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Software: NetworkManager, Google's Chrome/Chromium, Best Linux Remote Desktop Tools, RapidDisk and Mastodon

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Software
  • NetworkManager 1.26 Development Progressing With New Functionality

    NetworkManager 1.25.2-dev is the latest development version of this important Linux networking component in the road towards NetworkManager 1.26.

    NetworkManager 1.25.2-dev was bumped this weekend as another milestone towards the upcoming 1.26 stable release of this widely used component for configuring wired and wireless networking on Linux and other platforms. Some of the changes building up so far for NetworkManager 1.26 include:

    - A new "firewalld-zone" option that is enabled by default that will install a firewalld zone for connection sharing and put the IPv4/IPv6 shared mode interfaces in this zone.

  • Chrome Is Reaching The Point Of Good X11 + Wayland Support In Same Build

    Google's Chrome/Chromium web browser is finally reaching the stage where having both the X11 support and Ozone abstraction layer for Wayland can be enabled concurrently in the same build.

    Thanks to the work by Google, Igalia, and others, the Chrome/Chromium code-base is nearly at the stage where the traditional X11 support can be built along with the Ozone platform support concurrently. Ozone is the platform abstraction layer being worked on for years for handling low-level input/graphics and necessary for Wayland support as well as various embedded use-cases and other platform abstraction capabilities. An overview of the Ozone code can be found here.

  • Best Linux Remote Desktop Tools For Ubuntu 20.04 LTS To Share Your Desktop In 2020

    7. KDE Connect
    KDE Connect helps you to enable remote desktop sharing with the help of Android and Linux applications.

    8. VNC Connect
    VNC Connect is a simple and secure remote desktop sharing tool for Linux. VNC Connect is equipped with 256 bit AES session encryption and it uses Remote Frame Buffer protocol to remotely control another computer.

  • RapidDisk version 6.1 released

    RapidDisk is an advanced Linux RAM Disk which consists of a collection of modules and an administration tool. Features include: Dynamically allocate RAM as block device. Use them as stand alone disk drives or even map them as caching nodes to slower local disk drives.

  • Experience With Mastodon
  • Share PeerTube Videos on Mastodon

NetworkManager 1.26 Brings Autoconnect for Wi-Fi Profiles

  • NetworkManager 1.26 Brings Autoconnect for Wi-Fi Profiles, firewalld zone Support

    Numerous GNU/Linux distributions ship with NetworkManager by default to allow users to manage network connections, whether they’re Wi-Fi or wired connections or VPN connections.

    In NetworkManager 1.26, there’s now automatic connection for Wi-Fi profiles when all previous activation attempts fail. Previously, if a Wi-Fi profile failed to autoconnect to the network, the automatism was blocked.

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More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • Multiple File/Image Upload with Django 3, Angular 10 and FormData

    In the previous tutorial we have seen how to implement file uploading in Django and Angular 10. In this tutorial, we'll see how to implement multiple file uploading with FormData. It's recommended that you start from the previous tutorial to see detailed steps of how to create a django project, how to install Angular CLI and generate a new Angular 10 project along with services and components as we won't cover those basics in this part.

  • Python Projects for Beginners (Massive 2020 Update)

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation. How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do! When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress. Project-based learning is also the philosophy behind our teaching method at Dataquest, where we teach data science skills using Python. Why? Because time and time again, we’ve seen that it works!

  • Practical Recipes for Working With Files in Python

    Python has several built-in modules and functions for handling files. These functions are spread out over several modules such as os, os.path, shutil, and pathlib, to name a few. This course gathers in one place many of the functions you need to know in order to perform the most common operations on files in Python.

  • Introduction to scheduled tasks helper scripts

    For all PythonAnywhere users who like to automate their workflow using scripts there’s already the pythonanywhere package which provides an interface for some PythonAnywhere API features. If you’re one of them, you might be interested in some recent additions for programmatic management of Scheduled Tasks.

  • Mike Driscoll: Python Malware May be Coming to a Computer Near You

    Cyborg Security reported recently that malware is starting to appear that has been written using the Python programming language. Traditionally, most malware has been written in compiled languages, such as C or C++. The reason is simple. Compiled languages let the attacker create smaller, harder to detect, executables. However, Python’s popularity and ease of use has made it more appealing to malware authors. The biggest problem with Python for malware is that it tends to use considerably more RAM and CPU than malware written in C or C++. Of course, with PCs being as powerful as they are now, this is no longer an issue. Especially when you consider that there are so many applications being written with Electron. Your web browser is now a huge resource hog! As the Cyborg Security website points out, you can use PyInstaller or py2exe to create an executable of your Python code. What that article doesn’t mention is that someone will need to digitally sign that software as well to get it to run on Windows 10. One thing the article mentions that was interesting to me is that you can use Nuitka to basically transpile your Python code to C and you’ll end up with a much smaller executable than you would with either PyInstaller or py2exe.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #432 (Aug. 4, 2020)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #10
  • Python 3.6.9 : My colab tutorials - parts 008.

today's howtos

Graphics: AMD, Intel and Wayland/Wayfire

  • Defaulting Radeon GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs To Better Linux Driver Is Held Up By Analog Outputs

    Switching from the "Radeon" to "AMDGPU" kernel driver on Linux is possible for Radeon GCN 1.0/1.1 era graphics cards and doing so can mean slight performance benefits, the ability to run the AMDVLK or RADV Vulkan drivers, and simply making use of this better maintained driver. But having these original GCN graphics cards default to the modern AMDGPU driver appears held up by the lack of analog video output support with that driver.

  • Intel's Open-Source H.265/HEVC Encoder Sees First Release Of 2020

    Intel's Scalable Video Technology team is known for their open-source video encoder work particularly on AV1 and VP9 formats, but they also continue to maintain a high performance H.265/HEVC encoder as well. Intel SVT-HEVC 1.5 was released on Monday as their first major update of the year. Intel SVT-HEVC 1.5 fixes "all memory leaks" following a refactoring of their allocation/deallocation code that also leads to the ability for FFmpeg to run multi-instance encoding in parallel. SVT-HEVC 1.5 also has a number of optimizations, fixes for a random hang issue with few threads (something we've seen as well with SVT-HEVC in our own benchmarks), and a number of other fixes.

  • GNOME's Mutter Adds Support For Launching "Trusted Clients" On Wayland

    Merged to GNOME's Mutter compositor is an API for Wayland to allow the launching of trusted clients. This "trusted clients" support is namely about allowing child windows to be signified as being from a parent window/process. This can also allow for some nifty use-cases for GNOME on Wayland. The patch explains: Unfortunately, although the child process can be a graphical program, currently it is not possible for the inner code to identify the windows created by the child in a secure manner (this is: being able to ensure that a malicious program won't be able to trick the inner code into thinking it is a child process launched by it).

  • Wayfire 0.5 Wayland Compositor Brings Latency Optimizations, More Protocols

    Wayfire, a Wayland compositor inspired by the likes of Compiz with different desktop effects, is out today with a new feature release. Perhaps most exciting with Wayfire 0.5 is the work done to improve (reduce) the latency. Wayfire now better tracks how much time it needs to draw a frame, support for the presentation time protocol, and other work. Aside from latency improvements, there are Wayland protocol additions for primary selection for allowing middle-click-paste to work plus the output-power-management protocol for better handling display output power management behavior.

How Librem 5 Solves NSA’s Warning About Cellphone Location Data

The NSA has published new warnings for military and intelligence personnel about the threats from location data that is captured constantly on modern cellphones (originally reported by the Wall Street Journal). While privacy advocates (including us at Purism) have long warned about these risks, having the NSA publish an official document on the subject helps demonstrate that cellphone tracking is a real privacy and security problem for everyone. We have been thinking about the danger of location data on cellphones for a long time at Purism and have designed the Librem 5 from scratch specifically to address this risk. The NSA document describes and confirms a number of the threats I wrote about almost a year and a half ago when I introduced our “lockdown mode” feature on the Librem 5–a feature that disables all sensors on the Librem 5. In this post I’ll describe the threats the NSA presents in their document and how we address them with the Librem 5. Read more Also: Librem 5 Web Apps