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Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Is Slated for Release on October 22

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Ubuntu

In the past, codenaming of new Ubuntu releases was done by Mark Shuttleworth, but these days it looks like it’s decided by the entire team. And the codename of Ubuntu 20.10 will be “Groovy Gorilla.”

A draft release schedule was published as well, suggesting that the development will start at the end of April with the toolchain update. But, as with all past releases, development will be based on the current stable release, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

The Ubuntu 20.10 development cycle will continue the tradition of providing optional Ubuntu Testing Weeks to members of the community who want to help shape the upcoming release.

Two Ubuntu Testing Week events are planned, one during the week of July 2nd and the other one during the week of September 3rd.

Read more

Also: The Ubuntu 20.10 Codename Is Revealed, And It’s Pretty Groovy, Baby

Ubuntu 20.10 Might Be The "Groovy Gorilla"

Groovy Gorilla Release Notes

Ubuntu 20.10 Codename Revealed by Canonical!!

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Codename Revealed by Canonical!!

    Ubuntu 20.10 Codename Revealed: The month of April 2020 is full of surprises. It is not less a day since the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS codenamed Focal Fossa was released, the codename of Ubuntu 20.10 has been revealed today. Following the lineup E(Eoan Ermine), and F(Focal Fossa), Ubuntu 20.10 gets the following codename.

Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Release Date Announced

  • Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Release Date Announced

    Ubuntu 20.04 LTS was officially launched this week as one of the most-anticipated updates in a long time, and now Canonical is working on the next important release due later this year.

    Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla will thus be the next major Ubuntu update after 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa), 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), and 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Release Schedule

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Release Schedule

    Insight: Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Release Schedule

    Right after the official release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa on April 23, 2020, the Canonical company behind Ubuntu is gearing up Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla. Ubuntu 20.10 will be available on 22 October 2020.

Ubuntu 20.10 Daily Builds Now Available to Download

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Daily Builds Now Available to Download

    Buckle up for the ride as you can now download Ubuntu 20.10 daily builds for testing!

    Freshly spun ISOs of what will become the next stable Ubuntu release will be produced each and every day (well, almost) from now until the stable release of Ubuntu 20.10 in October.

    Both “pending” and “current” ISO images are available from the Ubuntu CD image server, with the latter set having passed a series of automated tests.

    This is an important milestone in the development cycle though, as of April 30, there’s not exactly “new” in the daily builds to see.

Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Daily Builds Now Available

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Daily Builds Now Available For Download

    Right after the release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa on April 23, 2020, the Canonical company behind Ubuntu is working on Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla. Ubuntu 20.10 will be available on 22 October 2020.

    Meanwhile, If you want to try the daily builds of Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla then it is available for the download.

    As Ubuntu 20.10 daily builds are not the final, do not install it in your regular system or don’t use it for you day to day work. It might crash or not be stable enough to perform various tasks.

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