Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

An Interview with Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

We wanted to interview Linus Torvalds because all the computers at our school run Linux. Mr. Torvalds lives in our neighborhood so we sent him an email and asked for an interview.

So what happens when Linus Torvalds sits down with a high school freshman for an interview? You get to hear what every 15 year-old wants to know about our favorite open source software developer.

Linus Torvalds Q & A, by Anthony Q.

Q: What is something you want the public to know about Linux or yourself?

Linus: “Not a lot, I usually keep a low profile. I try to concentrate on the technical side. The nicest thing is that because Linux is open source, I don’t do any of the marketing stuff and I’ve never had a company around Linux. Other people have made companies around Linux. That means that I don’t have any incentive to go and spread the word.”

Q: Did you ever imagine that you would become a famous computer programmer?

Linus: “No. When I grew up I actually wanted to be a scientist, I mean everyone dreams of being something. Being a famous scientist, when I was a teenager, was my goal in life. I guess it's close enough. It was more of a daydream.”

Q: What was your first computer?

Linus: “My first computer was a (were not that common in the US) commodore VIC 20 which ran at one megahertz, not gigahertz, megahertz, and had 3 ½ kilobytes of memory. In many ways it was a very simple (computer) one. It’s much easier to get into computers when they are simple, so you can understand exactly what they are doing.”

Q: Who was your idol when you were growing up, and is it the same now?

Full Interview.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Singularity: Escalation, ASTROKILL and More

Red Hat News

Android Leftovers

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more