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Coming soon: Fedora on Lenovo laptops!

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Red Hat

Today, I’m excited to share some big news with you—Fedora Workstation will be available on Lenovo ThinkPad laptops! Yes, I know, many of us already run a Fedora operating system on a Lenovo system, but this is different. You’ll soon be able to get Fedora pre-installed by selecting it as you customize your purchase. This is a pilot of Lenovo’s Linux Community Series – Fedora Edition, beginning with ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8 laptops, possibly expanding to other models in the future.

The Lenovo team has been working with folks at Red Hat who work on Fedora desktop technologies to make sure that the upcoming Fedora 32 Workstation is ready to go on their laptops. The best part about this is that we’re not bending our rules for them. Lenovo is following our existing trademark guidelines and respects our open source principles. That’s right—these laptops ship with software exclusively from the official Fedora repos! When they ship, you’ll see Fedora 32 Workstation. (Models which can benefit from the NVIDIA binary driver can install it in the normal way after the fact, by opting in to proprietary software sources.)

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Lenovo to begin selling some ThinkPad laptops with Fedora Linux

Lenovo To Begin Shipping ThinkPad Laptops With Fedora

  • Lenovo To Begin Shipping ThinkPad Laptops With Fedora Pre-Installed

    When it comes to finding laptops with Linux pre-loaded by the OEM, it's mostly Ubuntu or its derivatives found most often on these devices. But Lenovo and Red Hat are announcing today that Fedora Workstation 32 will begin appearing soon on select ThinkPad laptops.

    Fedora will be offered as a pre-install option with a new "Fedora Edition" of the ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen 8 laptops. Other models with Fedora are expected in the future.

Lenovo are to start shipping Fedora Linux as an option

  • Lenovo are to start shipping Fedora Linux as an option on their ThinkPad laptops

    As a nice win for open source, hardware vendor Lenovo are going to begin offering Fedora Linux on their ThinkPad line. This was announced today over on the Fedora Magazine by Red Hat's Matthew Miller.

    You will be able to select Fedora Workstation as your operating system when customizing a Lenovo ThinkPad, as part of a pilot in Lenovo’s Linux Community Series. They're going to be starting with the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8 laptops and if it's a success likely more. Sounds like it's been a good partnership too, as Miller said Lenovo has been "following our existing trademark guidelines and respects our open source principles" with it shipping exactly as the Fedora team want.

In LWN

A bold new chapter for Fedora Workstation

  • A bold new chapter for Fedora Workstation

    So you have probably seen the announcement that Lenovo are launching a set of Fedora Workstation based laptops. I am so happy and proud of this effort as it comes as the culmination of our hard effort over the last 6 years to drain the swamp and make Linux a more viable desktop operating system.
    I am also so happy and proud that Lenovo was willing to work with us on this effort as they provide us with an incredible opportunity to reach both new and old Linux users around the globe with these systems, being the worlds biggest laptop maker with the widest global reach. Because one important aspect of this is that Lenovo will provide these laptops through all their sales channels in all their markets. This means you can of course order them online through their website, but it also means companies can order them through Lenovos business to business channels and it means that in any country where Lenovo is present you can order them, so this is not a North America only or Europe only, this is truly a global offering.

    There are a lot of people who has been involved here in helping to make this happen, but special thanks goes to Egbert Gracias from Lenovo who was critical in making this happen and also a special thanks to Alberto Ruiz who spearheaded this effort from our side.

    Our engineering team here at Red Hat has also been hard at work ensuring we can support these models very well be that by bugfixes to kernel drivers or by polishing up things like the Linux fingerprint support. As we go forward we hope to build on this relationship to take linux laptops to the next level and I am also very happy to say that we got Jared Dominguez on on team now to help us develop better work practices and closer relationships with our hardware partners and original device manufacturers.

Fedora Linux Will Soon Be Available on Select Lenovo Laptops

  • Fedora Linux Will Soon Be Available on Select Lenovo Laptops

    The Fedora Project and Lenovo are partnering to offer customers the option to buy a ThinkPad laptop with the Fedora Linux distribution pre-installed.

    After many trials and tribulations, Lenovo is finally becoming a part of the Open Source and GNU/Linux ecosystem. More specifically, they are patterning with the Fedora Project to offer laptops with Fedora Linux pre-installed.

    Fedora Project leader Matthew Miller announced the exciting news earlier today, saying that users will soon be able to purchase a ThinkPad laptop from Lenovo that comes pre-installed with the Fedora Workstation distro, which features the popular GNOME desktop environment.

    For starters, the only Lenovo laptops that will be available with Fedora Linux are the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8. But Matthew Miller is hopeful that Lenovo will give users the option to buy other models in the future.

Bogdan Popa With His Usual Nonsense

  • Windows PC Maker Lenovo to Launch Linux Laptops [Ed: Microsoft propagandist "Bogdan Popa, Microsoft News Editor" (Microsoft PR/spin/FUD for over a decade) pretends that Lenovo is "Windows PC Maker" (which is false and a rather misleading term Microsoft looks to advance)]

    Lenovo will follow in the footsteps of Dell and launch a series of Linux laptops as part of an experiment which could then be expanded to further models should everything go according to the plan.

Lenovo ThinkPad Laptops Coming Soon With Pre-installed Fedora

  • Lenovo ThinkPad Laptops Coming Soon With Pre-installed Fedora Linux

    Is Fedora Linux your daily driver? Well, then here’s the big news for all Fedora lovers. The folks at Red Hat who work on Fedora desktop have joined hands with the Lenovo team to bring Thinkpad laptops with Fedora Workstation pre-installed.

    You may think that I’m already running Fedora OS on my Lenovo system, so what’s all the fuss about?. But as mentioned by Matthew Miller, Fedora’s project leader, in his latest blog pre-loaded Fedora on ThinkPad is quite a different experience. Plus, Lenovo will fix several issues that you face while running Fedora Linux on Lenovo laptops.

Lenovo and Fedora Project confirm partnership for Fedora

  • Lenovo and Fedora Project confirm partnership for Fedora versions of the ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, ThinkPad P53 and ThinkPad X1 Gen 8

    Lenovo is to start selling Fedora versions of ThinkPads. Announced via the Fedora magazine, Lenovo has agreed to begin selling Fedora editions of the ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, P53 and X1 Gen 8. Part of Lenovo's Linux Community Series, the three machines will come pre-loaded with Fedora 32 Workstation.

    According to Matthew Miller, the machines running Fedora 32 will only come pre-loaded with official Fedora repositories. Practically speaking, this means the P1 Gen 2 and P53 will not have NVIDIA drivers installed by default. Naturally, these can be enabled by downloading software from proprietary sources.

    Miller notes that the ThinkPad Fedora editions will be available globally. Seen as a pilot program, Lenovo may expand its Fedora offering if uptake is strong. There is no word on availability or pricing yet, though.

Lenovo announces Fedora-based ThinkPad series

  • Lenovo announces Fedora-based ThinkPad series

    There’s good news for everyone who’s a fan of both Red Hat’s Fedora OS and Lenovo Thinkpads in that these companies have decided to collaborate and release Fedora-based Thinkpad laptops shortly.

    Before we further discuss this news, it makes sense to highlight all the advantages that come with the Fedora operating system. Powered by Linux, this Fedora Workstation used the GNOME desktop environment in its purest form and is primarily aimed at software developers. Thus, they will find it useful when dealing with hardware, clouds, and containers.

    Not only that, but Fedora also comes with a bunch of pre-installed open-source software that you’re going to be using a lot. Heck, even the creator of Linux himself, Linus Torvalds, uses this operating system, so why shouldn’t you?

Lenovo is Bringing Fedora Linux to its ThinkPad Laptops

  • Lenovo is Bringing Fedora Linux to its ThinkPad Laptops

    We’re talking pre-installed operating system here, available across a fleet of the computer maker’s popular developer models including the ThinkPad P1, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 (Gen 8) laptops.

    To accompany the news there’s this cute little promo video...

Lenovo is joining Dell in the “OEM Linux Laptop” club

  • Lenovo is joining Dell in the “OEM Linux Laptop” club

    I'm happy to see that Lenovo is taking this step to offer pre-installed Linux support. Although I personally am a die-hard Ubuntu user, it's also nice to see that Lenovo went with a different distro—while many in our community bemoan "fragmentation," I personally believe that diversity is one of the Linux community's greatest strengths.

    Lenovo has committed to making the pre-installed experience functional only using software from the main Fedora repositories—no third-party repos will be necessary, and by default no proprietary drivers will be installed. Even if Fedora isn't your personal distro of choice, an OEM Fedora Workstation Thinkpad will almost certainly be an excellent choice for most distros you might choose to replace it with.

    Unfortunately, the upcoming Yoga Slim 7—powered with a Ryzen 7 4800U or Ryzen 5 4600U Zen laptop CPU—isn't on Lenovo's initial list of supported models. I'm still itching to get my hands on one for review—the dual-GPU Zephyrus G14 didn't fare too well with Ubuntu, but I'm still hopeful that the more simply designed Slim 7 will do better.

Lenovo will start offering ThinkPads with Linux pre-installed

  • Lenovo will start offering ThinkPads with Linux pre-installed

    The world's biggest PC company in terms of shipments has decided to offer a few select models with Linux pre-installed. In doing so, it joins the existing club that includes Dell and other smaller players like Purism, ZaReason, and System76.

    If Linux has a special place in your heart, you will want to know Lenovo is partnering with the Fedora Project to give you your dream machine in the form of ThinkPad laptops that make it easy even for a newcomer to get started with Fedora.

Fedora 32 released with Lenovo support

  • Fedora 32 released with Lenovo support

    Fedora isn't a Linux for everyone. But, for developers who want the most from their Linux desktop, you can't beat it. This latest edition, like its predecessors, brings together the best and latest open-source programs for programmers. As Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller said: "No matter what variant of Fedora you use, you're getting the latest the open-source world has to offer."

    Fedora, which is Red Hat's community Linux distribution, also acts as a crystal ball to see where Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is going. While most of the attention for a new Fedora release is on the desktop, Fedora 32's far more than just a workstation distribution. There's also Fedora Server, Fedora IoT, and the new Fedora CoreOS for containerized workloads.

    For most people still, a new Fedora is all about the desktop. So, let's take a look at Fedora Workstation.

    This new Fedora uses the Linux Kernel 5.6. It also includes WireGuard virtual private network (VPN) support and USB4 support.

    The workstation uses the new GNOME 3.36 for its default desktop. This GNOME release is faster and comes with a variety of improvements. These include a cleaner interface with better font control. One welcomed change is that, when you enter a password, you can now toggle it so you can see what your password is as you enter it rather than an uninformative link of asterisks. I find this very helpful, and I'm glad to see it's finally in GNOME.

In Slashdot now with many comments

Lenovo to offer ThinkPads with Linux installed

  • Lenovo to offer ThinkPads with Linux installed

    Are you a lover of Linux? Then prepare to swoon because Lenovo is partnering with the Fedora Project to pre-install Linux on a select number of its machines. This pilot program, known as Linux Community Series - Fedora Edition, will include the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad X1 Gen8, and the ThinkPad P53.

    While many already run a Fedora operating system on a Lenovo system, this move means that the aforementioned devices will come with the newly released Fedora 32 Workstation Linux pre-installed. For users with other devices in mind, Lenovo could expand its selection of Linux-equipped devices if demand supports it.

    Per Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller, “The Lenovo team has been working with folks at Red Hat who work on Fedora desktop technologies to make sure that the upcoming Fedora 32 Workstation is ready to go on their laptops. The best part about this is that we’re not bending our rules for them. Lenovo is following our existing trademark guidelines and respects our open source principles. That’s right—these laptops ship with software exclusively from the official Fedora repos!”

Linux laptops: Lenovo is going to sell these ThinkPads

  • Linux laptops: Lenovo is going to sell these ThinkPads with Fedora preinstalled

    Rejoice Linux fans: Lenovo will start offering select models of its ThinkPad series pre-installed with the Linux-based Fedora Workstation distribution, joining the ranks of Dell in the lineup of mainstream Linux laptop suppliers.

    Lenovo will offer Fedora 32 Workstation as a customizable option for its ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53 and ThinkPad X1 Gen8 options, under a pilot of Lenovo's Linux Community Series – Fedora Edition.

Lenovo to offer Linux laptops

  • Lenovo to offer Linux laptops

    Lenovo has announced a partnership with FedoraProject to offer developer-friendly ThinkPad series laptops that will run on the newly released Fedora 32 Workstation Linux out of the box.

    The Linux Community Series program will kick off with devices including ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad X1 Gen8, and the ThinkPad P53 laptops.

    The company aims to expand the selection of devices to other models soon based on demand.

Lenovo is Jumping on the Linux Laptop Bandwagon

  • Lenovo is Jumping on the Linux Laptop Bandwagon

    PC and laptop maker Lenovo is set to release ThinkPad laptops, pre-installed with Fedora Linux.

    One issue Linux has faced over the years is there was never enough off-the-shelf hardware that included the open source operating system. Things started to change when System76 came into existence. Since then a number of hardware makers have jumped onto the bandwagon.

    You can now count Lenovo among those numbers. In his latest blog, Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader, announced, “Fedora Workstation will be available on Lenovo ThinkPad laptops!” Miller continues, “Yes, I know, many of us already run a Fedora operating system on a Lenovo system, but this is different. You’ll soon be able to get Fedora pre-installed by selecting it as you customize your purchase.”

Lenovo is certifying its entire workstation portfolio for Linux

  • Lenovo is certifying its entire workstation portfolio for Linux

    Lenovo says that more than 250 million computers are sold each year, and 2.87% of those, roughly 7.2 million machines, are running Linux. Lenovo says that Linux used to be thought of as a niche operating system for IT users, but it is increasingly being used by data scientists, developers, application engineers, scientists, and other users. With Linux use growing, Lenovo is working to certify its entire workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from Ubuntu and Red Hat.

    [...]

    Historically Lenovo certified only certain products within a limited subset of hardware configurations to work with Linux. The new move will see the entire portfolio of ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations certified for both Red Hat Linux and Ubuntu LTS. The latter is a long-term enterprise-stability version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution.

    Lenovo says that its workstations will work intuitively with the host Linux OS and offer full end-to-end support. That support includes security patches and updates to better secure and verify hardware drivers, and firmware and BIOS optimizations. Lenovo also plans to upstream device drivers directly to the Linux kernel to help maintain stability and compatibility through the life workstation. It's unclear when the certification of the workstations will be complete. Lenovo does have a Red Hat Fedora pilot program with a preloaded Fedora image on the ThinkPad P53 and P1 Gen 2 computers. Not long ago Lenovo unveiled a new Chromebook S340 notebook as another alternative to Windows.

Lenovo upgrades ThinkPad lineup with Intel, X1 Extreme Gen 3

  • Lenovo upgrades ThinkPad lineup with Intel, X1 Extreme Gen 3 starts at $1,749

    Lenovo just refreshed to its mobile workstation lineup, which includes the ThinkPad X1 Extreme Gen 3 laptop and the company’s ThinkPad P series. In total, five ThinkPad mobile workstation models are getting the upgrade to the latest Intel 10th-generation processors and Nvidia graphics, and you’ll be able to pick one up next month in July when they become available.

    If you value a balance between productivity and mobility, the ThinkPad X1 Extreme will be the model you’ll want. Boasting a similar silhouette from the iconic ThinkPad X1 Carbon series, the third-generation Extreme model comes with a slightly larger 15.6-inch display in various configurations ranging from a standard FHD panel to a 4K OLED touchscreen model that supports HDR 500 True Black. And at just 0.72-inches thick, the 3.75-pound Extreme looks more like a standard Ultrabook than a workstation, but don’t let that fool you.

Lenovo's New ThinkPad P1 Gen3 for Professionals:

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Moving (parts of) the Cling REPL in Clang

Motivation
===

Over the last decade we have developed an interactive, interpretative 
C++ (aka REPL) as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) data analysis 
project -- ROOT [1-2]. We invested a significant  effort to replace the 
CINT C++ interpreter with a newly implemented REPL based on llvm -- 
cling [3]. The cling infrastructure is a core component of the data 
analysis framework of ROOT and runs in production for approximately 5 
years.

Cling is also  a standalone tool, which has a growing community outside 
of our field. Cling’s user community includes users in finance, biology 
and in a few companies with proprietary software. For example, there is 
a xeus-cling jupyter kernel [4]. One of the major challenges we face to 
foster that community is  our cling-related patches in llvm and clang 
forks. The benefits of using the LLVM community standards for code 
reviews, release cycles and integration has been mentioned a number of 
times by our "external" users.

Last year we were awarded an NSF grant to improve cling's sustainability 
and make it a standalone tool. We thank the LLVM Foundation Board for 
supporting us with a non-binding letter of collaboration which was 
essential for getting this grant.


Background
===

Cling is a C++ interpreter built on top of clang and llvm. In a 
nutshell, it uses clang's incremental compilation facilities to process 
code chunk-by-chunk by assuming an ever-growing translation unit [5]. 
Then code is lowered into llvm IR and run by the llvm jit. Cling has 
implemented some language "extensions" such as execution statements on 
the global scope and error recovery. Cling is in the core of HEP -- it 
is heavily used during data analysis of exabytes of particle physics 
data coming from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other particle 
physics experiments.


Plans
===

The project foresees three main directions -- move parts of cling 
upstream along with the clang and llvm features that enable them; extend 
and generalize the language interoperability layer around cling; and 
extend and generalize the OpenCL/CUDA support in cling. We are at the 
early stages of the project and this email intends to be an RFC for the 
first part -- upstreaming parts of cling. Please do share your thoughts 
on the rest, too.


Moving Parts of Cling Upstream
---

Over the years we have slowly moved some patches upstream. However we 
still have around 100 patches in the clang fork. Most of them are in the 
context of extending the incremental compilation support for clang. The 
incremental compilation poses some challenges in the clang 
infrastructure. For example, we need to tune CodeGen to work with 
multiple llvm::Module instances, and finalize per each 
end-of-translation unit (we have multiple of them). Other changes 
include small adjustments in the FileManager's caching mechanism, and 
bug fixes in the SourceManager (code which can be reached mostly from 
within our setup). One conclusion we can draw from our research is that 
the clang infrastructure fits amazingly well to something which was not 
its main use case. The grand total of our diffs against clang-9 is: `62 
files changed, 1294 insertions(+), 231 deletions(-)`. Cling is currently 
being upgraded from llvm-5 to llvm-9.

A major weakness of cling's infrastructure is that it does not work with 
the clang Action infrastructure due to the lack of an 
IncrementalAction.  A possible way forward would be to implement a 
clang::IncrementalAction as a starting point. This way we should be able 
to reduce the amount of setup necessary to use the incremental 
infrastructure in clang. However, this will be a bit of a testing 
challenge -- cling lives downstream and some of the new code may be 
impossible to pick straight away and use. Building a mainline example 
tool such as clang-repl which gives us a way to test that incremental 
case or repurpose the already existing clang-interpreter may  be able to 
address the issue. The major risk of the task is avoiding code in the 
clang mainline which is untested by its HEP production environment.
There are several other types of patches to the ROOT fork of Clang, 
including ones  in the context of performance,towards  C++ modules 
support (D41416), and storage (does not have a patch yet but has an open 
projects entry and somebody working on it). These patches can be 
considered in parallel independently on the rest.

Extend and Generalize the Language Interoperability Layer Around Cling
---

HEP has extensive experience with on-demand python interoperability 
using cppyy[6], which is built around the type information provided by 
cling. Unlike tools with custom parsers such as swig and sip and tools 
built on top of C-APIs such as boost.python and pybind11, cling can 
provide information about memory management patterns (eg refcounting) 
and instantiate templates on the fly.We feel that functionality may not 
be of general interest to the llvm community but we will prepare another 
RFC and send it here later on to gather feedback.


Extend and Generalize the OpenCL/CUDA Support in Cling
---

Cling can incrementally compile CUDA code [7-8] allowing easier set up 
and enabling some interesting use cases. There are a number of planned 
improvements including talking to HIP [9] and SYCL to support more 
hardware architectures.



The primary focus of our work is to upstreaming functionality required 
to build an incremental compiler and rework cling build against vanilla 
clang and llvm. The last two points are to give the scope of the work 
which we will be doing the next 2-3 years. We will send here RFCs for 
both of them to trigger technical discussion if there is interest in 
pursuing this direction.


Collaboration
===

Open source development nowadays relies on reviewers. LLVM is no 
different and we will probably disturb a good number of people in the 
community ;)We would like to invite anybody interested in joining our 
incremental C++ activities to our open every second week calls. 
Announcements will be done via google group: compiler-research-announce 
(https://groups.google.com/g/compiler-research-announce).



Many thanks!


David & Vassil

Read more Also: Cling C++ Interpreter Looking To Upstream More Code Into LLVM

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