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Storage: ScyllaDB, PostgreSQL and Economics Of Decentralized Storage

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  • ScyllaDB Announces 4.0 Release of Its Open Source NoSQL Database

    ScyllaDB today announced Scylla Open Source 4.0, the latest major release of its high-performance NoSQL database for real-time big data workloads. This release marks a significant milestone, as the company has moved beyond feature parity with Apache Cassandra, now also serving as an open source drop-in, no-lock-in alternative to Amazon DynamoDB.

    Scylla Open Source 4.0 builds on Scylla’s close-to-the-hardware design, which enables optimal use of modern server infrastructure. Written from the ground-up in C++, Scylla delivers performance of millions of OPS on a single node, scales out to hundreds of nodes and consistently achieves a 99% tail latency of less than one millisecond.

  • Why businesses are choosing PostgreSQL to drive digital transformation

    While many factors go into choosing the ideal database management system, flexibility and interoperability should be non-negotiable.

    In agile projects, especially at the beginning of the project, not everything is known – not even the cloud infrastructure. Being locked into a platform or vendor inhibits developers from considering specific database capabilities, such as stored procedures, data types and advanced operators.

    To overcome this issue, many developers now limit themselves to standard ANSI SQL and Object Request Brokers, and recreate many database capabilities in the application logic, such as transactional consistency, data management and queries.

    This approach, however, may lead to large portions of custom code, significantly lowering performance and introducing transactional inconsistencies.

    What organizations and developers need are flexible and interoperable systems, or, open source databases – but not just any type of open source databases.

  • Economics Of Decentralized Storage

    So, if you never access the data, Tardigrade is twice as expensive as the centralized competition. If you access 50% of the data each month, it costs $32.50/TB against Wasabi's $5.99, so more than 5 times as expensive. What exactly is the value Tardigrade adds to justify the extra cost to store data? Simply "decentralization"?

    But, like all these cryptocurrency-based systems, Tardigrade's "decentralization" is more a marketing term than a practical reality. The money isn't decentralized, because customers pay Storj, who then pays a little of that money to the storage node operators (SNOs): [...]

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