Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software: Office Suites, BleachBit and gti

Filed under
LibO
Software
OOo
  • List of Best Linux Office Suites

    Despite all the features, the freedom and the flexibility that Linux may offer you, it is not perfect. New Linux users face a lot of issues when they switch to Linux; such as not being able to use Microsoft Office, which is a popular productivity software!
    Now don’t panic just yet; there are two solutions to this problem. You can use a software called Wine that can enable you to install MS Office on your Linux. This solution is not preferred as not all version of MS Office are supported, leaving you with a very little choice.

    The second option is that you can use alternative MS Office suites that are available for Linux, which will be the topic of this article. Following is a list of the best Linux office suites.

  • FreeOffice on openSUSE

    I am not really much of an “Office Snob” but in recent weeks, I have heard people hammer and clammer about this FreeOffice for both “in favor of” and “against” it. In full disclosure, I mostly use LibreOffice and I still use Microsoft Office 2007 for certain very specific reasons. That said, I am obviously not an open source purest. Back to the reason for this write up, I use office products a lot for the purposes of creating product for home educating my kids as well as for many administrative things that I do as a part of my employment. For the most part, I don’t do anything terribly complex but I do like a certain uniformity and bits of information on things to keep me organized.

    Bottom Line Up Front, FreeOffice is a fine, well polished, very complete application. I am only using the “Free version” and I am very impressed with it. The user interface is flexible to your liking, looks clean and modern, most things work fantastically well and I am not sure how they get away with the look of the UIs similarity to Microsoft Office. Although this would likely serve all my needs, I will stick with LibreOffice because it is what I am most accustomed and I don’t gain anything by switching to FreeOffice. At a minimum, I would have to keep LibreOffice Draw for a few specific tasks.

  • BleachBit 4.0.0

    When your computer is getting full, BleachBit quickly frees disk space. When your information is only your business, BleachBit guards your privacy. With BleachBit you can free cache, delete cookies, clear Internet history, shred temporary files, delete logs, and discard junk you didn't know was there.

    Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source.

  • Linux Candy: gti – typo-based curio inspired by Steam Locomotive

    Linux Candy is a series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We only feature open-source software in this series.

    gti is intended to catch accidental typos of ‘gti’ instead of ‘git’. It displays an animation of a car driving by, and then launches git. Any parameters or arguments given to gti are passed through to git.

    gti is a tiny C program, written in a mere 329 lines of code. It’s just an inoffensive bit of fun that might raise a smile now and then, particularly important in these trying times.

BleachBit System Cleaner 4.0.0 Release Adds Support For Python 3

  • BleachBit System Cleaner 4.0.0 Release Adds Support For Python 3

    BleachBit 4.0.0 has been released, finally adding support for Python 3. The new version also adds a Discord cleaner, improves the Google Chrome, Firefox and Opera cleaners, brings packages for Fedora and openSUSE Tumbleweed, and more.

    BleachBit is a free and open source system cleaner with extra privacy options for shredding files and wiping free disk space. The application, which runs on Windows and Linux, can remove the web cache, cookies, URL history, temporary files and log files for web browsers like Firefox, Google Chrome / Chromium, Opera, Safari, etc., and remove the cache and temporary files for many commonly used applications.

    The tool can also be used to remove unused localization (language) files in order to free up disk space.

System Cleaner BleachBit 4.0.0 Released with Python 3 Port

BleachBit, the Open Source System Cleaner, Sees New Release

  • BleachBit, the Open Source System Cleaner, Sees New Release

    Feature wise the app adds the ability to clean up Discord files is added, and is now offers fastidious cleaning of Chrome, Firefox, VLC, and the open source podcast client gPodder.

    Package management tasks dnf autoremove and apt autoremove are now run automatically (depending on the distro) as part of the cleanup process (in case you forget to do it yourself).

    The app also fixes a few issues, including one that affected the pop-up notification shown when cleaning is done, and another affecting the responsiveness of the app window whilst cleaning was in progress.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Netbooks, Raspberry Pi and RISC-V

  • Netbooks: The Form Factor Time Forgot

    The first machine to kick off the craze was the Asus EEE PC 701, inspired by the One Laptop Per Child project. Packing a 700Mhz Celeron processor, a small 7″ LCD screen, and a 4 GB SSD, it was available with Linux or Windows XP installed from the factory. With this model, Asus seemed to find a market that Toshiba never quite hit with their Libretto machines a decade earlier. The advent of the wireless network and an ever-more exciting Internet suddenly made a tiny, toteable laptop attractive, whereas previously it would have just been a painful machine to do work on. The name “netbook” was no accident, highlighting the popular use case — a lightweight, portable machine that’s perfect for web browsing and casual tasks. But the netbook was more than the sum of its parts. Battery life was in excess of 3 hours, and the CPU was a full-fat x86 processor. This wasn’t a machine that required users to run special cut-down software or compromise on usage. Anything you could run on an average, low-spec PC, you could run on this, too. USB and VGA out were available, along with WiFi, so presentations were easy and getting files on and off was a cinch. It bears remembering, too, that back in the Windows XP days, it was easy to share files across a network without clicking through 7 different permissions tabs and typing in your password 19 times.

  • Raspberry Pi–powered robot farmers
  • Efinix Releases Three RISC-V Software-Defined SoC’s Optimized for Trion FPGA’s

    Efinix has announced three RISC-V Software-defined SoC’s based on Charles Papon’s VexRiscv core and optimized for the company’s Trion T8 to T120 FPGA’s. VexRiscv is a 32-bit RISC-V CPU using RISCV32I ISA with M and C extensions, has five pipeline stages (fetch, decode, execute, memory, and writeback), and a configurable feature set. Each SoC includes a RISC-V core, memory, as well as various I/O and interfaces.

Programming Leftovers

  • Secure Socket API - a simple and powerful approach for TLS support in software

    As a member of the Norwegian Unix User Group, I have the pleasure of receiving the USENIX magazine ;login: several times a year. I rarely have time to read all the articles, but try to at least skim through them all as there is a lot of nice knowledge passed on there. I even carry the latest issue with me most of the time to try to get through all the articles when I have a few spare minutes. The other day I came across a nice article titled "The Secure Socket API: TLS as an Operating System Service" with a marvellous idea I hope can make it all the way into the POSIX standard. The idea is as simple as it is powerful. By introducing a new socket() option IPPROTO_TLS to use TLS, and a system wide service to handle setting up TLS connections, one both make it trivial to add TLS support to any program currently using the POSIX socket API, and gain system wide control over certificates, TLS versions and encryption systems used.

  • Choosing YAML for a Configuration File

    Recently I have been working to clean up the configuration file syntax and parsing in rpminspect. Several months back there were suggestions on fedora-devel to improve things with the configuration files. The ideas were good improvements, so I added them to my to do list and am now at a point where I can work on making those changes.

  • Apps get bit animated: Android Studio 4.0 released with new Motion Editor

    Google has released Android Studio 4.0, a massive update to its IDE for mobile app development, with features like an upgraded Layout Inspector, and the brand new Build Analyzer and motion editor. Android Studio is based on JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA, a popular Java IDE, and version 4.0 uses IDEA 2019.3.3, according to the release notes, which came out in February 2020. The Android Studio incarnation is a little behind IDEA, for which version 2020 is out.

  • Talk Python to Me: #267 15 amazing pytest plugins

    Do you write tests for your code? You probably should. And most of the time, pytest is the industry standard these days. But pytest can be much more than what you get from just installing it as a tool. There are many amazing plugins that improve pytest in many aspects. That's why I invited Brian Okken to the show to tell us about his favorites. Listen in and your Python testing will be faster, stronger, and more beautiful!

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxi) stackoverflow python report
  • How and why I built ClassUp

    I am an Architect & Developer & I love to code! Lived & worked in many countries I have seen systems evolved from traditional client server to today's modern Cloud based Apps. Now a days I code in Python/Django, Vue.js to develop Web, Android and iOS apps

Nostalgia struck! Aquaris E4.5 & Ubuntu Touch again

I'm happy with my little experiment, even if it serves no higher purpose. Now, on my M10 tablet, I won't repeat the exercise. It's a fairly capable device, and there, Android 6 does a pretty good job - a marked improvement over Android 5 that was on Aquaris E4.5. Indeed, Android has significantly improved over time. But on the phone, OTA-12 works quite well, and offers a fast if limited experience. But for novelty sake, I'm going to take this as far as it goes, either the UBports project or the lifespan of the device. The community-supported continuation of the Ubuntu Phone effort - UBports Ubuntu Touch - is a commendable project. Given its resources, it manages to deliver a fairly robust and fun product, with OTA-12 as its latest incarnation. Solid, usable - to an extent, but also secure, updated and with solid privacy. If you need a basic smartphone, this is a solution that offers a reasonable compromise. I've never really expected to be using Ubuntu Touch again, but now I'm glad I did this, if only to see how far one's passion can stretch. But on a serious, emotionless note, really, if you don't need much, if you're not hooked into social media, and if your hardware supports the OTA-12 image, you might want to give this a try. If anything, it's more mature than it ever was, and in the privacy-focused world, it makes perfect sense. Read more

Sparky 2020.06

The June snapshot of Sparky 2020.06 of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the Debian testing “Bullseye”. Changes: • system upgrade from Debian testing repos as of June 5, 2020 • Linux kernel 5.6.14 (5.7.0 in Sparky unstable repos) • Firefox 77.0 • Thunderbird 68.8.1 • LibreOffice 6.4.4.2 • debi-tool’ replaced by ‘gdebi’ • added ‘spterm’ (Sparky Terminal) to be used by Sparky tools • Otter Browser replaced by Epiphany Browser (MinimalGUI) • added RadioStation – a fork of RadioTray-Lite (and Radiotray) • added Openbox Noir to the desktop list to be installed as a choice (via MinimalGUI & MinimalCLI and APTus too) • added disk autopartitioning, encrypting and lvm support to the Advanced Installer DEV (still experimental) • Calamares updated up to 3.2.24; changed password strength to a minimum number of digits as possible in Calamares, as requested a few times by our users (can be used used 1 digit, but I recommend to use strong password); thanks to lami07 • added lxappearance to MinimalGUI iso (Openbox) Read more