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Favorite *buntu

Where's the...

"I use a real distro" option?

re: Where's the

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Sudo Poll

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re: re: Where's the

lololol

re: Where's the...

Teehee. Well, I figured folks who didn't use a(n) *buntu wouldn't participate in this one. And now they come out with an ultimate-gamers version. it took 3 days to bittorrent in, but I guess I'll take a look at it.

2-minute review of Ubuntu Ultimate Gamer

It looked really cool with a martial-arts/dragon/ying yangy black and blue theme. It's bit dark for my old eyes to take for very long, but it was definitely cool looking. As usual, I had to quickly ctrl+alt+F2 to console to edit xorg.conf file before system lock-up with all *buntus, what with my vastly differing dual monitors confusing its hardware detection. So, I knew upon this edit that for an ultimate gaming version, there would be very little games played. ...as default. It apparently does not come with proprietary drivers for ATI and NVIDIA cards, which will be needed to play any 3D games. If they are available, then why did xorg default to "nv?"

I didn't get a chance to look around too much as the first desktop icon I clicked on caused a hard-lock up requiring the use of my hardware reset button. I could do more work: install to hard drive and install the NVIDIA drivers, but in my opinion, if one is gonna put out a 3 gig livecd download and call it the ultimate gamers edition - then by-golly it should come with drivers to use it.

#kde users == #gnome users on *buntu

Seems like (more or less) the same amount of people use KDE as they use Gnome on *buntu.
And this happens eventough Gnome gets most of the attention from Canonical.
Maybe it's time for another paid developer on Kubuntu?

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