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Kingfisher migrates to Red Hat Linux

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Linux

Kingfisher Group has migrated its 240 Castorama and Brico Dépôt stores on the continent to Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Oracle databases. The DIY retailer says Red Hat has enabled it to halve the number of servers it requires, and make a return on its investment in just eight months.

At the same time, it is benefiting from a tenfold increase in performance, the firm says.

"Overall, most of the open source distributions contained the features we needed, including infrastructure services," said Bernard Grulois, architecture and infrastructure manager at Kingfisher IT Services, the group's worldwide IT organisation. "But only Red Hat offered a business-ready Linux distribution with the level of service, guarantee and support that we required."

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The IT department for the Canadian province of Quebec is consolidating hundreds of Oracle databases -- spread across hundreds of midrange servers -- onto a new mainframe running Linux on top of z/VM.

With this consolidation, the government agency plans to recoup the cost of the new mainframe within three years and eventually save millions on hardware and software costs. But the move is being done for more than just financial reasons: It also allows them to have one platform for its Oracle databases, making it easier to manage their Oracle databases as they grow.

"On the midrange servers, there were some problems," said IT director Marc Plamondon. "We have about a 100-server increase per year on average, and we have many operating systems -- AIX, Solaris -- so it's a good thing to standardize on Linux, because it's going to be used more, not only on the z/VM platform, but everywhere."

Oracle shop ditches Unix for Linux on the mainframe


And:

Municipality of Makedonska Kamenica Migrates to OpenOffice.org

South African Government switches to Open Source

District to save money by switching computers to Linux

Anyone who has used more than one personal computer understands that a system seems to become obsolete sometime after the purchase but before it's first boot.

For a school district, this issue is compounded by the volume of computers it has to maintain. However, Dr. Anne Hyland, director of curriculum and instruction for Bexley City Schools, said the district is switching to a new operating system that will save the taxpayers a lot of money.

Hyland said Bexley will switch all of its computers over to Linux, an open-source operating system. Open source means that the code for the software is available for anyone to procure and manipulate, unlike Microsoft operating systems.

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