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Linux at Home: DIY security solutions for the home

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Linux

In this series, we look at a range of home activities where Linux can make the most of our time at home, keeping active and engaged. The change of lifestyle enforced by Covid-19 is an opportunity to expand our horizons, and spend more time on activities we have neglected in the past.

Police have said crime has fallen by 28% since the UK was locked down to battle the coronavirus with a a 37% drop in burglary. People are now encouraged to return to their workplace if it’s impossible for them to work from home. In light of this, the fall in burglary is unlikely to be maintained. So what can we do?

A Linux-based surveillance system can dramatically increase the security of your property and keep your family protected. The surveillance can be set up at various blind spots around your home that you can’t see from your windows so that if you hear an unusual noise or would like some extra peace of mind, you can check the perimeter of your property without having to leave your home. Home surveillance is not just a preventative system, it can also help bring criminals to justice.

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