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Fedora 32 is officially here!

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Red Hat

It’s here! We’re proud to announce the release of Fedora 32. Thanks to the hard work of thousands of Fedora community members and contributors, we’re celebrating yet another on-time release.

If you just want to get to the bits without delay, head over to https://getfedora.org/ right now. For details, read on!

Read more

Also: Fedora 32 Computational Neuroscience ready-to-install ISO image is now available!

What’s new in Fedora 32 Workstation

Fedora 32 Officially Released with Linux Kernel 5.6, Available for Download Now

Fedora 32 Officially Released With EarlyOOM, SSD TRIM Finally Flipped On, GNOME 3.36

Fedora 32 released

Fedora 32 Linux-based operating system available for download

  • Fedora 32 Linux-based operating system available for download with GNOME 3.36

    The Fedora operating system may be named after a hat, but I consider it more similar to an old, worn-in, pair of sneakers. It may not be the trendiest or flashiest Linux distro, but it is comfortable as hell. Sure, Manjaro and MX Linux may be what the "cool kids" are using these days, but Fedora remains the reliable Linux distribution that is always there for you -- fast, stable, and focused on open source. An old comfortable shoe.

    Today, Fedora 32 becomes available for download. It comes with GNOME 3.36 which you can read more about here. If you don't like GNOME, it isn't the end of the world -- you can instead choose KDE Plasma, Cinnamon, MATE, and more. There is even a special ARM variant of Fedora 32 that will work with Raspberry Pi devices.

Upgrading Fedora 31 to Fedora 32

  • Upgrading Fedora 31 to Fedora 32

    Fedora 32 is available now. You’ll likely want to upgrade your system to get the latest features available in Fedora. Fedora Workstation has a graphical upgrade method. Alternatively, Fedora offers a command-line method for upgrading Fedora 30 to Fedora 31.

    Before upgrading, visit the wiki page of common Fedora 32 bugs to see if there’s an issue that might affect your upgrade. Although the Fedora community tries to ensure upgrades work well, there’s no way to guarantee this for every combination of hardware and software that users might have.

More on Fedora Release

  • Fedora 32 Computational Neuroscience ready-to-install ISO image is now available!

    Fedora 32 was released today after a full six months of development. There are a lot of improvements and new changes included in this release. You can read the announcement here and the complete release notes here.

    This release is particularly exciting for the NeuroFedora team. It also marks the first release of our first deliverable: the CompNeuro Lab ISO image! The aim of developing such ready to install ISO images that are packed with the necessary tools is to enable users to quickly set up their computers and get down to work, instead of wasting precious time and effort on installing tools individually by hand. While we hope that this will enable researchers by providing them easy access to Free/Open Source research tools, we also hope that the platform will serve as a teaching aid in Computational Neuroscience courses.

  • Fedora Workstation : Swamp draining for 6 years

    As Fedora Workstation 32 was released today I ended up looking back at our efforts to drain the swamp over the last 6 years. In April of 2014 I wrote a blog post outlining our vision for the Fedora Workstation effort and what we wanted to achieve with it. I hadn’t looked at that blog post in years, but it was interesting going back to it and realize that while some of the details have changed it is still the vision we are pursuing today; to keep draining the swamp and make Fedora Workstation a top notch operating system for developers and makers in general. Which I guess is one of the hallmarks of a decent vision, that it allows for the details to change without invalidating it.

    One of my pet peeves at the time with Linux as a desktop operating system was that so many of the so called efforts to make linux user friendly was essentially duck taping over the problems, creating fragile solutions that often made it harder for us to really move forward. In the yers since we addressed a lot of major swamp issues with our efforts around HiDPI & Bolt (getting ahead of hardware enablement for new monitors and Thunderbolt devices respectively), Flatpaks, GNOME Software and AppStream (making applications discoverable, deployable and maintainable), Wayland (making your desktop secure and future proof), LVFS and firmware handling (making them easily available for Linux users), Finger print reader standard (ensuring your hardware is fully supported) and coming up with ways to improve the lives of developers with improvements to the terminal or Fedora Toolbox, our developer pet container tool.

    Working on these and other issues we early realized that a model where hardware gets enabled in a reactive manner, in response to new laptops being sold, was never going to yield a good result for our users. As long as we followed that model people where bound to always hit issues with laptops as they came out and then have to deal with those issues for the first 6-12 Months of its life. This is why I am so excited about our new partnership with Lenovo that we pre-announced on Friday as it is both the culmination of our efforts over the last 6 years, but also the starting point of a new era in terms of how we work with hardware makers. So instead of us spending a ton of time trying to reverse engineers basic drivers we can now rely on our hardware partner and their component vendors providing that and we can instead focus on what I call high level hardware enablement. Meaning that as we see new features coming into laptops and computers we can try to improve the infrastructure in the operating system to be able to take full advantage of said hardware, and we can do so in collaboration with the hardware makers knowing that once we provide the infrastructure they will ensure to provide drivers and similar fitting into that infrastructure. Our work on fingerprint readers and thunderbolt support for instance has been two great early examples of that.

  • Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution Fedora 32 released

    The Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution, Fedora, has a brand new release today with Fedora 32 showing off some of the latest of what open source has to offer. Fedora 32 comes shortly after they announced a teaming up with Lenovo to provide Fedora on some ThinkPad laptops.

    Much like the recent Ubuntu 20.04 release it includes a ton of major packaging upgrades, such as the recent GNOME 3.36 desktop which is in their main Fedora Workstation edition. This includes all the goodies like a new lock screen, an easy to use desktop Extensions application, a better notification system, a do not disturb mode and more UI revamps. You can get other desktop environments too with their various "Spins" like KDE with Plasma, Xfce and more.

  • Fedora 32 is Now Available to Download, This is What’s New

    The final stable release of Fedora 32 is now available for download, packing in six months worth of development.

    Now, I know what you’re thinking: this is supposed to be a blog about Ubuntu. But hey: I like to keep an eye on what other Linux distros are up to and, following on from news that Lenovo is putting Fedora on its laptops, the release of Fedora 32 Workstation feels like a natural extension to that.

    So, what’s new in Fedora 32 exactly?

    Well, this version of the rpm-based Linux distro ships nearly every nut-and-bolt of the recent GNOME 3.36 release, including the blurry new lock screen, UI theme improvements, and do-not-disturb toggle, and features the redesigned GNOME Clocks app as a default app.

  • Upgrade Fedora 31 to Fedora 32 using the CLI

    I want to upgrade the Fedora version 31 to Fedora 32 Linux server using the command line option. How do I upgrade Fedora 31 to 32?

    Fedora Linux is another popular open-source Linux distribution targeted at desktop/laptop and server users who want cutting edge software in binary format. The latest version of Fedora is 32. Fedora version 32 released on April 28, 2020. This page shows you how to upgrade the existing version of Fedora Linux 31 to 32 using the dnf command.

How to Upgrade Fedora 31 to Fedora 32

  • How to Upgrade Fedora 31 to Fedora 32

    Fedora 32 was released today with a ton of new features. In this Linux quick tip we will show you how to upgrade from Fedora 31 to Fedora 32 in the GUI and on the Command Line.

    From your desktop go to the Application Overview and select Software. The quickest way to accomplish this is the hit the super key (sometimes call the Windows key or Systems Key) then type software.

In Slashdot now

By "Bogdan Popa, Microsoft News Editor"

  • Fedora 32 Officially Launched

    Fedora 32 now available for download, and so are all the typical flavors that are specifically aimed at certain uses.

    For example, in addition to the main Fedora 32 image, today’s release also includes Fedora Workstation, Fedora Server, and Fedora CoreOS.

    As it typically happens with major Fedora updates, version 32 comes with substantial improvements, and one notable addition is GNOME 3.36.

    This GNOME update, which went live in March, is codenamed Gresik and sports a long list of changes, including a new lock screen design, additional refinements to settings, parental controls, and new software features.

    Fedora 32 also drops Python 2 and goes for Python 3.8, as the old version has already reached the end of life. The team at Fedora, however, has decided to include a legacy python27 package just for developers and users who still need this old version.

Things To Do After Installing Fedora 32

  • Things To Do After Installing Fedora 32

    Fedora releases a new version in approximately every 6 months. Each now version is supported with updates for 13 months in total. The distribution is a good place to get the latest stable software and technologies consistently.

    The latest stable version is currently Fedora 32, you can download it from the Fedora official website.

    If you are a new Fedora user, you may be wondering about what to do after installation. The guide will help you through this part. No matter the supported Fedora version you use, you can apply everything on this list.

Botched upgrade

  • Postmortem 2020-04-28

    Root Causes: Backup restore mechanisms didn’t work as expected. Server has booted after upgrade, but has been partly inconsistent. The package manager dnf has stopped working, due to the python2 to python3 move of Fedora 32. Also SSH login were not possible anymore. Login on Rescue console, was not possible due to selinux enforcing new PAM rules.

    Trigger: Failed Upgrade from Fedora 31 to Fedora 32.

    Resolution: I’ve setup Fedora 31 again and restored the files I needed from the backup, instead of doing a full system backup or trying to repair the broken Fedora 32 installation.

Adam Williamson: Fedora 32 release and Lenovo announcement

  • Adam Williamson: Fedora 32 release and Lenovo announcement

    It's been a big week in Fedora news: first came the announcement of Lenovo planning to ship laptops preloaded with Fedora, and today Fedora 32 is released. I'm happy this release was again "on time" (at least if you go by our definition and not Phoronix's!), though it was kinda chaotic in the last week or so. We just changed the installer, the partitioning library, the custom partitioning tool, the kernel and the main desktop's display manager - that's all perfectly normal stuff to change a day before you sign off the release, right? I'm pretty confident this is fine!

    But seriously folks, I think it turned out to be a pretty good sausage, like most of the ones we've put on the shelves lately. Please do take it for a spin and see how it works for you.

The IBM/Red Hat press release

  • Fedora 32 Now Generally Available
  • Fedora 32 Now Generally Available
  • Fedora 32 now generally available

    The Fedora Project, a Red Hat, Inc., sponsored and community-driven open source collaboration, today announced the general availability of Fedora 32, the latest version of the fully open source Fedora operating system.

    Fedora 32 includes new features aimed at addressing issues facing modern developers and IT teams. Highlights include key updates to Fedora’s desktop-focused edition, Fedora 32 Workstation, and a new computational neuroscience lab image, aimed at bringing those working in science fields to open source software.

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