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KDE: Elisa, Krita and KDE Itinerary

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KDE
  • UPnP DLNA support in Elisa

    It has been a long time since I have written about Elisa. In the meantime, I have been busy working on Elisa and also some other personal side projects. I plan to write about them later.

    One area, Elisa is not fulfilling my needs is the support for UPnP DLNA. I am working actively on that but this is a lot of work and my plan is to probably release a preview of it in the next release to get feedback on it.

  • First Krita Beta for Android and ChromeOS in Play Store

    Thanks to the hard work of Sharaf Zaman, Krita is now available in the Google Play Store for Android tablets and Chromebooks (not for Android phones).

    This beta, based on Krita 4.2.9, is the full desktop version of Krita, so it doesn’t have a special touch user interface. But it’s there, and you can play with it.

    Unlike the Windows and Steam store, we don’t ask for money for Krita in the store, since it’s the only way people can install Krita on those devices, but you can buy a supporter badge from within Krita to support development.

  • Efficient Coordinate to Timezone Mapping

    For KDE Itinerary it’s crucial we know the correct timezone for each element in the timeline, precisely enough to also handle complex situations like daylight saving time changes during an international flight. How can we reliably determine the timezone though, e.g. given a geographic coordinate, offline and on a resource-constraint mobile device?

    [...]

    The use of an image format has the advantage that precision/cost trade-offs are pretty obvious, it’s very easy to create using the above mentioned timezone shapefiles and QGIS, and debugging can be done visually with an image viewer.

    This approach has been in use for the offline preparation of KDE Itinerary’s extractor engine knowledge base so far. Not so much for it’s runtime efficiency though (as we are using a gigantic 27942 x 13968 map), but for its ease of use.

    The efficiency of this comes from the run-length encoding of scanlines, which is very good at leveraging one-dimensional spatial proximity of the encoded features, ie. a typical scanline only contains few continuous regions, independent of the resolution. It however doesn’t use the same property in the second dimension at all. Image formats that exploit this like e.g. PNG achieve an even better compression, but at the cost of constant memory decoding.

Last week in Kube

  • Last week in Kube

    You can now view “flagged”/”starred” messages per account. This is a short-cut to getting that functionality eventually folded into the todo view (I think…), and allows you to quickly show a list of messages that you have marked as important so you can deal with them. The view works best if there is a small number of marked messages, and you unflag them once you have dealt with them.

Open source digital painting app Krita comes to Android

Open source graphics editor, Krita, now available

  • Open source graphics editor, Krita, now available in the Play Store

    The open source graphics editor, Krita, is now available to download via the Play Store, its developers have announced. The Play Store version of the software is still the full desktop version of Krita so it doesn’t include a touch interface; it may, therefore, not be so great on a small Android phone, but should be quite decent on a larger tablet of Chrome OS device.

    The Play Store version is based on the latest Krita 4.2.9 which launched in March. The project said that unlike the Windows and Steam store editions, it isn’t asking for money for the Play Store edition as it’s the only way people can install Krita on Android devices. If you do want to support the project, however, you can buy a supporter badge from within Krita.

    If you want to try out this beta, you’ll need to navigate to the Play Store listing with a compatible device then just press install. Ideally, you’ll want to try it out on a device with a large screen as the app is still optimised for desktop systems. Also, keep in mind that the product is still in Early Access so you could run into some problems that haven’t been fixed yet.

Krita... now available for Android tablets and Chromebooks

  • Krita, a FOSS digital drawing app, is now available for Android tablets and Chromebooks

    When it comes to digital drawing apps on Android, the Google Play Store offers a variety of different options to choose from. Sadly though, most of the professional-grade apps are either very expensive or offer only a few basic features for free. In order to give Android tablet and Chromebook users a feature-packed free and open-source alternative, the team behind Krita has now released its first beta on the platform.

    [...]

    Unlike the Steam and Windows Store version, Krita for Android and ChromeOS is completely free to use, but you can buy a supporter badge from within the app to support development for the project. Do note that since this is an early access release, you might encounter some bugs while using the app on your device.

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today's leftovers

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