Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Patent case against GNOME resolved

Filed under
GNOME
Legal

Today, on the 20th of May 2020, the GNOME Foundation, Rothschild Patent Imaging, and Leigh M. Rothschild are pleased to announce that the patent dispute between Rothschild Patent Imaging and GNOME has been settled.

In this walk-away settlement, GNOME receives a release and covenant not to be sued for any patent held by Rothschild Patent Imaging. Further, both Rothschild Patent Imaging and Leigh Rothschild are granting a release and covenant to any software that is released under an existing Open Source Initiative approved license (and subsequent versions thereof), including for the entire Rothschild portfolio of patents, to the extent such software forms a material part of the infringement allegation.

Neil McGovern, Executive Director for the GNOME Foundation said “I’m exceptionally pleased that we have concluded this case. This will allow us to refocus our attention on creating a free software desktop, and will ensure certainty for all free and open source software in future.”

Read more

GNOME and Rothschild Patent Imaging settle

  • GNOME and Rothschild Patent Imaging settle

    Back in October 2019, the GNOME project announced they had been hit by what they called a patent troll with Rothschild Patent Imaging. Now it seems it has been resolved and it's a bin win for open source.

    The problem was with the Shotwell image management application, as Rothschild claimed it infringed on their patents. Yesterday, GNOME announced a "walk-away settlement" that not only drops the case against GNOME but both Rothschild Patent Imaging and Leigh Rothschild in the case will now grant a "release and covenant" to any software released under an OSI (Open Source Initiative) approved license which covers the entire Rothschild portfolio of patents. That's a nice win for FOSS developers.

Linux desktop org GNOME Foundation settles lawsuit with patent

  • Linux desktop org GNOME Foundation settles lawsuit with patent troll

    The GNOME Foundation has settled a US lawsuit brought against it by Rothschild Patent Imaging, complete with an undertaking by the patent assertion entity that it will not sue GNOME for IP infringment again.

    In a so-called "walk away" settlement, Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPI) and the open-source body are discontinuing a case that began in October last year. RPI sued for alleged IP infringement of one of its patents in GNOME photo-organising tool Shotwell, marking the first time a free software project had been targeted in that way.

LWN with comments

  • GNOME resolves Rothschild patent suit

    The patent suit filed against the GNOME Foundation last September has now been resolved. "In this walk-away settlement, GNOME receives a release and covenant not to be sued for any patent held by Rothschild Patent Imaging. Further, both Rothschild Patent Imaging and Leigh Rothschild are granting a release and covenant to any software that is released under an existing Open Source Initiative approved license (and subsequent versions thereof), including for the entire Rothschild portfolio of patents, to the extent such software forms a material part of the infringement allegation." There is no mention of what the foundation had to give — if anything — for this settlement,

GNOME gets big open-source patent win

  • GNOME gets big open-source patent win

    In 2019, the GNOME Foundation was sued by Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPI) for violating its "wireless image distribution system and method patent" (US Patent No. 9,936,086)." Rothschild, a Non-Practicing Entity (aka a patent troll), had filed 714 lawsuits over the past six years.

    Now, in a surprise move, GNOME, makers of the popular Linux desktop of the same name, won not only a release and covenant not to be sued for any Rothschild patent but a release and covenant to any software that is released under an existing Open Source Initiative (OSI) approved license.

Gnome wins the battle against the patent troll

  • Anwesha Das: Gnome wins the battle against the patent troll

    The Gnome Foundation settled the dispute with Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPIL), RPIL agrees not to sue Gnome further for any intellectual property infringement. RPIL also signed to an undertaking to that effect.

    In the last week of September 2019, Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPIL) filed a lawsuit against the Gnome Foundation. The case was filed under Title 35 of the United States Code for the infringement of the patent and violation of the intellectual property rights of the RPIL. They claimed that Gnome's Shotwell Photo manager, infringed the patent titled “Wireless Image Distribution System and Method,” being number 086.

CCIA: GNOME Slays Troll

  • GNOME Slays Troll

    Last year, Patent Progress reported on a troll targeting the GNOME Foundation, a major open source coordinating entity. Despite Director Iancu’s public statement claiming that trolls are a myth, this troll was very real. In fact, it was one of the Rothschild NPEs, one of a plethora of companies Leigh Rothschild has used in nearly 900 separate NPE patent lawsuits to date.

    Fortunately, however, GNOME was able to retain quality pro bono counsel. And after 10 months, they achieved not just a walk-away settlement where GNOME owes nothing, but actually went further. Neither the Rothschild subsidiary in this litigation, Rothschild Patent Imaging, nor any other Rothschild entity—or any entity purchasing a Rothschild-owned patent—can bring a lawsuit where the lawsuit alleges infringement by any software that is released under an open source license recognized by the Open Source Initiative.

Law360: Patent Troll Will Stop Suing Over Open Source Software

  • 'Patent Troll' Will Stop Suing Over Open Source Software

    Free-software nonprofit the GNOME Foundation and alleged "patent troll" Rothschild Patent Imaging LLC have reached a deal to end infringement litigation in California federal court, with RPI making a broad promise not to sue over open source software.

    RPI released GNOME from infringement allegations and signed a covenant not to sue the organization over any patent in its portfolio, the nonprofit said Wednesday. Additionally, RPI granted a release and covenant to anyone releasing software under a license approved by the Open Source Initiative, at least if that software "forms a material part of the infringement allegation," GNOME said.

Troll Settles Patent Clash With GNOME

  • Troll Settles Patent Clash With GNOME

    The open source GNOME Foundation has won the right to freely use a patent it was being sued over by notorious patent troll, Rothschild Patent Imaging (RPIL) — one of 30+ subsidiaries created by Leigh Rothschild.

    The tiny foundation, which supports an open source, Linux-based desktop environment, was hit in September 2019 with a court case by RPIL — which the EFF describes as a “poster child for patent litigation abuse” .

    RPIL had claimed that GNOME’s “Shotwell” system was in breach of US Patent No. 9,936,086, which essentially claims the patent rights a smartphone that can receive images that a user can filter.

    (The EFF blames the US’s Patent Office for issuing “more stupid software patents to fuel patent trolling” — many companies, if not all, settle with Rothschild for circa $50,000; cheaper than fighting in courts).

Gnome settles Patent litigation

  • Gnome settles Patent litigation: Amanda Brock, CEO OpenUK interviews Neil McGovern, ED of Gnome Foundation and Board Director at OpenUK

    “Firstly, Congratulations Neil and very well done. This is probably the best possible result Gnome could have had right?

    “I believe so, yes. We have managed to secure a more certain future for all of open source software and sent a very strong message to other patent holders that attempts to bring suit against us will be at best, futile.”

    The Open Source Community response to Rothschild, I am resisting calling them a troll, was probably a bit of a shock to Rothschild. Can you tell us a bit about it and the amount raised from so many people and organisations?

    “This has happened before, when Groupon tried to register GNOME as a trademark, despite us already holding it. This time. we managed to raise over $150,000 from over 4,000 individual donors. One of the strengths of the community is how passionately we care about what we do, and how we rally around each other when there’s trouble.”

    You must be really proud to have achieved this result?

    “Absolutely! Although the patent hasn’t been invalidated, we have secured a bigger prize – the protection of open source software from a large non-practicing entity.”

    Sherman and Sterling are a huge global law firm and acted as Gnome’s
    pro bono legal counsel? How did that come about?
    “It came a little out of the blue! I was flying back from GUADEC (our annual conference) when this all kicked off, and when I landed, I had an email from Matt Berkowitz offering pro-bono representation. They had been monitoring patent filings and saw this one, so reached out to us.

Shearman Trio Stands Up for Open Source Software

  • Litigators of the Week: Shearman Trio Stands Up for Open Source Software

    Our Litigators of the Week are a team from Shearman & Sterling led by litigation partners Matt Berkowitz and Kieran Kieckhefer and associate Joy Wang. Working pro bono for the non-profit GNOME Foundation, they won a victory for literally everyone in the world in a patent fight over free and open-source software.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • [Attackers] Target California University Leading Covid-19 Research

    UCSF confirmed it was the target of an “illegal intrusion” but declined to explain which portion of its IT network may have been compromised. Researchers at the university are among those leading American antibody testing and clinical trials for possible coronavirus treatments, including a recent study on anti-malarial drugs touted by President Donald Trump as a possible remedy, then refuted by scientists.

  • NSA flags email vulnerability
  • Improve your security with two-factor authentication [Ed: But Google is not security but a MITM with close ties to NSA]

    Two-factor authentication (or simply 2FA) is a way of authentication where a user must provide additional verification after username and password login. The form of verification can be a string of characters delivered via text message or generated with TOTP client. Two-factor authentication improves security because compromised username and password are not enough to get the account breached. This article will explain how to use TOTP clients for two-factor authentication and why TOTP is better than many other two-factor methods. As an example, I will show how to enable and set up TOTP client Google Authenticator in Google’s services. [...] Next, I will show you how to enable two-factor authentication in Google services. After that, we will install Google Authenticator and enable 2FA with Google account. In this guide, I will log in to a Google account with a desktop browser, which is very similar to how the process works for other services. Login to your Google Account and proceed in the menu to Security> Signing into Google > 2-step verification. If two-step verification is enabled on your Google account, you should already see an option for Google Authenticator on this page, and you can continue to the next part of this article (Installing Google Authenticator). Otherwise, continue this part. Google has now opened a window where is introduced two-step verification. You can read it through and then click forward.

  • Linux security: Protect your systems with fail2ban

    Security, for system administrators, is an ongoing struggle because you must secure your systems enough to protect them from unwanted attacks but not so much that user productivity is hindered. It's a difficult balance to maintain. There are always complaints of "too much" security, but when a system is compromised, the complaints range from, "There wasn't enough security" to "Why didn't you use better security controls?" The struggle is real. There are controls you can put into place that are both effective against intruder attack and yet stealthy enough to allow users to operate in a generally unfettered manner. Fail2ban is the answer to protect services from brute force and other automated attacks.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr), Fedora (firefox and prboom-plus), Oracle (bind), Red Hat (firefox), and SUSE (osc).

GNU Linux-Libre 5.7

  • GNU Linux-Libre 5.7 Released - Drops Intel iGPU Security Fix Over Arrays Of Numbers

    The GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu kernel was released following last weekend's Linux 5.7 kernel release. But the info-gnu mailing list was slow and thus just hitting the wire today for the latest version of this sanitized version of the Linux kernel. One interesting change in GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu is dropping the Intel Gen7 "iGPU Leak" security mitigation over not liking the sources.

  • GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu
    GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu cleaning-up scripts, cleaned-up sources, and
    cleaning-up logs (including tarball signatures) are now available from
    our git-based release archive git://linux-libre.fsfla.org/releases.git/
    tags {scripts,sources,logs}/v5.7-gnu.
    
    Tarballs and incremental patches were still slowly getting compressed as
    I started writing this.  It took me so long to write this up that by now
    they are probably ready to be published, along with scripts and logs, at
    <https://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/5.7-gnu/>.
    
    We will not create or publish binary xdeltas any more: tarballs and
    patches are now created with git archive and git diff, respectively.
    So, even if you want a tarball, you don't have to wait for the
    compression to complete on our end.  Update the git repo, and run:
    
      git checkout logs/v5.7-gnu &&
      git archive --format tar --prefix=linux-5.7/ \
        sources/v5.7-gnu > linux-libre-5.7-gnu.tar &&
      gpg --verify linux-libre-5.7-gnu.tar.sign
    
    This will get you the same tarball and signature that, once compressed,
    will be published at the usual place.  Note that the --prefix= was
    maintained like that of the corresponding upstream release, so that
    anyone already used to downloading our tarballs and dealing with the
    unusual prefix doesn't have to make any changes.
    
    
    No changes were required to the cleaning up scripts since -rc7-gnu,
    already published under the new release procedure, though a little too
    late for it to be useful.
    
    The git repository is already populated with scripts, sources and logs
    for past releases since Linux-libre became a GNU project; earlier
    releases might be added at a later time.  The imported sources, scripts,
    logs and signatures are the result of long-time hard work by Jason Self,
    in the git repo https://jxself.org/git/linux-libre.git.  Nearly all of
    the branches, tags and commits in the new repo are taken directly from
    there, though I've verified all of the sources/ and scripts/ tags and
    corrected a few mismatches that AFAICT followed from errors in the SVN
    repository.  The main exception is the storage of logs and tarball
    signatures; he'd used git notes, but those didn't quite work for me, so
    I turned them into a separate tree of tags with logs and tarball
    signatures.  Alas, I failed to bring the .log signatures into it.  Will
    fix, and move the tags.
    
    
    The 5.7 upstream release removed the i1480 uwb driver, that we used to
    clean up, but added a crypto driver for the Marvell OcteonTX CPT, for
    Mediatek MT7622 WMAC, for Qualcomm IPA, for the Azoteq
    IQS620A/621/622/624/625 Multi-function device, for IDT 82P33xxx PTP
    clock, and a Modem Host Interface (MHI) bus driver, all of which
    required cleaning up.  Actually, the MHI bus one is tentative: I
    couldn't quite figure out what it is that it loads, so I've
    conservatively blocked it in the likely case it is a piece of non-Free
    Software.
    
    Some further adjustments were required on account of the introduction of
    the function firmware_request_platform to the firmware-loading
    interface, of the usual assortment of false positives all over, and blob
    adjustments in AMD GPU, Arm64 DTS files, Meson VDec, Realtek Bluetooth,
    m88ds3103 dvb frontend, Mediatek mt8173 VPU, Qualcomm Venus, Broadcom
    FMAC, Mediatek 7622 and 7663 wifi, silead x86 touchscreen; of the
    movement of the cleaned-up mscc phy driver (and new blob names in it)
    and wd719x documentation within the source tree; and of something very
    unexpected: the introduction of binary blobs as arrays of numbers in
    source code for gen7 i915 gpus.
    
    
    I unfortunately could not find correspoding sources for the new binary
    blobs introduced in such an old-fashioned way, and they're big enough
    and not regular enough that I could just assume them to be data rather
    than code, so I've removed them.  If you come across source code for
    those bits, or can explain to me how transparent and trivial they are
    once they're disassembled with existing Free tools, I'll be very glad to
    restore them.
    
    
    Other relevant changes were made to the deblob-check script:
    
    - its self-test now uses a safer $echo instead of echo to feed itself
    the test patterns, and to complain in case they fail; some of the
    patterns got mangled (unintended backslash transformations) by /bin/sh's
    echo in Trisquel 8.  That's a well-known shell portability issue that we
    had a fix for, but that somehow hadn't come up before in the context of
    the testsuite.
    
    - I moved the block of default suspicious patterns after the Linux- or
    patch-specific ones.  This enables these default patterns to be
    overridden by longer matches (e.g., cleaning up a trailing comma along
    with the new Intel presumed blobs).  In Non-Deterministic Automata-based
    regular expression engines, such as those in GNU awk and GNU sed, this
    doesn't make a difference, because the longest match is always
    preferred, but in engines that process alternatives left-to-right and
    take the first match, like Python's and Perl's, there was no way to
    override the blob sequence as needed.  Now there is.
    
    
    For up-to-the-minute news, join us on #linux-libre of irc.gnu.org
    (Freenode), or follow me (@lxoliva) on Twister <http://twister.net.co/>,
    Secure Scuttlebutt, GNU social at social.libreplanet.org, Diaspora* at
    pod.libreplanetbr.org or pump.io at identi.ca.  Check the link in the
    signature for direct links.
    
    
    Be Free! with GNU Linux-libre.
    
    
    What is GNU Linux-libre?
    ------------------------
    
      GNU Linux-libre is a Free version of the kernel Linux (see below),
      suitable for use with the GNU Operating System in 100% Free
      GNU/Linux-libre System Distributions.
      http://www.gnu.org/distros/
    
      It removes non-Free components from Linux, that are disguised as
      source code or distributed in separate files.  It also disables
      run-time requests for non-Free components, shipped separately or as
      part of Linux, and documentation pointing to them, so as to avoid
      (Free-)baiting users into the trap of non-Free Software.
      http://www.fsfla.org/anuncio/2010-11-Linux-2.6.36-libre-debait
    
      Linux-libre started within the gNewSense GNU/Linux distribution.
      It was later adopted by Jeff Moe, who coined its name, and in 2008
      it became a project maintained by FSF Latin America.  In 2012, it
      became part of the GNU Project.
    
      The GNU Linux-libre project takes a minimal-changes approach to
      cleaning up Linux, making no effort to substitute components that
      need to be removed with functionally equivalent Free ones.
      Nevertheless, we encourage and support efforts towards doing so.
      http://libreplanet.org/wiki/LinuxLibre:Devices_that_require_non-free_firmware
    
      Our mascot is Freedo, a light-blue penguin that has just come out
      of the shower.  Although we like penguins, GNU is a much greater
      contribution to the entire system, so its mascot deserves more
      promotion.  See our web page for their images.
      http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/
    
    What is Linux?
    --------------
    
      Linux is a clone of the Unix kernel [...]
    
    (snipped from Documentation/admin-guide/README.rst)
    

Android Leftovers

NexDock Touch Laptop Shell Features a Touchscreen Display, an Optional Magnetic Mount for Your Phone

NexDock is a Motorola Lapdock alternative launched in 2016 with a 14.1″ non-touch display, a built-in battery, and a Bluetooth keyboard. It was followed by NexDock 2 last year with a Full HD display and a USB-C port. The company has now announced they had started manufacturing NexDock Touch based on NexDock 2 but adding a touchscreen display and some other features, and the company has also developed a magnetic mount – compatible with all NexDock models – to conveniently attach your phone to the side of the display. Read more Also: Rikomagic DS02 Android Digital Signage Player Supports 4G LTE or WiFi Connectivity