10.2 over Fedora Core 6 during the installation process are:

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