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Storage: ScyllaDB, PostgreSQL and Economics Of Decentralized Storage

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  • ScyllaDB Announces 4.0 Release of Its Open Source NoSQL Database

    ScyllaDB today announced Scylla Open Source 4.0, the latest major release of its high-performance NoSQL database for real-time big data workloads. This release marks a significant milestone, as the company has moved beyond feature parity with Apache Cassandra, now also serving as an open source drop-in, no-lock-in alternative to Amazon DynamoDB.

    Scylla Open Source 4.0 builds on Scylla’s close-to-the-hardware design, which enables optimal use of modern server infrastructure. Written from the ground-up in C++, Scylla delivers performance of millions of OPS on a single node, scales out to hundreds of nodes and consistently achieves a 99% tail latency of less than one millisecond.

  • Why businesses are choosing PostgreSQL to drive digital transformation

    While many factors go into choosing the ideal database management system, flexibility and interoperability should be non-negotiable.

    In agile projects, especially at the beginning of the project, not everything is known – not even the cloud infrastructure. Being locked into a platform or vendor inhibits developers from considering specific database capabilities, such as stored procedures, data types and advanced operators.

    To overcome this issue, many developers now limit themselves to standard ANSI SQL and Object Request Brokers, and recreate many database capabilities in the application logic, such as transactional consistency, data management and queries.

    This approach, however, may lead to large portions of custom code, significantly lowering performance and introducing transactional inconsistencies.

    What organizations and developers need are flexible and interoperable systems, or, open source databases – but not just any type of open source databases.

  • Economics Of Decentralized Storage

    So, if you never access the data, Tardigrade is twice as expensive as the centralized competition. If you access 50% of the data each month, it costs $32.50/TB against Wasabi's $5.99, so more than 5 times as expensive. What exactly is the value Tardigrade adds to justify the extra cost to store data? Simply "decentralization"?

    But, like all these cryptocurrency-based systems, Tardigrade's "decentralization" is more a marketing term than a practical reality. The money isn't decentralized, because customers pay Storj, who then pays a little of that money to the storage node operators (SNOs): [...]

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Arduino and Raspberry Pi, Synthesizer and More

  • Rebuilding a Passap E6000 knitting machine with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Irene Wolf is the owner a Passap E6000, a computerized knitting machine which features pair of needle beds, and decided it was time to give it an upgrade. In particular, she wanted the ability to control its rear needle bed automatically in a similar manner to the way the front is normally operated for extra functionality.

  • Robotic cornhole board guarantees three points every time

    You may have seen Mark Rober’s automated dartboard or Stuff Made Here’s backboard, which use advanced engineering to create apparatuses that ensure you “can’t miss.” Now that summer is in full swing, what about a robotic cornhole board? Michael Rechtin decided to take on this challenge using a webcam pointed at the sky for sensing and DC motors that move the board along an X/Y plane on a set of sliding drawer rails. When a bean bag is thrown, the camera feeds the video over to a laptop running a Processing sketch to analyze its trajectory and passes adjustment info to an Arduino. This then controls the motors for repositioning, which attempts to predict where the bag will land and guide it into the hold for three points!

  • Synthesizer Gets An External Touch Screen

    So he started to look for a software solution to get him the rest of the way. Luckily the MODX runs Linux, and Yamaha has made good on their GPL responsibilities and released the source code for anyone who’s interested. While poking around, he figured out that the device uses tslib to talk to the touch screen, which [sn00zerman] had worked with on previous projects. He realized that the solution might be as simple as finding a USB touch screen controller that’s compatible with the version of tslib running on the MODX.

  • Coffee Lake system supports seven independent displays

    Vecow’s rugged “RCX-1000 PEG” series runs Linux or Win 10 on 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs with up to 2x PCI/PCIe x16 slots for graphics plus PCIe x4, 2x M.2, 2x mini-PCIe, 4x SATA, 6x USB 3.1 Gen2, and 2x GbE ports. Vecow announced another rugged, PCIe-enabled system with Intel 8th/9th Gen Coffee Lake processors to join its GPC-1000 and water-cooled RCX-1500W systems. While those models have up to 4x PCIe x16 slots for graphics cards, the RCX-1400 PEG has only 2x PCIe x16 slots, but also offers other PCIe and/or PCI interfaces, depending on the model.

  • Coffee Lake-H module features Intel CM246 chipset

    Nexcom’s Linux-ready “ICES 675” is a COM Express Basic Type 6 module with an 8th Gen Coffee Lake-H CPU and Intel CM246 chipset, triple display support, multiple PCIe connections, and an optional ICEB 8060 carrier.

Linux, Twitter look remove ‘blacklist/whitelist’ from code

Coding terms like ‘master’, ‘slave’, ‘blacklist’, and ‘whitelist’ could soon be a thing of the past as the likes of Linux, Twitter, Git, and IBM’s Red Hat begin purging non-inclusive phrases from their code. Twitter Engineering announced last week that it wanted to “move away from” certain phrases that the social media company said was not reflective of its values. “There is no switch we can flip to make these changes everywhere, at once,” the company said. “We will continue to iterate on this work and want to put in place processes and systems that will allow us to apply these changes at scale.” Along with terms like ‘blacklist’ and ‘whitelist’, Twitter said it wants to move away from gendered pronouns and even ‘dummy value’. Read more

GNOME 3.36.4 released

Hello, GNOME 3.36.4 is now available. This is a stable bugfix release for 3.36. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.36 are advised to upgrade.The GNOME 3.36 flatpak runtimes have been updated as well. If you want to compile GNOME 3.36.3, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot: https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.36.4/gnome-3.36.4.tar.xz The list of updated modules and changes is available here https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/NEWS The source packages are available here https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/sources/ Regards, Abderrahim Kitouni GNOME Release Team Read more Also: GNOME 3.36.4 Released With Faster Mutter Fix Back-Ported

Python Programming

  • Python import: Advanced Techniques and Tips

    In Python, you use the import keyword to make code in one module available in another. Imports in Python are important for structuring your code effectively. Using imports properly will make you more productive, allowing you to reuse code while keeping your projects maintainable. This tutorial will provide a thorough overview of Python’s import statement and how it works. The import system is powerful, and you’ll learn how to harness this power. While you’ll cover many of the concepts behind Python’s import system, this tutorial is mostly example driven. You’ll learn from several code examples throughout.

  • Python 101 – Learning about Dictionaries (Video)
  • Writing docs is not just writing docs

    I joined the Spyder team almost two years ago, and I never thought I was going to end up working on docs. Six months ago I started a project with CAM Gerlach and Carlos Cordoba to improve Spyder’s documentation. At first, I didn’t actually understand how important docs are for software, especially for open source projects. However, during all this time I’ve learned how documentation has a huge impact on the open-source community and I’ve been thankful to have been able to do this. But, from the beginning, I asked myself “why am I the ‘right person’ for this?” Improving Spyder’s documentation started as part of a NumFOCUS Small Development Grant awarded at the end of last year. The goal of the project was not only to update the documentation for Spyder 4, but also to make it more user-friendly, so users can understand Spyder’s key concepts and get started with it more easily.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 000 - Begin Again

    This probably is the fourth (or is it fifth) time, I’ll be attempting to learn how to program. And probably the same number of attempts at #100DaysOfCode.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 001 - Beginning With Classes

    Notes I’ve taken from the videos I watched, today. This is my attempt at Feynman-ing (below), what I learnt so far. Classes and Object Oriented Programming started to come together for me, when I saw Kushal using them. To use my father’s carpentry analogy, I could in theory just hammer nails into wood to join them. But to make a really strong joint, I could use other methods. I could screw pieces of wood together, which is markedly better than just nailing them. I could chisel wood and create a dovetail or mortise joint.

  • Object Oriented Programming in Python: Complete Tutorial

    Python is a powerful programming language used for web application development. It is also a widely popular programming language used for machine learning and artificial intelligence applications. With Python, complex programming problem-solving becomes simpler. There are several approaches to problem-solving in Python. OOP is one of those approaches. In this article, I will introduce you to some fundamental OOP principles in Python development.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 3 Blog Post