Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Alpine Linux 3.12 Released With D Language Support, MIPS64 Port

Filed under
Linux

Version 3.12 of the Alpine Linux lightweight distribution built around musl libc and Busybox is now available for this platform popular with containers and other embedded use-cases.

While MIPS owner Wave Computing filed for bankruptcy earlier this month and other major setbacks in recent years for the MIPS architecture (including the abandoning of their Open MIPS plans), Alpine 3.12 is the first release now supporting 64-bit MIPS. MIPS64 big endian is supported by Alpine Linux 3.12 for the many MIPS64 systems still out there.

Read more

Direct: Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released

Alpine Linux 3.12 Released with Initial MIPS64 Port

  • Alpine Linux 3.12 Released with Initial MIPS64 Port, Support for YubiKeys

    While not a major milestone, Alpine Linux 3.12 is here to introduce initial support for the MIPS64 (Big Endian) architecture. This means that you can now install the distribution on this platform.

    On top of that, this new stable release also introduces initial support for the D programming language, also known as Dlang.

Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released With “Big Endian”

  • Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released With “Big Endian” and “Dlang” Support

    Alpine Linux has announced the release of major version 3.12.0, which is the first of the “3.12” stable series. Alpine is a Linux distribution that focuses on security, and it’s designed for routers, firewalls, VPNs, VoIP boxes, and servers. Moreover, it is particularly lightweight, small in size (130 Mb), simple to use, independent, and non-commercial. All in all, Alpine is a security-oriented OS designed for power users who want to use a solid basis upon which to build a robust system for whatever purpose they may have.

    The 3.12.0 release brings support for “mips64” (big-endian), and also the D programming language (Dlang). D is used in projects like Facebook, eBay, and Netflix, and generally, it is deployed in virtual machines, OS kernels, GPU programming, machine learning, web development, numerical analysis, and more. As for the big-endian architecture, this is the system of storing the most-significant byte of a word of digital data at the lower memory address of the storage location.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: GStreamer, Drat, RasPi, Python

KF6 Progress Report: Almost Bastille Day (July) Edition

So the world has been hectic lately, dunno if you’ve seen the news, but that means that I didn’t publish an update since my previous KF6 progress report back in February! Now that the lock down has been (temporarily?) lifted where I live and that things are a bit less crazy, it’s time for an update. An actual Qt 6 is not published yet and we didn’t branch for KF6 yet either. Still as can be seen on the KF6 Workboard there are plenty of tasks in our backlog which can be acted upon now. No need to wait to participate, all the work done now will make the transition to KF6 easier later on anyway. What has been done since the last post? On the workboard, we currently have 22 tasks in progress and 4 tasks done. Clearly that’s not a huge activity in more than four months but the state of the world might explain it in part. Obviously with so little tasks done, they mostly revolve around our usual suspects. If you fancy becoming one of the unsung heroes of KDE, come and help working tasks from the KF6 Workboard! More hands are needed and right now is a good time to discover it and get into it than when Qt6 will be released. Indeed, when Qt6 will be around it will be much less quiet around here. :-) Read more

today's howtos

Android Leftovers